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Johnboy

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After reading that several members use Turbocad I had a look on Ebay and there are 3 versions on sale, v8, v9 and v10 at a fiver for v8, £40 for v9 and £80 for v10. Is it worth paying for the latest version or are the earlier versions OK.

TIA

John
 

Chris Knight

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John, one of the annoying things about Turbocad is their propensity for introducing new versions just about the time you get to grips with the previous one. I used to keep up until I abandoned Turbocad for a solid modelling package at version 7.

Version 8 will do 2D just fine and also some 3D if you are prepared for the learning curve. I have designed quite complicated pieces on versions 7 and below. I suggest you spend only the fiver at this stage until you decide you really need more functionality.
 

RogerS

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John

I asked about planning and CAD recently here and not sure whether you've read. https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/view ... highlight=

I tried quite a few packages and eventually came down to the conclusion that all the packages were far too complicated for what I wanted to achieve and so I abandoned them in favour of graph paper.

I wrestled with this for ages (and I can hear the siren song yet again to go out and try if I can find a simple package with a small learning curve!)

Cheers Roger
 

houtslager

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Well John,
i've been using TurboCad since it was first released in 1800 and went up to v 4 before the original makers went bust, then it was on both PC and MAC formats.
Since 1999 it was marketed by IMSI and they improved it from v4 to the current v10.
I currently use v7 - it was a free version from a PC mag :D ,great for BASIC designs and doing the details of joints.As for 3d :oops: I still have to give it a try out.
Why so lazy, I learnt Tech. drawing to A level standard and find that 2d OK for my own use, 3d I tend to do freehand and colour in for client presentation.
Still my advise is get the free or very cheap version and start there.
 

Keith Smith

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John I've got version9, it is fine for 2D but I'm finding 3D fiendishly difficult to master effectively.

I have just finished my first series of 3D drawings, unless I get to do a lot more soon I will have forgotten how the heck I did them and be back to square one.

I don't think it is possible to post them on here :? :?:

Another problem with constant upgrades is that I was sent a load of drawings recently, written with TC10 and of course couldn't open them. :evil:
 

johnelliott

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I've got V8 and have an occasional go at it. I would consider using it more seriously but only if I could get someone to teach me how to use it on a one-to-one basis. No way would I try to learn it myself, it's can do an awful lot of stuff, 9/10 of which I would never need
John
 

RogerS

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Interesting but why is it that the bloated featuritis in most software packages is inversely proportional to finding a book that tells you what you actually want to know?

As part of setting up my business and website I have had to 'learn' all manner of different packages. It seems to me that books either are those that simply go through what each item in the menu does (I can work that out for myself, thanks) or, in the case of Photoshop for example, display all sorts of arty stuff that I have no need for. Seems to be nowt in the middle range.

And as for those books for Dummies....aaaargh....why use ten words when 1000 will suffice ...full of patronising US .....aaaargh.

Am just about to hop on a train down t'smoke and I will be reading Scott Landid's book on workbenches. Now ..there's a decent book!
 

tombo

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John,

ive been researching cad via what has been discussed on this forum, a lot rate sketchup so i downloaded it and followed the video tutorials on the web site. I was pretty quickly (< 1hour) drawing houses with dormer windows and all sorts of bump outs and extensions. But I then tried to sketch tv unit with doors and sort of got stuck. I could not see an easy way to show the detail that i would need for joints etc. So I have just bagged a copy of turbocad 9 on ebay for £20 inc postage. I know it can do what i want and at that price i can afford to go back to pen and paper.

Tom
 

ColG

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Tut tut!! :lol: isn't this a little like the dilema between whether to use a hand tool to do the job or the latest powertool?

I'm formerly of the IT fraternity and used/sold/supported a variety of CAD packages but find far more satisfaction in sitting at the drawing board and drawing by hand. Not to say I don't use software for designing, I use a very good package called KitchenDraw for designing kitchens and bathrooms for quotations.
 
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Anonymous

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Kitchen draw is free for the first 30 hours use and then you pay a small charge to recharge your hours go to http://www.kitchendraw.com/index.htm and check it out its one of the easiest kitchen and bathroom design prorammes out there definatley worth a look.
 

Johnboy

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Thanks for all the replies. I think I will try version 8 and see how I get on. I use a solid modelling package at work (SDRC-Ideas) but it is about £4000/year for a licence :shock: If I don't get on with it I guess it is back to the drawing board, literally.

John
 
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Anonymous

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Turbocad is unbelievably powerful, but as others have said, the learning curve for 3d work is great. I started off just like you, with version 7 standard. If you register it with Imsi, you will soon get some special offers emailed to you. I have version 10 Pro now, and use it almost every day.
No matter which cad package you go with, stick with it. They will all be hard to use at first, but will only get easier!
Although not woodwork related, here is something I drew up in TC version 8.
 

Aragorn

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Hey Kong - Welcome to the forum. That looks fantastic.
Something for the kitchen, is it? :D
 
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Anonymous

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Thanks guys for the welcome ;)

Did somebody say kitchen? Not one of my best pieces of work, but TC will do all of your architectural work too!

 
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Anonymous

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Yep, I use 10 Pro. The engine took aruound 12 hours, but the kitchen didn't take that long. Once you get one cabinet in place, it should be a matter of copy/paste with a couple of boolean subtracts to get the cabinet to the size required. I am more than happy to answer questions on CAD if you have them :lol:
 

Mcluma

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He Derek681

That Kitchendraw.com IS PERFECT, If i had it only found sooner,

Looked at the demo, and yes even i can work with it :wink:

so you can also do bathrooms with it?? :?:

McLuma
 
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