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Chiseling to the line.

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garywayne

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At collage last monday we had to do a "half lap dove tail" joint. I have no problems doing the joint, except chiseling to the line.

In class we use a knife, (as we are trainee furniture makers), and not a pencil accept for the dove tail.Sorry for the rambling. I put the chisel to the line or in the knife mark and push down away from the stock and gradually par back to the mark that goes down the side of the stock. Does that make sense? What usually happens is that I undercut the mark down the side or along the top. No matter how careful I am, I cock it up.

I'm sorry for the explanation, if you have any questions feel free to ask.

Can anyone put me right, or is it down to pure practice? Please tell me that there is a secret that you are willing to share with me.

ATB, Gary.
 

Alf

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garywayne":1npy3q4t said:
I put the chisel to the line or in the knife mark and push down away from the stock and gradually par back to the mark that goes down the side of the stock. Does that make sense?
Erm... :-k

I expect most of it's practice, but it may also be that you're not paring away as much stuff as possible shy of the knifed line before registering the chisel in aforementioned knifed line and taking your final paring cut. But I may well have misunderstood what you meant. :oops:

Cheers, Alf
 

Howjoe

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Hi Gary,

I did this last year...exactly the same, a half lap dove tail. The way I was taught to do it, was to mark the tail with a knife & pencil, then cut the shoulder and lap with a saw and then cut half way down the tail to the line, so as to remove some of the resistance (if that makes sense). Paring with the chisel was the trickiest to learn, and it took a a lot of practice. The advice I was given was ensure the chisel is razor sharp, straight edged, take your time......and get lots of practice. I'm STILL practicing!

When I got some decent chisels of my own and didn't have to use the colleges 'butter' knives, this made a big difference.

Cheers

Howard
 

Scott

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Hi Gary

I'm getting the impression from your description (maybe getting it wrongly though!) that you are paring the waste off at an angle to the vertical and then trying to pare the last of it vertically (?). If so, I always find it easier to do all my paring cuts vertically. It helps to get in the habit of getting absolute vertical.

Also, placing an engineer's square behind the work as a visual reference for vertical is a help (a la DavidC!)

As Alf says, you need to get rid of as much waste as possible before registering the chisel in the knife line for the final paring cut (and if you're really being posh you'll have re-honed the chisel for this last cut!), otherwise the bevel works against the resistance of the remaining waste and pushes the tip of the chisel inward and hey presto, you've undercut!

Hopefully some of that will be understandable or of some use! :D
 

garywayne

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Thank you both for such rapid replys.

So, no secrets then!

I suppose I'd better get on with my next years practice then.

Thanks peeps, keep good.

ATB, Gary.
 

tim

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Scott":21s7fd29 said:
otherwise the bevel works against the resistance of the remaining waste and pushes the tip of the chisel inward and hey presto, you've undercut!
That's exactly it.

T
 

philpolish

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Hi Gary
Why dont you ask your tutor for another demonstration he must know how to do it. Dont be shy to ask if you dont understand, You will find there are little things you pick up along the way to make things easier but you tutor will allready know these so study what he is doing carefully and you will learn a lot.

I finished a two year course last year so I know were your coming from all the best.
Phil.
 

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