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Dealing with rotting posts- advice sought

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Tris

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Hello all,
I have a problem with rotting posts on a large rose pergola. The original installers left the concrete slightly below soil level and dished so the 6" posts are pretty thin at the base now.

I'm thinking of cutting the posts off about 6" up from soil level, hacking as much rotten wood out of the concrete as possible then driving a length of rebar in before casting a concrete block around it. The block will be 'square bell' shaped and then welding a U shaped shoe to the top of the rebar to bolt the post to.

There are established plants at the base of the posts so I want to avoid digging the original concrete out if it can be avoided.

Does this sound like a workable plan? Is there an easier way round this, has anyone done something similar and got useful tips?
TIA
Tris
 

MikeG.

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The best answer, instead of a U shaped thingamejig, is to have a steel shoe which has a small platform, smaller than the post base size, under the post, and a plate which extends upwards and is trapped in a slot in the post (bolt through the post and steel). This will enable the foot of the post to be clear of the ground and concrete, and for all rain to be able to run straight off the post without pooling anywhere.
 

Tris

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Thanks Mike, essentially an inverted T shape then, think I've seen something like that used in framing so hopefully it's something that can be bought rather than fabricated.
Hadn't thought about water holding in the U section.
Regards
Tris
 

Lons

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If you want a quick easy repair Tris then repair spikes can work pretty well if there is still solid wood in the concrete, and all you do is cut the post at ground level, hammer in the spike which goes down a corner between the wood and concrete then bolt in the post.
Come in 3x3 or 4x4" sizes and can last for a long time. I have some at my daughters' house that have been in at least 10 years.
https://www.toolstation.com/drive-in-re ... gIO4fD_BwE
 

Tris

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Hi, thanks for the replies.

Lons- I know the ones you mean, unfortunately the posts in this case are 6" square.

Woody2shoes- that's brilliant, thank you. Saves me trying to bodge something together :D
 

Lons

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I haven't seen those before Kieth thanks for posting, seem pretty expensive at £27 each though. I'd be tempted to buy 50mm steel angle iron and paint it with Hammerite.

That's where the old style bed irons you could pick up foc could have been useful. #-o That's showing my age! :lol:
 

MusicMan

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Haha I know what you mean about the old bedding posts! Yes these ones are expensive but they look as if they might do for difficult situations. In my case I have to pin an inside corner and an end post with awkward access in each case. The rest of the fence is fixed with concrete 'godfathers' but there isn't room for these in this case.

Keith
 

Lonsdale73

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Oh, that kind of rotting, didn't think posts on here - this one aside - were that rotten!
 
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