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madge

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This seems like a simple problem and it probably is for someone with more know how than myself, but it's been driving me mad for the last day or two figuring out the best way to do it. I want to put stringing in a stool leg with a square section of 30*30. The stringing needs to extend diagonally on one face of the leg from a point on one edge to a point on the other edge 200mm further up (leg outlined in black on pic). I was thinking of creating a simple triangular jig from mdf like the one shown in purple on the pic so that I could run a plough plane, router plane, scratch stock etc. up against it to create the channel but wanted some advice on the best tool to use, or if there is another easier way of doing it? The channel needs to be a max of 3.2mm (1/8 inch). I could use a router but would prefer to use a hand tool if possible. Ideas so far are record 43 plough, veritas miniature router plane (comes with a 3.2mm cutter but would need to make a fence for it) or scratch stock. Anyone have any suggestions?
 

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AndyT

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[Disclaimer - I've not done this - I'm just thinking about the question!]

You are thinking about using the fence on the plane or scratch, and are supplying a parallel edge for the fence to run on. But at the end of the cut, the fence will run out of edge, and hit the corner.

If you want to plane the groove, I think a better alternative would be this. Use your Record 043 or whatever, but remove its fence entirely. Clamp a straightedge (or screw it down or fix it with double sided tape or hot glue or whatever) so that it runs over your workpiece, at the corrrect angle, but to the right of where you want the groove. Then use the plane pushing up against this straightedge. The straightedge would be to the right of the plane.
This is like what you would do if cutting a groove on a very wide board, too far away from the edge to use the plane's fence, but with the extra subtlety of the angle. You'll want to knife the cut a bit first, especially at the far end.

But going across the grain like that you will need to sever the fibres first, all the way along, so on second thoughts I would do this:

Set a bevel gauge to the angle you want. Make a knife cut along it, defining one side of the groove. Move along and make a second cut.
Carefully chisel out along each line, to make a vee for the saw to rest in. Saw along with a fine tenon saw, almost down to the desired depth.

Remove the wood between the saw cuts, first with a small chisel, then with your Veritas mini router, but with no fence - the saw cuts will already have defined the line. Continue to your required depth.

And do take some pictures of however you decide to do it!
 

Mr T

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Hi

I would probably use a set up similar to yours, then use a router. If I didn't have a router I would use a cutting guage to define the width of the groove then use a scratch stock to take out the waste. Ensure the flat face of the guage cutter is facing outwards.

That's how I would try it, but there will be many just as good approaches. That's what makes woodwork so interesting.

Chris
 

madge

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thanks for the replies chaps, given me a lot to think about.

Andy, I see what you mean about the the fence getting in the way - I 'll have a go at both your suggestions and see how it works out. Do you think I could use my veritas wheel marking gauge with mortise cutters attached, run against a fence, for most of the way and then finish off the cuts with a marking knife against a straight edge when I run out of room at either end ( I don't have a bevel)?

Chris, I am tempted to also have a go with my router considering I have to make 8 of these channels per leg for 4 legs, I'm just worried about my ability to get a dead straight line without being able to use the fence (it's too long and would get in the way at either end). I could run it alongside a straight edge, I'll have a practice and see how I get on. The smallest spiral downcut router bits I can find for a 1/4 inch collet router are 1/8 inch - do spiral downcut bits come any smaller diameter than this? On second thoughts I might want the stringing slightly narrower than 1/8 inch..
 

Pete Maddex

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Hi, Madge

I think you need to make a C shaped jig that fits over the leg with a slot for a router collar to run in.
If it was a tight fit to the leg it would stop breakout at each end of the cut, and would leave a slot that you could use to line it up.

Pete
 
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