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Burr bowl

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Noggsy

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Time for me to show and tell I think. Here is a brown mallee burr bowl. I haven't oiled it yet, but it has had several coats of shellac sealer. It's only the second burr I've tried and the first ogee shape, so I'm fairly pleased with it.

Constructive criticism would be very welcome.





 

CHJ

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Another turning obstacle tackled and achieved, personally would not have sealed the wood with shellac if intending to apply an oil finish.
The shellac will stop the oil penetrating and you will only have a very thin skin of cured oil on the surface which will rub off very quickly.

Oil is normally applied to bare wood so that it can penetrate and give some nourishment to dry and burr wood and form a firm bond when and if* it cures. (*curing dependant on blend/type of oil)

I personally would stick with your shellac and buff it up as a friction polish.
 

Noggsy

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Cheers for the feedback Chas...I do need to experiment with different finishes.
 

paulm

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Looks good Noggsy. As Chas said on the finish, personally I like a nice matt finish from oil direct on the bare timber and maybe adding a couple of coats of wax after after if I want something more shiny, but shellac buffed up, with some wax after if wanted, is good too.

If feeling brave maybe could be taken a touch thinner, and maybe the base more rounded and less pronounced, but that's really minor changes to a really nice piece and depends on personal preferences as always.

Cheers, Paul
 

Noggsy

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Thanks Paul. I'm not overly happy with the base either, it was the first foot which I have taken off using reverse-chucking and then sanding and I realised once I took it off the lathe that I hadn't rounded it properly. I did think about trying to round it in a lathe mounted drill chuck and sanding disc, but I was concerned about losing the concentricity. Is there a way get this right, other than by trial and error and a good eye?

I'm really enjoying playing with burrs, a very different kind of turning.
 

boysie39

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Thats a very good first effort at that type of turning Noggsy ,Chas and Paul have both pointed you in the right direction although you make the final decision as to what you like.
 

paulm

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Noggsy":19v15y2l said:
Thanks Paul. I'm not overly happy with the base either, it was the first foot which I have taken off using reverse-chucking and then sanding and I realised once I took it off the lathe that I hadn't rounded it properly. I did think about trying to round it in a lathe mounted drill chuck and sanding disc, but I was concerned about losing the concentricity. Is there a way get this right, other than by trial and error and a good eye?

I'm really enjoying playing with burrs, a very different kind of turning.
For irregular shaped bowls I use a friction drive support held in the chuck, made of a wood cylinder a few inches long with a larger diameter at the non-chuck end and covered in foam and a bit of router mat. This sits inside the bowl and then bring the tailstock up against the other side of the bowl to apply a bit of pressure (may need something to avoid marking the base) and hold the bowl in place. May need a bit of fiddling to get it centred, then proceed to turn at very low speed and with gentle fine cuts to avoid the bowl flying off ! Final sanding/blending of curves can be done by hand off of the lathe.

Hope that makes sense ? Easier to do than explain !

Cheers, Paul
 
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