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Cutting bottom off doors

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RogerP

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I'm having tiles fitted in the kitchen and will need to remove 15mm or so from the door bottoms. I expect I'll spend ages fighting to remove six hinges (3 per door) that have been there 70 years and have completely messed up driver slots. Is there a way to cut off the bottom without removing? Would any of the oscillating tools do the job? Anyone tried - anyone know?
 

Hudson Carpentry

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The Fein Multimaster has an accessory that turns it into a c/s type of tool which may do the job.

Personally not matter how bad the screws are I would arm myself with drill bits, screw extractors, range of screwdrivers and mole grips. Renew the screws.
 

jasonB

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I'd also take the doors off, not least because it makes it a lot easier to tile if there is not a door in the way.

Tap a small old screwdriver along the slots to chase out the paint then use a well fitting screwdriver to take the old screws out, a slight tap will make sure the driver is sitting well in teh slot and also crack the hold of the screw.

You can hire door trimming saws and the Dewalt rail saw can be run on its edge.

J
 

Digit

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The Fein Multimaster
The saleman who tried to sell me one so claimed, I didn't buy so I can't confirm. Expensive way of doing the job though.

Roy.
 

RogerP

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Oh I'll get the screws out okay but just wondered if there was a different, quicker way. Being lazy I suppose! I hate these DIY jobs when there's more interesting stuff to do in the workshop :)
 

Karl

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Without question, take the doors off. Jason gives good advice on how to get the screws out. If the screws are really badly damaged, get a tin-opening chisel the same width as the screw head, and whack it into the slot. That should cut into the metal sufficiently to be able to turn it enough to loosen.

You say that you are having the floor tiled - I presume it is being done by somebody else? Perhaps they're expecting to have to take the doors off?
 

MickCheese

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Digit":1o3wfbpz said:
The Fein Multimaster
The saleman who tried to sell me one so claimed, I didn't buy so I can't confirm. Expensive way of doing the job though.

Roy.
I have one of these and whilst I am sure it can do it, getting a straight and true cut at the bottom of a hung door would not, in my opinion, be easy.

I would persevere and remove the door.

Mick
 

Hudson Carpentry

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An old trick after you have your slot to put a screw driver in is to tighten the screw slightly. This brakes the bond. Use the longest screw driver you have so you have more torque in the shaft.
 

Karl

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Hudson Carpentry":2bzgxozq said:
Use the longest screw driver you have so you have more torque in the shaft.
:shock:

Now I remember a thread a few years back where pretty much every man and his dog argued that a longer screwdriver shaft provided no more "torque" than a short handled one. I argued that you could tighten a screw tighter with a longer shafted screwdriver than a short one. Seems i'm not alone after all 8)
 

Hudson Carpentry

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Indeed karl. Torque may not be the correct word (to me it is) but you get a stubby screwdriver with a decent size handle tighten a screw, then use the longest one you have and you can feel the difference.
 

9fingers

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Screwdriver efficiency is simply the ratio of the handle diameter to the tip width.
I suspect the impression of long screwdrivers being 'better' is that long ones tend to have bigger handles.

The screwdriver I like best in my collection is an ancient London Pattern handled beast. Fits my hand just right maybe 'cos I'm a London Pattern boy?

Bob
 

Paul Chapman

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Karl":38asb7t5 said:
Seems i'm not alone after all 8)
I'm with you, Karl - a long screwdriver has far more torque (or whatever you want to call it) than a short one.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 

RogerP

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Karl":1kfsg4ob said:
You say that you are having the floor tiled - I presume it is being done by somebody else? Perhaps they're expecting to have to take the doors off?
That would be nice :) but probably not.

Karl wrote:
Seems i'm not alone after all 8)
I'm with you, Karl - a long screwdriver has far more torque (or whatever you want to call it) than a short one.

Paul
I think it's because with a large long driver it's easier to keep it straight in the slot whilst applying force.
 

No skills

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As above dig the paint out of the screw head with a small chisel, hold the correct sized screwdriver bit in the screw and give a good whack with a hammer - sometimes (with luck) the screw bit will bite into the screw and stay there. I prefer to use a regular cordless drill to remove these stuck screws, gives me the chance to put my back against the other side of the door frame and really push on the drill, a quick dab or two on the trigger should break the seal/bond of the screw - then slowly wind out the screw on slowest speed.
I have tried my impact drivers for this but they didnt work that well, the initial higher impact torque sometimes snaps the screw heads clean off (do you feel lucky? :) ).

FWIW
 

AndyT

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A quick search confirmed that there is a special tool for this - the Janser Door Trimmer - but they seem to be £300 so may not be worth it unless you want to take up door trimming professionally. I did also find an outfit doing just door trimming as a standalone service, but based in Dorset, and not covering Essex.

So I'd go for the painted screw removal - and just think how much neater the hinges will be when you have put them back without all the layers of paint - not that anyone else will notice!
 

Hudson Carpentry

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If a pro came into my house and started trimming a door with a tool made for the job while the door is hung I think I would be worried and maybe ask him to do it the correct way. Then again after looking it does say "if the carpet fitter". I would be impressed if a carpet fitter got that tool out and did it. Strange that...
 

Harbo

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Torque has nothing to do with length - it's the wider handle of the longer driver that generates more torque.
The bigger the radius, the more torque is generated (lbsft).

Rod
 

Paul Chapman

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Harbo":2d2ehoiw said:
Torque has nothing to do with length - it's the wider handle of the longer driver that generates more torque.
The bigger the radius, the more torque is generated (lbsft).
I find that hard to believe, Rod. If you look at this photo of my Yankee screwdrivers



while there is some difference in the width of the handles, I wouldn't say that it is particularly significant. However, there is a tremendous difference in the ability of the largest Yankee to drive or remove screws compared with the smaller sizes. I would say that the difference is more to do with their length.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 
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