Bosch jigsaw blades codes

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Hi All!

Finally purchased a Bosch jigsaw blade, found a CE 150 used in good condition for a reasonable price. I am a bit lost in terms of the blades. Is there anyway to make sense of the blades codes that bosch uses? I am looking for example at the T308 for finer cuts on hardwoods but there are already different variants such as the 308B, 308BF, 308B0, 308BF.

Some have a tapered end others have a slightly different teeth distance. I have found a PDF but it's rather overwhelming and doesn't have all the codes.

Can someone please help understand how to read these codes?

Thanks!
 
i found a jigsaw guide on Bosch site , for all the jigsaw codes and a description of what used for and type of cut

i cant find on the site like this anymore
But they do cover the blades
Here

what codes are you after - if the PDF does not have your codes , this maynot either

post a list of codes

are these a pack of mixed blades you purchased ???
 

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  • JIGSAW BLADE GUIDE.pdf
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Thanks guys! Fantastic material. So I think I have to get either the 308BF or the 308B. What do they mean with "hardwood"? It seems BF is to cut plastic-coated kitchen counter tops. What if I need to cut instead a 3cm kitchen top which is just hard wood, or hard wood flooring? I find the use of hard wood confusing associated with plastic-coated materials.

And what is "progressor" cuts?
 
And what is "progressor" cuts?

I think (but please research it to make sure I am not misleading you) it refers to a variable tooth spacing on the blade.

A standard hand saw might be 8tpi over its full length. I think the progressor blades have tpi that are not constant over their full length.
 
I sold my Bosch jigsaw so don't have the chart that was inside the lid anymore ...

Here are some thoughts to help you understand how the blades vary. I can't remember the codes.

Firstly, blades vary depending on the material you want to cut.
Softwood, hardwood, plastics, non ferrous metals, steels, fibre board, etc

The thickness of the material affects the number of teeth per inch. Thin materials / fine cuts need high TPI. Cutting thick softwood needs a coarse blade / low TPI or it will clog up and be very slow. Progressor blades I think have a TPI that varies along the length of the blade. If it isn't that, it will be a fancy tooth profile intended for higher performance.

Blades for metal are made out of high speed steel and the shape of the tooth as well as number of TPI are optimised for that. Non ferrous is easier to cut and so have a range of blades that are different from the ones for steel. Blades for aluminium can typically be used to cut plastics.

Bimetal blades are made out of two strips of metal. One gives a durable body, the other a harder longer lasting cutting edge. They are more expensive to make and buy but last longer. BIM I'd expect to see on blades for wood or for non ferrous metal and plastics.

Generally blades are made with a set to the teeth just like any handsaw, but Bosch make a range of ground tooth blades. These are very sharp and don't have any set. They are like japanese saws. These blades have codes that begin with a T . They are very nice clean cutting blades for wood, especially hardwood, and also work on plastic. They were my favorite blade for the saw.

There are some specials like blades with a carbide grit edge for sawing ceramic tiles and very skinny blades for cutting tight curves. The latest innovation for metal blades is to have all the teeth ground into a thin strip of tungsten carbide. A special type of bimetal blade in effect. These last much longer if you are cutting steel.

HTH
 
I sold my Bosch jigsaw so don't have the chart that was inside the lid anymore ...

Here are some thoughts to help you understand how the blades vary. I can't remember the codes.

Firstly, blades vary depending on the material you want to cut.
Softwood, hardwood, plastics, non ferrous metals, steels, fibre board, etc

The thickness of the material affects the number of teeth per inch. Thin materials / fine cuts need high TPI. Cutting thick softwood needs a coarse blade / low TPI or it will clog up and be very slow. Progressor blades I think have a TPI that varies along the length of the blade. If it isn't that, it will be a fancy tooth profile intended for higher performance.

Blades for metal are made out of high speed steel and the shape of the tooth as well as number of TPI are optimised for that. Non ferrous is easier to cut and so have a range of blades that are different from the ones for steel. Blades for aluminium can typically be used to cut plastics.

Bimetal blades are made out of two strips of metal. One gives a durable body, the other a harder longer lasting cutting edge. They are more expensive to make and buy but last longer. BIM I'd expect to see on blades for wood or for non ferrous metal and plastics.

Generally blades are made with a set to the teeth just like any handsaw, but Bosch make a range of ground tooth blades. These are very sharp and don't have any set. They are like japanese saws. These blades have codes that begin with a T . They are very nice clean cutting blades for wood, especially hardwood, and also work on plastic. They were my favorite blade for the saw.

There are some specials like blades with a carbide grit edge for sawing ceramic tiles and very skinny blades for cutting tight curves. The latest innovation for metal blades is to have all the teeth ground into a thin strip of tungsten carbide. A special type of bimetal blade in effect. These last much longer if you are cutting steel.

HTH
Thank you, very useful feedback!
 
Thanks to the info in this discussion I figured out that the store sold me the T308BFP which is for angle cuts. So I need the 308B or the BF. I imagine the choice of speed is also important.
 

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