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Elektra Beckum KGS331

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Redhill Red

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Hi all,
Iam in the market for a new sliding mitre saw and seriously thinking of buying one of these , they look good quality and probably as important very quite, the only downside is the cost , before I buy as anyone got an opinion, good or bad on this saw or suggest an alternative?
 

sawdustalley

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Hello, and welcome to UKWorkshop

I have the KGS 255 saw at the moment, brilliant bit of kit - maybe a bit better for site use than in the workshop. There is a review here:

http://sawdustalley.co.uk/tools/reviews.php?id=19

I know from peoples words, that the saw you speak of is quality. Charley has one and I know he's very pleased with it - maybe he will post some comments if this catches his eye.

Try doing a search on these forums, see if anything comes up:
http://ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/search.php
 

Noel

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Hi Red,

I've had a KG 331 for a couple of years now. As you mention not the cheapest but well worth it for build quality and performance. When I did my research I had a few models to consider - Dewally 702/3, the Makita slider and the Scheppach Capas model. Went for the Scheppach. Great capacity but noisey and a bit on the big side. Kept it for 6 months and sold it. Back to square 1 - bought the DeWalt, played with it for a day and gave it back to the dealer. Wasn't a lot wrong with it, just didn't like it and too much plastic bits on it. Went to look at the Makita LS 1013, great saw, accurate, trenching ability but at £550 or so, couldn't justify it. Happened to be at a demo day at a dealer and saw the EB KGS 331. Had a go on it, bought it and took it home. Think it was about £350 or so with stand and dust kit. Plus points - INDUCTION motor nice and quiet, hardly any plastic components, very accurate, easy to use, good and heavy, reasonable dust collection., great width capacity, smooth and rigid slide action. Not so plus points (but not a deal breaker) - left bevel only (due to being direct drive and induction motor is a bit bigger than a brush motor), depth of cut limited to 50mm at 90, no trenching facility.
All in all mighty happy with it and would buy again. Original blade was ok too but now replaced with a Freud LP40M that leave cuts like glass. Providing you appreciate it's slight limitations you cannot go wrong.

Feel free to ask any further Qs.

Rgds

Noel
 

Aragorn

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Hi
Since everything's been favourable so far, thought I'd drop in the other side!
I have the Makita which is great. Very very accurate and good specs. Trenching is useful, as is the left/right bevel cuts.
I used to own an EB mitre saw and I don't like them because the fence "exploded" on me one day. I still have no idea what happened. It was a normal 90° cut in pine. If it wasn't for the safety specs I'd have lost an eye. I won't buy EB again.
Also, it wasn't at all accurate. 45° bevels were a laugh! I found it difficult to get a true 90° cut an when I did it needed checking every time. I've had the Makita for around a year now and since first setting it up for 90° and 45° mitres and bevels I haven't had to readjust it once! It's still perfectly accurate.
I know this machine costs more, but well worth the money I'd say.
Best of luck with whatever you go for!
 

Noel

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Aragorn,

How did the fence "explode" ?? First thought would've been that the blade came into contact with the fence, but nigh on impossible unless the table moved laterally. Was it a slider? Which model?

Rgds

Noel
 

Aragorn

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It was the KGS300 (I think) - compound mitre slider. The fence is aluminium I think. Like I said - I'm not sure what happened - all too quick. Presumably the blade caught on the pine somehow and smashed it into the fence. I always use clean sharp blades, and the pine was just normal everyday lumber. I'm baffled because this was an everyday cut, nothing fancy... Weird. Now I think of it the blade must have contacted the fence, because it was knarled up afterwards - had to chuck it away.
The fence shattered into two big pieces, a few smaller pieces and a hundred shards. One of the smaller bits smacked my glasses and another one cut me above the eye.
Even if it was a freak accident, I won't use an EB mitre saw again!
 

Charley

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I agree with Noely's comments, it's a great saw and well worth the money. The only downside for me is it hasn't got a trenching facility

Aragorn I don't like the sound of that :? , thank god you were wearing your safety specs.
 

sawdustalley

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Aragorn,

Having said that the fence on mine is warped, near the blade it is not in contact with the wood - this I have found caused kickback a couple of times, and means also its not always accurate.

I made a MDF sub-fence which means its all OK now. I nicked this idea from "johns workshop" I noticed he has like a sub-fence on his EB Chopsaw - not sure why though.
 

Aragorn

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sawdustalley":zb8is9rh said:
Having said that the fence on mine is warped, near the blade it is not in contact with the wood
This was the case on mine as well. Inaccurate and dangerous! Must be a common feature for this saw.
 

Noel

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Without wishing to appear to be on the "since I've got such and such tool, it must be perfect and everybody else must be using their tool in a dangerous manner" bandwagon I have heard nothing bad about EB mitre saws. Aragorn, if what happened to you had happened to me it would've went straight back to the dealer for a refund AND mucho discount off next purchase. Same goes for your warped fence James. Maybe I've been lucky. I've three EB products - the KGS331 and KS210 mitre saws - both brillant. I've also a EB 315 BS which is just about adequate, but no more.
Unless there was a major component failure I can't see how the blade could come in contact with the fence....But certainly not a pleasant experience and as Charley mentioned good job safety glasses were in use.

Rgds

Noel
 

Noel

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Red,

Now that you've had some views on the EB saw, let us know what you end up with.

Rgds

Noel
 

Alf

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sawdustalley":2go6zi3v said:
I noticed he has like a sub-fence on his EB Chopsaw - not sure why though.
Can't speak for "John" but I have one too*, for a couple/three reasons. Firstly it gives you zero clearance which keeps small bits whipping into the gap between the fences. Most of my use is at 90 degs, so until I'm forced to cut at an angle, I get a precise guide to exactly where the kerf of the saw is going to be. Although with a little effort even with the 45 deg cuts in it I can more or less get where it'll be anyway. Lastly, it extends the fence to either side to meet up with the fence extensions on my mitre saw workstation.

Wow, I hadn't realised just how useful it was until now... :D

Cheers, Alf

*No EB saw though. I have the non-compound chop saw that Axminster offered for about 5 seconds before they realised that there wasn't much of a market for non-compound saws. How do I manage to that every time? :? Perhaps it has rarity value...?
 

Aragorn

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Noely
I think people must have a range of experiences with all power tools. I have an EB bandsaw which I'm relatively pleased with - blade changes are a bit fiddly, but it cuts well and is a favoured tool.
Of course, my accident with the KGS300 happened about 1 week after the guarantee ran out and the dealer was very uninterested :evil: to put it mildly (not wanting to breach forum rules here!)
I actually had to persuade them to get me a new fence and they weren't keen. Took them about a fortnight. Charged me for it too.
I doubt you've been "lucky" with your tools: I'm sure EB make fine machines. This was a freak accident, but it's put me off KGSs.
 

Charley

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Yes a subfence is very useful as Alf's pointed out also it's a must when cutting smaller pieces such as moulding :)
 

Noel

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Aragorn,

Granted, every tools offers an individual experience. Hope you didn't give your tool shop any further business. They really should've looked at the bigger picture regarding future business from you.

Rgds

Noel
 

Aragorn

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Quite right! What goes around comes around - 2 years on and they've gone bust.
No wonder :idea:
 
A

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For me nothing can beat the big Makita.Had mine for 5 or 6 years and use it constantly on site and it just eats everything i put in front of it, and just as accurate as the day i became its Daddy

Cheers Steve
 
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