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JFC

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Im having real trouble with the timber chipping when im cutting a rebate on the router table . Ive used a marking gauge to try and limit it but this doesn't seem to stop alot of the chips going over and damaging the work . I put a new cutter in today and it wasn't that . I found a slower speed on the router helps but doesn't stop it . Any tips ? Please .
 

Scott

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Are you cutting across the grain? If so then clamp a piece of waste to the end of it so that the waste breaks out at the end of the cut and not the workpiece
 

jasonB

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Try a larger diameter cutter and or less depth of cut per pass, aim for less than half the diameter of the bit.

Or use your spindle with a rebating block equiped with scribing cutters :D

Jason
 

Philly

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Try taking really small amounts off with each go.
I had some tropical timber that was tearing itself to pieces on the router table. In the end I had to to take less than a mm of at a time.
Got there in the end though!
Philly :D
 

JFC

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Ive tried every cutter every speed but not 1mm per cut , i was hoping it wouldn't come to that :x
Im not to happy with the spindal until i get a good fence with all the gubbings to hold the work to the fence , my home made mdf fence doesnt work well with a spindal moulder :lol:
 

jasonB

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What wood are you cutting? and whats the rebate size?

Jason
 

JFC

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American white oak and the rebate is to hold a 464d/g unit around 25mm x 16mm but is getting bigger :lol: but i get the same problem with meranti and stock red wood , not normally a problem because its painted so i can fill the chips but this one has to be spot on . Its not small chips , i can hear the timber tearing as i push it past the cutter .
It only chips on the top part of the cutter not the cutting edge but ive used a planer cutter from magnate and after seeing your post on replacable blades went a bought 1 today and it has a cutting edge on the top but still have chipping ....... maybe its time to give tescos a call and ask if they need any more shelf stackers :lol:
 

MikeW

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It kinda of sounds as if there is excessive runout on the shaft, or the bit is in someway off center in the collet.

I do Meranti all the time in big bites. WO as well. I do sometimes make a shallow first pass and then either full depth or a bit less and a clean up pass if I am going really deep/wide.

Also, are you using a straight cutter or a rabbeting cutter that has some down cut to it or a spiral?

Maybe an apples/oranges thing as each piece of wood can have its own character. But I would check the spindle and collet.

Mike
 

Chris Knight

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If the wood is not very straight grained, you might experience tear-out as the cut tries to propagate along the grain direction. A couple of things you might try,

1. Cut the "other side " of the rebate - this would require you to change the bit setting and feed the wood in the opposite direction which might help.

2. Depending how confident you are in the use of the router table, you could try climb-cutting. Use a good feather board and take small cuts only. Take care doing this, it is easy for the wood to get away from you.
 

JFC

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Ive tried all types of bits but not a spiral down cutter , DandM didnt have one in stock . Ive got the XX in the collet so all should be true but i will reset it before i take my final cut trying the other side method . I did try climb milling it but thought it a bit to risky finger wise :shock:
 

tim

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JFC":2edg4gb1 said:
Ive got the XX in the collet so all should be true
Its fairly possible that thats the problem. If its slightly out of centre then the router cutter will in effect bang into the timber as it rotates in an oval path. Try a test cut without the XX and see what happens then.

I don't have one but I do have a couple of eliminator chucks - which are really good as long as you get them set up right. If you don't, you get almost exactly what you described.

Cheers

Tim
 

JFC

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I tried it without the XX and still got chipping but not as bad maybe the XX was out a little . Still its back in and balanced again . I went to a local joiner i know and had a chat with him and as soon as i said AWO he groaned :( He said the same as Jason , spindle block with a scribe cutter . They should make a router cutter like that . I steered clear of the rebates today to give me some thinking time and i think ill run them off on the table saw and clean them up by hand . Thanks for the tips and any more advice is welcome :D
 

Sgian Dubh

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JFC, I have no idea what either a 464d/g or an XX that you mention in a couple of your posts are, but the chip out you describe can certainly be a bit of a problem when routing. It happens in all sorts of timbers and is sometimes an indication of cutting into rising grain on the edge, but not always. Pines of different types are some of the worst woods for doing this and this is often caused by the distinct differences in hardness between the softer spring growth and harder summer growth. Ring porous hardwoods usually exhibit a similar hard and soft growth pattern.

You've tried the breaking the grain trick with a marking gauge, but did you scribe the line deep enough? It usually requires a heavy score to really be effective.

Climb cutting is another option, but this is something I'd strongly recommend you don't do on an inverted router table unless you have a power feeder. Without a power feeder it's all too easy to get your fingers sucked into the cutter. Climb cutting with a hand held router I actually find safer in many respects because you can use the technique to take light cuts to just skim off the outer edge of the wood in two or three stages followed by a normal cut.

In a router table most people set the width of cut first. Once they've got the width of cut set they then gradually raise the router to the chosen depth of cut. Try doing the depth and width setting in a different order, i.e., set the depth of cut correctly and take a very light first cut on the edge. Sneak the fence at the back away from the cutter a bit at a time to get the width of cut. This often helps.

You can often also approach the settings using the edge of the board on the table and the face up against the fence. This way can work well too, but you need to make an assessment of the grain pattern to decide.

That's enough tricks to try to go on with. Slainte.
 

SlimShavings

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Sometimes after I get set up I use a spacers on each side of the fence and just do a real shallow climb cut. 1mm or less. You can do this by hand safely. Then do your regular cut.
 

Alf

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Sgian Dubh":1xe3ff74 said:
JFC, I have no idea what either a 464d/g
Double glazing unit I think.

Sgian Dubh":1xe3ff74 said:
or an XX that you mention in a couple of your posts are
Extreme Extension router collet. Spelling evidently isn't its strongest suite. :D

Is this a good moment to mention how safe it is to do a climb cut on the Woodrat? No, I thought it probably wasn't.

Cheers, Alf
 

Sgian Dubh

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I couldn't say on the climb cutting thing with a Woodrat Alf. I've never used one. Still, climb cutting is a legitimate technique, but you really need to know what you're about to attempt it safely. It's not a technique for the inexperienced.

Thanks for the enlightenment on the acronyms though. Slainte.
 

JFC

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Sorry 464d/g is indeed a 4mm glass 6mm cavity 4mm glass double glazed unit and the xx is as Alf says . I could climb mill on the Erm Legacy #-o but the tear out has already happened so i dont think it will work and i cant risk having to redo all my hard work and buy more 100 x 50 oak . However i do have another 4 of these doors to make so may try the climb milling method and other methods you kind folk have advised on .
 

JFC

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Your not actually allowed to use 4 6 4 now it has to be 4 16 4 .... i think with either k or soler glass on the inside but as these doors are going on a passenger ferry or the like i can get away with it . Anyway i had to cut the rebate for the raised panels today and hey presto no chipping :? so i followed the rebate through and recut the glass rebates , no chipping or very little :D seems a smaller cutter at higher speed and using the side of the cutter rather than the side and top is the way to go , or sort the spindle moulder out :lol: Now to try and add a pic of the door .....
 
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