• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Elliott Progress 16 Restoration

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Aengus

New member
Joined
21 Mar 2018
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Oxford
Hello,

I recently purchased my first pillar drill for woodworking, a well used Elliott Progress 16, pictured below:

Overall.jpg


I'd like to tackle a bit of restoration on it before using it in anger as there seem to be a couple of issues. Firstly, although the quill action seems very smooth with no play, the top sheet metal housing rattles a lot when it's running. This seems to be because the method of slackening the belt is to pull a lever just in front of the motor backwards which allows the top of the motor to pivot forwards and the front of the housing to drop down enabling one access to the belt to change speeds. However this action seems a little sloppy and the lever doesn't seem to be locking things down securely as such the belt doesn't look properly tensioned when it it's running. I've tried to capture a photo of the linkage here:

Top linkage.jpg


Any ideas for how to get the top more securely fixed in place? It seems to only be attached at the back via the two metal rods going across it. I can take more photos if that'll help!

My second question is regarding the fastenings that secure the two rods going through the top housing, I've not encountered these before, so was wondering what they're called? How they can be removed? (So I can take the top off and start cleaning inside.) And whether they're re-usable once they've been removed as they seem just bent in place?

Top fixings.jpg


Finally there seems to be some sort of sticky perished gasket/seal surrounding where the quill exits the main casting, can this be replaced? Should I just scrape off the old one?

Perished oil seal.jpg


Cheers!
 

Attachments

Deadeye

Established Member
Joined
21 Aug 2017
Messages
677
Reaction score
162
Location
Buckinghamshire
I think I can answer the last question.
Most drills seem to have some sort of buffer ring to stop the ring bashing into the main housing on retraction. On my Meddings its a felt-like ring; on the Startrite it's like a big rubber O-ring.
A large O-ring would be a suitable replacement I should think.
 

Aengus

New member
Joined
21 Mar 2018
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Oxford
Okay great, good to know! I'll see what I can find to replace it.
 

Vann

Established Member
Joined
15 Oct 2008
Messages
1,931
Reaction score
73
Location
Petone, New Zealand
Aengus":249ufpeu said:
...My second question is regarding the fastenings that secure the two rods going through the top housing, I've not encountered these before, so was wondering what they're called? How they can be removed? (So I can take the top off and start cleaning inside.) And whether they're re-usable once they've been removed as they seem just bent in place?

...
While I'm not familiar with this exact fitting, it appears to be a form of spring washer.

I would try two screwdrivers or similar, one each side, to prise the tabs out of the groove (I think you'll need three hands). I suspect the washers will be easily damaged, so go easy - maybe even file up two short wedges from steel sheet (say 1.6 - 3mm sheet) instead of using screwdrivers.

However, if you do destroy the fittings, I think they could be replaced by a standard circlip holding a spring washer and one or two flat washers.

Good luck.

Cheers, Vann.
 

AES

Established Member
Joined
18 Feb 2011
Messages
4,940
Reaction score
390
Location
Switzerland, near Basel
I'm also not familiar with your drill, but the method of tensioning the drive belt sounds a very similar principle to my Rexon - i.e. NOT those 2 rods and funny bracket, but the idea of having the motor itself pivot, and some method of pushing the motor "outwards" to tension the belt.

So to me it SOUNDS like the motor has reached the end of the available travel, and that suggests that the belt is old and has stretched beyond the point where it's useful. With luck it should have some markings on it and those will enable you to buy a new, non-stretched belt from a local motor factor. I wouldn't bet money but from the sound of things I'd strongly expect the new belt to be much shorter than the old one you removed.

Those clip thingys on the rods do look a bit weird to me, never seen anything like them before that I remember. If you can't get them off without them breaking is there enough length on the rods to make a thread for a nut?
 

Phil Pascoe

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
29 Jan 2012
Messages
21,483
Reaction score
1,758
Location
Shaft City, Mid Cornish Desert
It looks like the spring part is outboard of a washer - a circlip would do, I'd have thought.

Looking again, I think I've seen something like them before. They look to be two seperate parts - I wonder if you could grab them something and pull them outwards and away fro the shafts - there might be a sprung lug that slips in past the washer into the casing at the same time the outer part seats in the groove.
 

nev

Established Member
Joined
21 Jan 2011
Messages
4,858
Reaction score
14
Location
The green and wetter end of the M4.
Looks like fancy circlips to me, as in bent spring steel small hole and slot on the front for fixing to the post and a larger hole at the back to clear the post, therefore giving a sprung push to hold the tin work in place. Should be able to tap/ push off in the direction of arrow and possibly lift off post. If it is like this then judicial use of screwdriver to open them up a little to increase the depth and therefore the holding strength.

Top%20fixings.jpg
 

Attachments

Aengus

New member
Joined
21 Mar 2018
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Oxford
Thanks for the advice guys!

I'll have a gentle go at the clips this weekend and see if I can tease them off.

For the belt, I popped it off and took this photo of the information:
Belt.jpg


I can't post links but I just searched for an A44 V Belt on "Bearing Boys" and there were two results, either Dunlop or Dunlop Premium. So would something like this be appropriate? Is it best to keep using a smooth belt as opposed to using a cogged one?

Whilst we're on the topic of the motor, the pulley above it seems to have a couple of tiny nibbles taken out of some of the layers and some of the edges seem a tiny bit twisted/bent. Is this likely to be increasing the vibration a lot if it's not perfectly balanced? Is it possible to source spare pulleys or are these very specific to the drill?
 

Attachments

SteveW1000

Established Member
Joined
4 Oct 2011
Messages
97
Reaction score
0
Location
Leytonstone, London
I would just tidy up any sharp edges /burrs on the pulleys with a fine file. I've a couple of Startrite Mercury pillar drills and they have sheet steel covers over the belts and rattles seem to be normal for those type of drill. Perhaps some rubber tubing over any areas that might knock together,
 

Will M

New member
Joined
2 Feb 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
Shenfield, Essex
Hi Aengus, I just picked up an Elliott machine just like yours, and in similar condition. How did you get on with the refresh? Have you made much use of the drill?
 

mindthatwhatouch

Established Member
Joined
16 Jan 2013
Messages
447
Reaction score
29
Location
sussex
Re belt.
Bear in mind someone may have not replaced with the correct one in the past. Use a clogged belt as they are quieter, more efficient and tend to last longer. Measure around the pulleys with a piece of string then measure the string. Plenty of guides online to select correct size and shape.

Gluing a bit of lead to the inside of the lid may help dampen the rattling.
 

Will M

New member
Joined
2 Feb 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
Shenfield, Essex
Ah that’s very helpful, thanks for the advice. The noise part is a particular factor for me, so I’ll be sure to replace the belt as you suggest. I just got rid of an old Walker Turner floorstander, very beaten up, accurate enough, but very rattley!
 

Latest posts

Top