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Detail gouge, spindle gouge or mini tool.... What to get?!?!

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=Adam=

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Hi guys!

I have recently started to turn small items such as pens, light pulls, spinning tops etc and I am finding it difficult to manoeuvre my traditional 3/8 (I believe) spindle gouge, this has lead me to search for something more suitable.

Now when I looked at what Axminster had to offer I noticed that they do a detail gouge by Henry Taylor (I think), the only difference I can see with a detail as opposed to a spindle gouge is that the detail has a shallower grind, will this make much difference to the manoeuvrability?

They also offer a mini spindle gouge which is 1/4" and has a shorter handle, would this be more suitable for what I want to do?

Thanks for looking!
 

Roger C

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Hi Adam I would first try a new grind on the spindle gouge maybe a finger nail if you do not have one all ready. Next ask another turner you know or club member to see where you are going wrong as a 3/8 spindle gouge should do the trick. Regards Roger
 

chipmunk

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+1 for what Roger said - your 3/8 gouge should do all you need with the right grind.

Take a look at this video from Cindy Drozda on how she sharpens her spindle gouge...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_KDSIDAtGc

- there's nothing special about her gouge, it's just a matter of the grind and it may give you some pointers as to what to try. The nice thing about her grind is that it's freehand and jig-free.

HTH
Jon
 

Spindle

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Hi

I agree with Roger, a 3/8" spindle gouge is my first choice for turning light pulls and tops, (tend to use a 1/2" oval skew for pens). Fingernail grind will be better suited though not essential. attention to tecnique can prevent the gouge fouling the lathe.

I only find the need to move to my Sorby micro tools for miniature work.

Regards Mick
 

nev

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The green and wetter end of the M4.
that CD link is a very good, clearly demonstrated how to video.
even if the actual grind is not what one is after the the principles are well explained and can be adapted.
Thanks Jon.
 

Jonzjob

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I normally use my 1" oval skew or the 3/8" round skew I made and find that they are all that's needed from the square section blank to the finish cuts.

The big bonus is that you have a lovely finish from the tool with not much sanding needed.
 

=Adam=

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I have a 3/4" oval skew which I like to use but I find it difficult to use it for roughing out. Personally I would say that I use a roughing gouge and spindle gouge the most often just because they are fairly easy to use and they get the results that I am looking for, however I'm sure the skew method would be much quicker and better for production runs so I may look into perfecting my technique for the future!
 

Jethro

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The only tool i use for pen turning is a 1/2 " flat skew that i have ground with a radiuse, I find the radiuse grind makes the tool a lot easier to use (not so many catches) (hammer)
 

=Adam=

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A radius grind such as what captain Eddie shows? If so then I have got that on mine too!

I didnt notice much of a difference on the oval skew however it is quicker to do!
 
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