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Eumenia RAS motor seized any advice

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sawitall

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The motor in my Eumenia RAS ( Model ML50L)appears to have seized - sorry to say it's my fault as it was struggling with a long heavy rip and jammed two or three times despite me trying to be sympathetic to it and releasing as soon as possible.

I am based on South side of Glasgow anyone know where I can get the motor looked at /repaired. A s always this has struck just as I was trying to finish a big job and it will be a real struggle without it.

Dave
 

9fingers

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Is it a brush motor (very noisy) or an induction motor (quite quiet)?
Single phase or 3 phase?
Can you turn it at all by hand? Does it feel uniformly tight or alternately tight then free(er) etc

Bob
 

Mike.C

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Dave, Eumenia were produced by a washing machine company of the same name, so this, if need be, will give you another option.

Cheers

Mike
 

9fingers

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I've not come across a seized motor where the solution has been a rewind.
If it is an induction motor, then the most likely problem is a seized bearing which is a cheap fix
If an induction motor then it could be a brushgear problem or to do with the gearing on the shaft or indeed a bearing hence my questions.

The OP is a newbie here and joined only minutes before asking for help. He probably has not set the account up properly and so does not know he has replies waiting. :roll:

Bob
 

Lord Kitchener

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9fingers":1egc0o9h said:
I've not come across a seized motor where the solution has been a rewind.
If it is an induction motor, then the most likely problem is a seized bearing which is a cheap fix

Indeed, but I would expect any decent motor rewinders to be able to take care of that too.
 

9fingers

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Quite agree LK but a bearing change should be within the capabilities of anyone on here who by definition is of a practical bent.

Bob
 

sawitall

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Thanks to everyone who replied for their input. I am very poor on electrical matters but believe it is induction - don't know enough to say whether Single or Triple phase.

Things have surprisingly improved . I took the blade and the blade mount of allowed the unit to cool for an hour or so then in my ignorant amateur way gave it a spray of WD40 on the basis that it may be the bearings and they may not be sealed well enough so the lubricant may just get in . Half an hour later turned the switch and on it came apparently running as before. since used it with great care and it seems to be performing perfectly again - phew !

While it was out of order I phoned a local company who specialised in electric motor repair and asked for a quote if it needed a rewind - was told it would be at least 8 hours work at more than £30 per hour -minimum.

This episode has got me thinking about whether a motor such as this needs or should be serviced every so often. If the answer is yes is it a job I am likely to be able to do myself eg are the bearings usually easy to access and where am I likely to get spares if they are damaged ( noting what was said about manufactures no longer around)

I think I have been lucky this time so apart from being even more sympathetic to my tools than before I would like to know what I should be doing with the Eumenia to prolong it's active life - maybe a rub down once a day with an asprin would help ?

Thanks again to everyone I do appreciate the replies all of which are valued.
 

tomatwark

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Glad your saw is working again.

One thing that will prolong its life is not to rip timber on it.

It is a crosscut saw after all and is not really designed for ripping and ripping on a RAS is one of the most dangerous operations you can use it for.

Tom
 

9fingers

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Having looked a photo online, I suspect you have an induction motor. This type of motor run quietly and do not have a opening through which you can see the brushes such as a normal mains powered electric drill for instance.

Next thing is that when you want to lubricate something, don't use a water displacer (ever wondered what WD stands for in WD40??)
The solvent dries out very quickly and is next to useless. some light 3 in 1 oil is probably the best thing to have on the shelf for lubrication.

99% of the time ball races (bearings) are standard parts and not specific to a machine manufacturer. These can be bought from bearing factors in most towns, online from many places such as arc-euro, bearing boys, simply bearings etc even ebay
They are specified by width, bore and outside diameter and are readily available in metric and imperial sizes.

Not too sure why your bearing seized and yet released so easily. Either dirt has got in, or they got very hot and released once they had cooled.
In your position, if I relied upon this tool for income, I would change the bearings as soon as time allows. This needs to be done in a clean environment where you can set aside the parts in the order of dismantling for re assembly, making sketches or taking photos of what goes where.
Remove the old bearings first then buy replacements to match. Sealed ones with a suffix 2R or RR will have rubber dust seals and last longer for little extra cost.

hth

Bob
 

Lord Kitchener

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Was it actually seized, did you try turning it by hand?

Reason I ask is that motors of this sort often have a thermal cutout built in which stop the motor when it overheats.
 
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