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Festool TS55 Rip cut blade

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I'm wanting to purchase a rip cut blade for my TS55 to rip ~25mm Oak. What blade would people recommend please?

I see Festool themselves do rip cut blades with 12, 18 and 28 teeth.

Assuming I'm not looking for a super clean cut, as it will be planed after, should I go with the 12 teeth?
 

Steve Maskery

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It depends on how thick your stock is. If you are cutting to its capacity, 12T may be suitable, but if your stock is, say 20mm, you may be better with one of the others.
With rip saws, the aim is to use as few teeth as possible, but have at least 3 in the wood at any one time.
S
 
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Steve Maskery":2ixv26gx said:
It depends on how thick your stock is. If you are cutting to its capacity, 12T may be suitable, but if your stock is, say 20mm, you may be better with one of the others.
With rip saws, the aim is to use as few teeth as possible, but have at least 3 in the wood at any one time.
S

Well - I'd say anything from 15 to 25mm. So perhaps I should go for the 18 teeth?
 

Steve Maskery

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I can't say Yes and I can't say No, but it sounds about right to me. Try it and report back, it can hardly be a disaster.

A word of warning. I once fitted a rip blade (albeit it was not a Festool blade). It did the cut fine, but it really messed up the rubber on my track because the kerf was wider. When I switched back, it was no longer Zero Clearance.
You might not have that problem with a genuine Festool blade, I don't know.
 

Sideways

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Steve Maskery":gz62n8t5 said:
I can't say Yes and I can't say No, but it sounds about right to me. Try it and report back, it can hardly be a disaster.

A word of warning. I once fitted a rip blade (albeit it was not a Festool blade). It did the cut fine, but it really messed up the rubber on my track because the kerf was wider. When I switched back, it was no longer Zero Clearance.
You might not have that problem with a genuine Festool blade, I don't know.
I've heard of purists who keep different tracks for different blades as this is a known issue.

I kept my old metabo circ saw as it's more powerful and deeper cutting than the Festool (which is brilliant with sheet material and crosscutting). It gives an extra option if I need to rip something chunky that would be a pain to lift up onto the tablesaw.
I don't know why but I think of ripping as a slightly less precise activity and I'm quite happy to use the old Metabo with a length of shelf board or such as a straight edge to rough stuff down to a more manageable size..
 

Nelsun

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I have the 12T "Panther" blade for ripping. It's the same plate thickness and kerf as the stock 48T blade (1.6 and 2.2mm) so no worries about splinter guards.

The rip blade leaves an OK edge and has sailed through cuts where the 48T would grumble. Not surprisingly!

Didn't know about the 3 teeth in the cut bit. Makes my brain ache trying to figure out what depths would be best for which number of teeth at this time of night.
 

RobinBHM

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For ripping I would go for the fewest teeth possible.

I tend to buy freud blades for the festool -ebay. Im not sure if festool blades are better.
 

HappyHacker

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I ripped some 25mm quarter sawn oak planks using the 28 tooth blade with no problems. The finish was very good and a very light sanding gave a very good edge.
 

Mrs C

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Nelsun":177niuv5 said:
I have the 12T "Panther" blade for ripping. It's the same plate thickness and kerf as the stock 48T blade (1.6 and 2.2mm) so no worries about splinter guards.

The rip blade leaves an OK edge and has sailed through cuts where the 48T would grumble. Not surprisingly!

Didn't know about the 3 teeth in the cut bit. Makes my brain ache trying to figure out what depths would be best for which number of teeth at this time of night.
Any ideas why I would keep getting kick back when using a panther? Would speed have anything to do with it. I tried using a panther a couple of years ago, frightened myself and went back to my 48T.
 
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Mrs C":3daapigm said:
Nelsun":3daapigm said:
I have the 12T "Panther" blade for ripping. It's the same plate thickness and kerf as the stock 48T blade (1.6 and 2.2mm) so no worries about splinter guards.

The rip blade leaves an OK edge and has sailed through cuts where the 48T would grumble. Not surprisingly!

Didn't know about the 3 teeth in the cut bit. Makes my brain ache trying to figure out what depths would be best for which number of teeth at this time of night.
Any ideas why I would keep getting kick back when using a panther? Would speed have anything to do with it. I tried using a panther a couple of years ago, frightened myself and went back to my 48T.
Did you let the blade get up to speed first? I've seen a few people plunge as soon as they press the trigger. My TS55 takes a few seconds to get up to speed.
 

Nelsun

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Not sure what would cause a blade with fewer teeth to kickback repeatedly. I've used mine heaps on 20-40mm soft and hard woods with no problems ever / yet. Usually speed is set at 3 or 4 and I've never plunged it into anything; always entering the material fully plunged and up to speed.

What were you cutting at the time and were you plunging into the wood?
 

Nelsun

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Mrs C":19fudvmr said:
I think perhaps I need to be brave and try again!
I've never thought there was any issue with rip blades beyond the standard sharp spinning finger removing ones. If it was giving you repeated kickback every time then I'd query the blade itself and check it for anything that ain't right (teeth, arbour and that it's not a taco).

If anyone would be so kind as to explain the reasoning behind the 3 teeth in the cut thing I'd appreciate it. I can hazard a guess but that's never usually a good idea ;)
 

Steve Maskery

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The idea of three teeth is that it give a good balance between having gullets that are large enough to carry away the sawdust (fewest teeth) and small bites at the job (most teeth).
For example, if you tried to cut 6mm board with a rip blade, the workpiece will be smaller than the gap between the teeth, and each tooth will go Bang as it hits the surface.
Conversely, trying to cut 3" material with a fine blade means that the gullets will get clogged and the blade will stall.
With 3 teeth, there are always already two teeth in the wood as the next tooth enters, and two behind it as it leaves. The gullets can handle the sawdust and we have a smooth cutting process.
 

AjB

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I use an 18T blade to cut 30mm oak and it works very well.
 

chippy1970

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Google "Keyblades" they are excellent blades. I use them in my Festool and my Mafell saws. Much cheaper and better than the manufacturers own blades.
 

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Steve Maskery":n241v4rz said:
A word of warning. I once fitted a rip blade (albeit it was not a Festool blade). It did the cut fine, but it really messed up the rubber on my track because the kerf was wider. When I switched back, it was no longer Zero Clearance.
You might not have that problem with a genuine Festool blade, I don't know.
Ditto here.

I've only tried a rip blade once. Mine is a Makita, and I know one difference with the TS55 is the riving knife (the Makita doesn't have one), but I got serious kickback when the stock moved and pinched the blade at the back. And as with Steve's experience, I wrecked the splinter strip, too.

So I don't use it for ripping natural timber any more.

E.
 

sammy.se

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Eric The Viking":akayaf35 said:
Steve Maskery":akayaf35 said:
A word of warning. I once fitted a rip blade (albeit it was not a Festool blade). It did the cut fine, but it really messed up the rubber on my track because the kerf was wider. When I switched back, it was no longer Zero Clearance.
You might not have that problem with a genuine Festool blade, I don't know.
Ditto here.

I've only tried a rip blade once. Mine is a Makita, and I know one difference with the TS55 is the riving knife (the Makita doesn't have one), but I got serious kickback when the stock moved and pinched the blade at the back. And as with Steve's experience, I wrecked the splinter strip, too.

So I don't use it for ripping natural timber any more.

E.
Maybe one solution you this is either a wedge or plunge cutting a little way up the stock, leaving a couple of inches intact?

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