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Dust Extractor Purchase

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DavidN

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As a new addition to this website I require some help
I want to but a dust/chip extractor to suit my machines
Dewalt planer/thicknesser...Schepac band saw...Dewalt chop saw
Router table..Dewalt table saw...My workshop is a 2 car garage without the cars...Greatfull if anyone could suggest machine with marks out of 10

I work in oak down to MDF...
Will be visiting D&M tools show next week
Many Thanks
DavidN :?:
special prize for finding spelling mistakes
 

Alf

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Welcome to the forum, David.

Well apart from Scheppach, and everyone gets that one wrong, I can't spot one... :D As for dust extractors, I'll leave that to those lucky persons who managed to pick a good one. :roll:

Cheers, Alf
 

johnelliott

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I have the Electra Bekum SPA dust extractor. It came free with the EBPKF255 saw( from D&M) , I think it maybe costs maybe about £200. It's compact, powerful and the dust filter is heavy and of high quality. I am vey happy with it. The hose didn't last long, I've since replaced it with some heavy duty hose from Axminster
John
 

Bean

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I have one from Charnwood it very simular to many you see about, but seems to work well about £110 I think with a 2 year warrantee.

Bean
 

Adam

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I've got the Scheppach HA2600 and it's fine, but this is not an area I'm really aware of their being much to differentiate between any particular brands.

I reckon have a good look at all of the at D&M, and then try and get one on a good "discount"?

Adam
 

ProShop

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I originally went for the Axminster ADE 2200 priced at £293.50. But just spotted in the nick of time the Fox version, :D identical to the ADE 220 but at £145 + £9 carriage :) . How Axminster charge nearly twice the price is beyond me :roll: It has twin 100mm ports, useful if you have many machines. I'm very pleased with it. This machine is also badged under the Delta brand.
 
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Anonymous

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Mine's a B&Q special - 'Pro' is all the identifying mark there is. Works really well and cost under £150. Bought it quickly - it was there, the right price and I needed one in a hurry. Two minor problems - power lead is too short (darned EU?), as is the supplied hose (6'). Could always use lots more of the latter.
 

Martin

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I also have the HA2600 - I've no real experience with DE kit so cannot tell whether it's a particularly good buy or not. But the things I like about it are...

  • * Scheppach don't supply a power lead, leaving you to make one up using the supplied plug-in-thingy that goes into the extractor. You might see this is as a disadvantage, but at least you get to decide on cable length/quality etc.
    * Good quality construction - even the plastic bits seem extremely solid
    * Came with an earthing kit (for the extraction hose) and instructions on how to wire it all up correctly. Not sure whether you get this with other DEs, although I suppose it's common sense really...
    * Induction motor - much quieter than the shop-vac I'd been using previously.
    * The extra fine filter that you can buy as an option is also very solid. Too early to tell how well it performs because I've only just finished setting it all up.
The other thing I'd say is that a single extractor is unlikely to fit the bill for all your dust extraction needs. For example, the TS2500 I've just aquired comes with an extraction kit allowing the crown guard hose to plug into the main extraction hose. Having wired it all up over the weekend, I was running some tests and pulled the hose off of the crown guard - and was surprised at how little suction was being generated.

I'd heard about this before to be honest, but the chip style extractors like the HA2600 just aren't suited for small diameter extraction hoses. I'm therefore going to run 2 extractors on the TS - the HA2600 off of the main 4" extraction port on the saw, with my shop vac providing suction off the crown guard.

You may find alternatives that fit the bill better - I've heard good things about the Record 4000 for example, but the noise and the fact it was wall mounted put me off.

The other thing I'd recommend is getting some of those remote control power socket sets (assuming you don't want to go to the cost of a fully automated switching system). My Dad gave me a set as a gift - basically 5 plug in adaptors and a control unit with 5 on/off buttons on it. My extractors get plugged into 2 of them, and I can switch on/off at the press of a button on the remote. "It works great", as Norm would say....

Cheers,
Martin.
 

CYC

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I have the Electra Bekum SPA dust extractor. It came free with the EBPKF255 saw( from D&M) , I think it maybe costs maybe about £200. It's compact, powerful and the dust filter is heavy and of high quality. I am vey happy with it. The hose didn't last long, I've since replaced it with some heavy duty hose from Axminster
I also have an EB dust extractor which came with the table saw. I am very happy with it. I didn't have to change the hose.
Although i haven't got a planer/thicknesser yet so I haven't used the dust extractor with anything else than the table saw.

Good luck in your choice.
 

Adam

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Martin":3g8ef5r0 said:
I'd heard about this before to be honest, but the chip style extractors like the HA2600 just aren't suited for small diameter extraction hoses. I'm therefore going to run 2 extractors on the TS - the HA2600 off of the main 4" extraction port on the saw, with my shop vac providing suction off the crown guard.
Did you run a long section of 2" to the crown guard - or take 4" right upto the guard? The reason being that the air will always take the path of least resistance - i.e the 4" bit from the main body of the saw - in preference to a 1m+ of narrow pipe. However, a single small narrow section, in an otherwise large pipe, still allows a high volume of air to pass through. So coupling 4" pipe directly to the crownguard should give you a much better draw rate, all you need is one adaptor right at the end to join it to the crown guard port.

