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Mykee

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I have just bought a Bosch 1200 AE Router and I think I have misunderstood the preset depth of cut ability. Does it mean that I have to use the step buffer to set each depth required, turn off the machine between each cut, turn the step buffer to the next preset depth, then do my next cut?

Many thanks
Mike O.
 

sunnybob

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Yes, unless you feel you have too many fingers. :shock: :lol:
 

Sgian Dubh

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You can do it that way if you prefer, but there's really no need if you develop the ability to freehand judge each step of the plunge until you reach your final depth, as controlled by the depth stop. So, for example, if you're using a 12 mm diameter cutter to create a rebate, housing, or trench that's, say 12 mm deep, set the depth stop to achieve this, and then take two to four small plunges to get to that depth. A useful guide is to aim to increase the cut depth by approximately the radius of the cutter, or a bit less. For a 12 mm diameter cutter aim to increase the depth of cut in roughly 6 mm increments, for a 6 mm cutter aim for roughly 3 mm plunges. However, you should also be guided by the amount of material you're taking away, and how hard this makes the router work, especially if you're working with large diameter cutters, because the larger the diameter of the cutter the greater is the risk of kickback, e.g., a 25 mm or 30 mm diameter cutter requires even greater caution and vigilance than perhaps a relatively small cutter.

To set the required cutter depth, zero the tip of the cutter by placing the switched off router's base on the material to be cut, plunge the non-rotating cutter to touch the surface of the material, and then trap something of known size between the stepped rotatable turret attached to the router base, and the adjustable depth stop, then lock the stop. For example, a 9 mm drill bit used this way will give you a 9 mm deep cut.

On a final note, for you to be asking such a question suggests very strongly to me that you have little or no experience using routers. They can cause significant injuries in inexperienced hands, and if my suspicions are correct I strongly suggest you seek guidance from an experienced and skilled user - be wary of what can be viewed about router use on places like youtube - there are a lot of clowns out there only too happy to demonstrate confidently to all and sundry their stupidity, incompetence, and fondness for dangerous router techniques. Slainte.
 

Bm101

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On my makita it has a wheel on the depth stop that you can tighten. If you loosen it off and push the button it frees the depth stop. Or you wind it down by hand on the thread. Each turn equates to a certain increase in depth for the bit. If you are asking advice on routers I would add that most sensible advice I have read (as another beginner on a router) suggests 3 mm incremental stages of cut depth are adequate. Once you know the machine and it's tolerances then....
Apologies if I'm teaching Grandma to suck eggs. But I doubt that I am.
Grinders I will gladly use drunk. No I shouldn't say it that way, it's just not true. But there's a grain of truth in there. Familiarity might breed contempt but it also breeds competence when you look at it the right way.
My routers I am not scared of but I am cautious. The plug comes out every single time I adjust. 3200 rpms. Yeh. You're all right. I'll take it slowly.

Edit: cross posted with Richard
 

Trainee neophyte

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Bm101":3i0c5bda said:
On my makita it has a wheel on the depth stop that you can tighten. If you loosen it off and push the button it frees the depth stop. Or you wind it down by hand on the thread. Each turn equates to a certain increase in depth for the bit. If you are asking advice on routers I would add that most sensible advice I have read (as another beginner on a router) suggests 3 mm incremental stages of cut depth are adequate. Once you know the machine and it's tolerances then....
Apologies if I'm teaching Grandma to suck eggs. But I doubt that I am.
Grinders I will gladly use drunk. No I shouldn't say it that way, it's just not true. But there's a grain of truth in there. Familiarity might breed contempt but it also breeds competence when you look at it the right way.
My routers I am not scared of but I am cautious. The plug comes out every single time I adjust. 3200 rpms. Yeh. You're all right. I'll take it slowly.

Edit: cross posted with Richard
I positively go out of my way to avoid using the router - evil, violent, noisy monster. It wants to eat me, I just know it!
 

sunnybob

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My router table is the most fun machine I have. I look for reasons to use it. So much so that I never bother to free hand routers unless theres 100's of feet of roundovers to do. But even in a table it WILL bite if its treated carelessly. :shock: :shock:

The few times I did try to freehand a cut the machine instantly went to full depth and lots of interesting things happened very quickly, so I dont do that anymore. :roll:
 

Mykee

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Thanks gentleman for all your advice. You are correct in that this is my first encounter with this type of machine. I will proceed with caution.
Mike O.
 

Mykee

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I have another question about the router. How do I determine the correct speed for each bit. Is it like drill bits, the smaller the bit the faster the speed?
Mike O.
 

Eric The Viking

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Broadly speaking, yes that's correct.

Some bits have the information engraved on the shank (giving a range or a maximum), sometimes it's in the data sheet, sometimes, on the cheap ones, there's nothing.

As a rule run slower rather than faster, as there's less chance of burning the workpiece. Experiment to see what gives you the best cut, before committing to moulding the pieces you need.

E.
 

Sideways

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As a volunteer at a men's shed, I see many people trying to use the routers. Almost without exception and including thse who claim to know what they're doing, they try to cut far too much material at once. It makes the tool hard to control and dangerous as well as heating up the tool and loading the bearings.
As Richard says above, remove the wood in multiple passes, even just a couple of mm at a time while you learn your tool and build your skill.
Far and away the best way to judge is by the sound of the machine: just like a car engine the pitch will drop as the motor slows down fighting it's way through a heavy cut. Keep the speed and pitch of the motor up by taking light cuts.

Let the cutter stop completely before putting your fingers anywhere near it.

You tube is an entertainment channel populated by idiots. Many views and followers doesn't necessarily mean they have a clue. Checkout the thread here about youtube woodworkers and you may get some recommendations.

A router is a fabulously versatile tool. It would be a shame to frighten yourself / get injured / ruin a piece of work through user error.
 

Bod

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Mykee":2exnay4c said:
Thanks gentleman for all your advice. You are correct in that this is my first encounter with this type of machine. I will proceed with caution.
Mike O.
"Mastering the Router" by Ron Fox ISBN 1 86108 194 4
This book is written by an acknowledged expert in this field. Especially for beginners, this book covers the basic's very well. Some of the costing are a little out of date, but the advice is still good.

Bod
 
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