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Cutting 12mm thick solid laminate worktops

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Hornbeam

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I need to rip some 3m laminate tops down.
Can anybody recommend the most suitable blade.
I was thinking a 12 inch 96T TCG for the table saw (which I already have) but will also need to do some cutting on site with a hand circular (165mm blade).
Any recommendations please
Thanks
Ian
 

custard

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I don't have a huge amount experience, but I have done it a few times. Even with an ATB blade I found it quite tricky to avoid chipping, not chipping as in massive spelchy mess, more chipping as in tiny flakes that came away from the cut line. I've tried cutting through masking tape and it didn't fully cure the problem. The only way I could deal with it (other than a scoring blade on a panel saw) was with a dedicated laminate blade.
 

Distinterior

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As Custard has suggested,....A negative rake Triple Chip laminate blade in a tracksaw is the best option.
That 12mm solid laminate is tough and particularly hard on cutters and blades. Take it slow and allow the blade to cut at it's own speed.....dont push it too hard.!
 

Alpha-Dave

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A friend asked me to cut up their left over material from their new kitchen to make placemats and coasters. I initially tried the oldest blade I had because I heard that this stuff ruins blades with the intention of using a better one if needed. Honestly it cut really slowly, but it kept going.
It was really smelly though, even with good extraction under the table, with the crown guard and a filter in the room. I’m not touching that stuff again unless it’s a really good reason.

I followed the manufacture’s guidance and taped all the surfaces with masking tape before cutting to avoid chip out. No idea if it helped, but I didn’t get any.

0E8761B8-1D21-4795-890C-E8CA55B86AD4.jpeg
 

Distinterior

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The problem that you can get when cutting that type of material with a saw blade, especially with a blade with the wrong type of tooth configuration ...is very distinct kerf mark's on the edges which, no disrespect intended, can clearly be seen in your pictures.

These can be sanded away but as you've found, it's hard working the material. You would be better off routing .5mm off each edge to create a tidy clean finish on all the edges. Once the kerf mark's are gone, a rub with an oiled rag will bring out the solid core colour to a far better consistent finish.

If the cut up sections are going to be used as placemats and coasters, they will be on show......
 

julianf

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When I program CNC tool paths on expensive alloy parts that need a good cosmetic finish, I leave quarter of a millimeter on the part, and then shave it off at the end of the job, using the side of the cutter.

If I was wanting a good finish on a 12mm wood part, I would use exactly the same technique - rough cut and then skim the part to size with the side of a router bit.

I'm not really a wood worker, but I assumed that was the standard way of doing things?
 

porker

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I have some Caldeira Zenith solid laminate to cut down as splashbacks for the new kitchen. The info I found suggested using a triple chip laminate blade as previously mentioned in my TS55. I was going to go for the Key Blades as I've heard good things about them and they are a little cheaper than Festool's own blade. The manufacturers suggest taking the cut in a number of 4mm passes.
I also have a few sockets to cut out in it and was thinking of drilling and rough cutting with a jigsaw and cleaning up with a router using a template. Does this sound reasonable?
 

Distinterior

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In principle, that sounds okay but it is not advisable to use a jigsaw on this type of material....Use a TC tipped blade or router cutter for any cuts.
 
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