For example, if you get a cardboard tube from a kitchen roll for example, and stick a piece of card over the end with a hole about 5mm diameter and blow through it, you get a lot more air through than if you blow through a straw with a similar bore size - pipe resistance is determined by length at any given bore size.

Not sure if that makes any sense? Ahh solced it - heres a piccy of my setup...



The picture below shows only approx the last inch or two are at the narrow diameter, the main pipe is at full size as long as possible.

 

Martin

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asleitch":1wa6obkz said:
Did you run a long section of 2" to the crown guard - or take 4" right upto the guard?
Actually it is a 2" hose, which connects to the 4" extraction port at the bottom of the saw - it all came as part of the dust extraction kit with the TS. Kind of surprising given that Scheppach recommend the HA2600 as suitable for the TS2500 (and supply the crown guard DE kit with 2" hose as I've described). You'd have thought they'd have calculated how (in)effective the 2" hose is. But then I suppose it's all about sales pitch at the end of the day...

Thanks for the tip on the 4" hose - I hadn't thought of it that way (your kitchen roll/straw analogy makes perfect sense :D ) - doing this would no doubt help, but I assume would mean halving the effective extraction applied to the main DE port on the saw. I haven't yet used it enough to be able to decide which is more important - good extraction from the crown guard or from underneath, or less but applied to both. What do you think? Do you have your DE connected to both at once?

Cheers,
Martin.
 

Noel

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Martin,

I have a 2 1/2" hose over the table and a 4" under the table, controlled by a blastgate running from a Record DX5000. Works well for me with no apparent loss.

Noel
 

Adam

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Martin":1ta1vbk5 said:
but I assume would mean halving the effective extraction applied to the main DE port on the saw. I haven't yet used it enough to be able to decide which is more important - good extraction from the crown guard or from underneath, or less but applied to both. What do you think? Do you have your DE connected to both at once?
Cheers,
Martin.
Yes, I have both connected at once, I find the extra take off on the crown gaurd helps tremendously, and don't think I've noticed any problems with the less draw underneath - the dust generated is so fine (compared to P/T chips anyway), that it easily gets sucked away. When I finish a cut, their is no dust whatsoever on the piece being cut - initially at least, when I didn't have any crown guard extraction I got a lot of dust on top of the cut line (which annoyed me). It's still important to have some draw underneath to keep the motor cool perhaps? As once you push that metal "thingy" in place, their is no slot for airmovement in the dust collector port underneath anymore.

2" ports are just not designed to work with Low Pressure, High Volume extractors - (which is all standard "chip collectors" - for small diamater pipes, you need a high pressure, low volume solution (i.e. a vacuum). Using a large diameter pipe to the crownguard effectively gets around this problem, by making the crownguard a LPHV port (kind of).

Adam
 

Martin

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OK thanks Adam - I'll give it a try. Actually when I first set it all up (with the 2" hose attached) and ran some peices through, I did notice a fair amount of sawdust on the table itself after the cut (although dust was being extracted through the main 4" port).

Hopefully running 4" hose to the crown will sort it out. Also, I'm running with the fine filter attached (not possible to put the extractor outside) - I assume you're running with the standard filter, which probably makes some difference (not sure how much though - I've never tried the standard filter - no point really - small amounts of dust not collected at source are IMO less of a problem than the extractor spraying it back into the workshop from the filter).

Cheers,
Martin.
 

Adam

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Martin":13x8ryby said:
I've never tried the standard filter - no point really - small amounts of dust not collected at source are IMO less of a problem than the extractor spraying it back into the workshop from the filter).
Cheers, Martin.
I think you are correct in this, so much so that I built my extractor in a seperate outhouse - so no dust, either fine or otherwise makes it back into my shop. Being somewhat clumsy at changing the dust extractor bags - I tend to spill chips/dust everywhere, and so doubly benefit from having the extractor outside. I believe the "fine" filter, with its massively increased surface area due to the ridges, allows a higher throughout of air, rather than less - so should work "better".....

Adam
 

woodshavings

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I have done the same as Adam and placed my Extractor in a separate outside enclosure - I built an outside "cupboard" for it. One thing you might like to think about in choosing an extractor is the direction of the inlet pipe, horizontal or vertical. Dependant upon your workshop pipe arrangement, one type may be more convenient than the other. In my shop, the pipes run at ground level so a vertical inlet means an extra unnecessary bend.
 

Martin

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asleitch":npt8lsx9 said:
I believe the "fine" filter, with its massively increased surface area due to the ridges, allows a higher throughout of air, rather than less - so should work "better".....
Adam
You have this great habit of cheering me up Adam :D. Actually, the fine filter is also a little higher/taller than the standard filter, which no doubt helps...
 
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