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Cutting a circle ?

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Dog

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Can you use a router to cut a circle from 1" thick spruce with a 6" diameter or is it advisable to use something else ?
 

Bean

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Dog I have a Jasper Jig which will cut circles up to 7 or 8 inch. I have not had the chance to use it yet. I know DaveL has one and has used it. He will be able to answer this post.

Bean
 

Dewy

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You should be able to cut a circle with a trammel arm on the router or make a simple circle cutting jig out of 6mm ply and a point (nail)
cut a hole in the ply for the cutter to fit through and drill for the fixing screws to the router base plate. put a point for the circle centre offset from the router centre allowing for the cutter radius. put the point in the timber to be cut then revolve around to cut the circle. Route a bit deeper with each cut til the depth is reached. You could also rough cut the circle with a saw before finishing with the router.
 

Chris Knight

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Richard,

You can use any size bit within reason as long as the radius from the centre of your point to the edge of the bit (ie where it will leave the cut edge of the circle) is what you want. However, I would use a quarter inch bit - there is less spruce to cut and therefore a generally easier job.

A straight cutter or a spiral up cut bit would work fine.

For a one-off job, I simply screw a bit of 3mm hardboard to my router base and stick a brad through the hardboard into the workpiece. If I absolutely cannot tolerate a hole in the workpiece, I stick the brad through a bit of thin wood and use doublesided tape to stick that to the workpiece. In that case you have to "crank" the temporary router base, making something that looks a little like frying pan where the router sits on the "pan" and the nail goes through the "handle".

There are similar methods to use bandsaw or even a table saw to cut out circles, I can probably find a reference if you need one.
 

Alf

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If you have a drill bit the same size as your guide bush that makes an even easier way to "attach" your router to your bit of MDF/ply with its nail pivot point. Also means you don't get the power cord twisted round the machine as you go round. Like Chris, I use a 1/4" bit.

Cheers, Alf
 

Dog

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Well I've taken a little bit of all your advice and managed to successfully cut a circle with my router. One day I'll stop asking questions, can't promise when though :)
 

DaveL

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Richard,

Glad you have done the job.

Yes the Jasper jig does this very easily. You do need a pilot hole for the centre pin to locate in. The main reason I got the jig is it can be used to cut small discs ie less than the size of the base of the router. It is repeatable and needs very little setting up.
 

desmoengine

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richard
never stop asking questiones , everbody can benfit from the the variety of useful replies.

Dave W
 

Dog

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I doubt I'll ever stop asking questions but not today as it's my birthday and time to go chew a few bones, sink a good few pints and generally do absolutely nothing :D
 

DaveL

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Richard,

Many happy returns :D

Jelly and ice cream latter :wink:

Of course this entitles you to a whole new years worth of answers, you just have to think up the questions 8)
 

Alf

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Many happy returns, Richard. Keep asking the questions; you won't be the only one who learns something. :D

Cheers, Alf
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi Richard, ney Dog

Happy birthday. 21 at last eh? :wink:

I have just had a cold pint of Murphy's in celebration of your day.

Cheers

Tony
 

Dewy

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desmoengine":247cqk3t said:
richard
never stop asking questiones , everbody can benfit from the the variety of useful replies.

Dave W
There is one stupid question.
It's the one you don't ask.
 

Dog

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Thanks for all the good wishes. 21, I wish, just turned 38 but still have a mental age of 3 and IQ to match :D

Congratulations to the new Moderators, enjoy yourselves!
 

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