Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Cutting Worktops

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

ColG

Established Member
Joined
9 Oct 2003
Messages
99
Reaction score
0
Location
Maidenhead
I'm starting to mitre more and more laminate worktops and I have a number of queries that I hope some of you guys and gals can answer.

I use a Freud FT2000VCE coupled with Freud 1/2" straight cutters of the appropriate length.

My experiences have been varied although the end result has been Ok.

The queries I have concern the optimum settings and method of operation.

I find that the bits seem to dull pretty quickly. I never take more than a 5 - 10mm cut on each pass, always work left to right and cut with the router set at its highest speed. I also occasionally get "burning" on the tip of the bit. Is this what I should expect given the composition of the chipboard used for the worktops or should I be using a lower speed on the router? Could I be progressing the cut too fast?

Can TCT cutters be successfully sharpened and if so, do I need to go to a specialist or can they be honed at home?

Any advice greatly appreciated as screwfix are making a packet out of me in replacement cutters!!!

Cheers

Col
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
yes they can be sharpened.
near you you can get it done via issac lord in high wycombe or a company called bandsaw in windsor can do it.

chipboard is really bad for blunting cutters as it is very abrasive.

i don't think many people aim to get more than 2/3 joints cut between sharpenings.


aleks
 

Newbie_Neil

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2003
Messages
6,537
Reaction score
0
Location
Nottingham, England
Hi Aleks

You could try this, which I picked up from another site.

"When you are cutting the right hand end of a melamine board, you can enter the cut from the top front of the bullnose and work across to the other side in 15mm deep passes until you are through the worktop. But if you try to do the same when cutting the left hand end of the worktop you will instantly take out a noticable chunk of the melamine bullnose face because this time the rotation of the router will be acting still in a clockwise direction knocking away the first bit of right hand melamine it comes into contact with. The answer to that is that you still cut from the front of the worktop to the back, BUT you turn the worktop upside down."

The Trend video will take you through cutting worktops, just follow this link: - http://www.trendmachinery.co.uk/store/default.asp?cat=Videos
and spend your 3.47, presumably plus carriage.

Cheers
Neil
 

Scrit

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2002
Messages
3,872
Reaction score
0
Col

A good quality industrial TCT router cutter (e.g. Titman, Leitz, etc) should give 6 or more worktops, at least in my experience. Try reducing the amount of work your cutter needs to do by rough cutting with a jigsaw wherever possible (e.g. sink cut-outs). Also try getting a vacuum cleaner hooked up to your router as clearing the waste improves both quality of cut AND cutter life. Solid carbide spiral cutters will last longer than straights and give a much better quality cut, but they can be rather fragile (they are a lot more brittle than TCT) and you need to ensure that you don't "jink" them as they will break. Straight carbide cutters can be honed using a diamond hone between sessions, which keeps them sharper and prolongs time between sharpening sessions. These can be obtained from Trend, et al and really do make a difference.

What diameter cutters are you using? Burning is frequently an indication of a combination of factors including insuficient chip clearance, too slow feed rate, too small diameter tool, no dust extraction and poor quality tooling (in other words Chinese stuff really is cheap AND nasty). Try adding the vacuum cleaner and speeding up your feed/slowing down the spindle as this may give better results, I'd suggest 18 to 20,000 rpm as a starting point. BTW, what make are your cutters?

If you are using a lot of cutters on jobs I'd consider going to disposable carbide insert cutters, such as those sold by Wealden Tool http://www.wealdentool.net/index.html (excellent catalogue, excellent service, good quality, good prices - recommended) - the tools are more expensive, but the tips do work out cheaper in the long run if you have the volume of work.

Sharpening can generally be done by any competent saw doctor - look under Saw Sharpening Services in your area - there is no real point in going out of area for a service such as this. Locally I find that there is little price variation between sharpeners (but then in this area I am lucky enough to have a good selection of firms)

Scrit
 

Midnight

Established Member
Joined
11 Oct 2003
Messages
1,805
Reaction score
0
Location
Scotland
Col...

Sounds like you're having similar trouble to me when working with cheap ply. Personally, I'd agree with Scrit's suggestions, namely take less material with each pass (try limiting the cut to between 2-3mm) and try to increase your feed rate slightly. If you're using 1/2" bits, your motor speed's fine with the tool running flat out.
As for the "burning", I suspect that what you're seeing is an accumulation of glue from the particle board. I use Screwfix's bit cleaning spray (smells like orange oil) to remove it from my bits and saw blades; generous squirt with the bits to be cleaned layed on a cloth, left to soak for 5 mins or so and then wiped clean. A light squirt with some PTFE spray before you start cutting might slow down the glue build up.

One last thought to prolong the life of your new cutters would be to remove as much material as you dare with an older cutter, keeping the newer, sharper cutter for a final clean up pass.
Hope some of this helps..
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Thanks guys I'll certainly bear all the points in mind.

On a different topic, I ordered a Freud Diablo Laminate blade from Screwfix and they delivered the wrong blade. Not really a problem as I expected them turn it round pretty quick. However, received the replacement today and low and behold, it was the one I'd sent back. As a "premier" customer whatever that means (spend alot I suspect) they couldn't be more apologetic and agreed to send out the right blade by return.
 

Latest posts

Top