Clear coat over stain problem.

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Ollie78

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I am making a guitar kit ( electric ) for my Son at the moment.
The body has a thin figured maple veneer on the front which we want to stain in a fade like this sort of thing
The body not the fancy neck and headstock.

1676064025701.png


I have bought some Chestnut spirit stains and done a couple of practice runs on little offcuts, I think I can do the staining Ok.

The issue is that today I tested a spray can of clear coat I bought from a car paint place and it caused the dye to sort of re-activate with the solvent, I did spray a bit heavily which was partly why I wanted to do some testing and this actually caused the dye to run a bit.
I think if it were a solid colour I wouldn`t worry but due to the fade effect it could be a disaster.
Thought about wiping on shellac but a no go because its alcohol stain and will smear, I could do an oil finish which I would quite like but my son says he wants it really shiny (and better to be durable).

In hindsight maybe I should have bought water based dye but because the veneer is thin I didn`t want to raise the grain to keep sanding minimal.
Is there a trick to sealing the stain before lacquering ?
Maybe I could do a few really fine sort of mist coats ?
Don`t want to mess it up.

Thanks

Ollie
 
Sorry can’t help much, but looks amazing, you’ll be the coolest dad in town making your boy an electric guitar! Someone who can help will undoubtedly be along soon.
 
Is there a trick to sealing the stain before lacquering ?
Maybe I could do a few really fine sort of mist coats ?
Don`t want to mess it up.
You've basically solved or guessed at a solution to the problem yourself. So, yes, spray a quickly applied spit coat over your dyed/stained surface, one that flashes off quickly so that the lacquer doesn't have enough wet time to reactivate the dye. This should be a thick enough coating of lacquer to prevent subsequent coat applications being able to reactivate the colourant beneath. You might need to do a couple of such spit coats with a light denibbing between coats with 400 -600 grit abrasive paper. Slainte.
 
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