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dig in eggs !

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Pipster

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having got myself set up properly now with a good lathe and tools and workshop (I only dabbled in the past) I have been practicing with the skew. (45 degree angle, middle of blade cutting, bevel rubbing etc ) and I have achieved good control and ribbon shavings and all that and i was feeling very proud of myself,. However, i tried having a go at a practice wooden egg today using some spare wood and As soon as I tried planing with the skew over the convex surface I kept getting horrendous dig ins and just couldn't gain control of the skew at all !
 

Frank S

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You cannot plane up hill with a skew ( against the grain ).So start at the fattest section of the egg and work downhill towards each end.
 

chipmunk

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Hi Pipster,
I admit that I find using a skew on eggs very tricky.

Partly I think it's the changing geometry of the rest height to the ideal cutting point on the egg that is tricky to master and adjust as you cut. In a flat planing cut the geometry is static once you feel you have the cut.

A few things can help I find....

Use a skew which is closer to straight across (more chisel-like) than the usual acute skews - this is the type of skew Gary Rance advocates. He also uses a round skew but that may be a step too far for some. The curved edge skews can help here because they have both acute and blunt angles in one.

Use the skew long-point down rather than heel down. That way you can see what you're doing more easily because the point doesn't get in the way as you get close to centre.

Instead of cutting in the middle of the cutting edge aim for a spot about a third of the way up.

The other thing is to hold the skew pretty tightly to the rest as you cut to prevent it making that initial catch as you turn the corner.

...and perhaps most important just take light cuts rather than taking too much bite at once.

Good luck and stick with it. There's nothing as satisfying as getting it right with a skew.

HTH
Jon
 

Richard Findley

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Hi

The main problem here is that the planning cut and the rolling cut are done differently. The way you are planning is fine, cutting below the centre of the edge - I recommend aiming for the bottom quarter area. For rolling beads - and an egg is just a wonky stretched bead - you need to be cutting with the poit of the tool. It doesn't matter which point although you get better visability with the long point, but if you use the point you will have total control, whereas using it in planning mode you are asking for a catch.

HTH

Richard
 

Sawyer

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Alternatively, a spindle gouge rolled on its side. Gives a pretty good finish and easy to control.
 
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