Quantcast

Bowl Interior Query

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

modicon

Member
Joined
15 Feb 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Location
Aberdeen
Afternoon,

Was wondering if any kind folk out there could point me in the right direction. Quite new to turning and am a bit stuck as to what is going to happen when I try and turn the interior of the bowl as shown in the attachments? Photo 3 probably shows what I mean best

As you can see at some point I'm going to be hitting the side of the wood thats not linear on the way down. Not bothered that it will create a hole (more decorative than for eating my soup from!).

Am wondering how easy this is going to do as I'm imagining loads of catches? Is it a total no go? I'm thinking I could always change the whole lot into a table light. I just cant see how when scooping out the interior the tool isnt going to go through and make a right old mess of the bowl.... and me.

Thanks for any help
 

Attachments

That would work

Established Member
Joined
29 Dec 2018
Messages
604
Reaction score
10
Location
Dartford
You will be turning fresh air momentarily it's true but don't worry as it's such a tiny period of time it won't feel any different. Just be sure you stick to basic good practice.... keep the bevel rubbing etc.
 

Alpha-Dave

Established Member
Joined
18 May 2015
Messages
167
Reaction score
18
Location
Durham
1) If you are using a tool that you push into the wood so that it cuts with its top edge such as a scraper and a lot of the carbide tools then you risk pushing it through the hole like putting a stick in a bike wheel. That won’t end well.

2) If you are using a bowl gouge where the cutting edge is rotated so you are cutting with the tip, but with the flute at about 2 o’clock and the bevel rubbing the area just cut (rubbing, not being pushed in to), the you will be fine cutting air: I do winged bowls and rough wood that is up to 50 % air, other people do even more.

However I have seen people on Youtube use bowl gouges like scrapers by jamming the tip into the wood, this easily results in a catch due to the sharp edge ‘self feeding’ into the wood: this is where once it bites, it wants to go further into the wood rather than either cutting the same thickness or being pushed out of the wood.

Using a bowl gouge ‘correctly’, you will be fine. ‘Incorrectly’ will have issues. I always recommend hands-on lessons.
 

modicon

Member
Joined
15 Feb 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Location
Aberdeen
Ok thats great thanks. You describe exactly what I had in mind, stick through a bike wheel! I'll be using a bowl gouge with the bevel rubbing so will take it easy when I'm coming up to the bad part.
Must admit I'm not having much luck with scrapers on other bowls so far. Keep getting catches and no idea why so have kept away from them for now. Tool is sharp, held in the trailing position and it still digs in. Like always just need a bit more practise.

Thanks for the advice.
 

CHJ

Established Member
Joined
31 Dec 2004
Messages
20,073
Reaction score
37
Location
Cotswolds UK
Don't fixate on the hole; whether using a scraper or a bevel rubbing gouge just make sure to have good tool control on the rest with a sharp tool and let the the tool cut at its own rate, do not push it into the wood.
Run the blank as fast as you feel safe, the faster it spins the less time there is for the hand/tool pressure to spring into any cavity. Think of it as riding over pot holes, the faster you go the less the wheel will drop in the hole and skip over the top.

As an aside, I see you have already attempted to finish the outside, whatever you do in hollowing it out finish off the outer edge turning as you go, the bowl WILL go out of round as you remove material, don't try to go back to the outer edge.
Coping with such distortion is not easy for an experienced turner, let alone someone new to the subject.
 

modicon

Member
Joined
15 Feb 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Location
Aberdeen
Great advice Chas thanks. The bowl has indeed gone out of true. I must be a couple of mill away from breaking through, chickened out of going any further today!! #-o
 

Dalboy

Established Member
Joined
18 Sep 2008
Messages
3,734
Reaction score
17
Location
Canterbury United Kingdom
As mentioned turn it as fast as safely possible with small inclusions like you have you may not even feel it if you keep the tool presented correctly.

In future turn, the outside on one day and leave it on the lathe when you are ready to do the inside quickly touch up the outside to confirm it is round and then turn the inside to completion in one go on the same day. Movement occurs more so if the wood is not completley dry. With kiln dried wood there is less chance of the wood moving.

When doing the inside start by turning the first inch down to completion then move to the next inch this will give much more stability. Once complete do not return to the top again.
As a novice sanding is best done with the lathe stopped if there are inclusions.
I have turned some quite big pieces with inclusions to the point of there being more air than wood but these are not for the faint-hearted and also without taking safety precautions.

For example this piece.

DSCF8334 (800x600).jpg
 

Attachments

modicon

Member
Joined
15 Feb 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
0
Location
Aberdeen
Thanks Dalboy, some good top tips in there that I didnt know. The piece you posted looks great and gives me some confidence it might actually work!
I'd once turned the outside of a bowl then went away on holiday, came back and couldn't believe the distortion.
 
Top