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Boomerangs

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duncanh

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looking in the archives it appears that I never posted the results of my strip laminated boomearng experiments from a couple of years ago, so here they are along with a couple of lapjoint boomerangs.



A strip laminated boomerang made from ash, makore veneer and iroko inserts.
The 5mm thick strips of ash were steamed in a homemade steam box for about 14 minutes, removed and then clamped around and mdf form. I left them for several days to set into shape before I glued them together with makore veneer and iroko wedges (which I'd also steamed to shape). The glue used was waterproof pva.
This gave a boomerang shape which was about 5cm thick, which I then sawed into 7mm thick slices on the bandsaw. These slices were then profiled using a combination of files, powerfile, cabinet scraper and sandpaper to give the airfoiled boomerang. After a few test throws and profile alterations I applied several coats of tung oil.

This one is 49cm from tip to tip but the others are 51cm as the tops level wasn't glued right to the end. Thickness is approx 6mm.
It has a 30-35m circular flight that climbs steadily and then has a nice hover for an easy catch.




A strip laminated boomerang made from oak and makore veneer.
The 5mm thick strips of oak were steamed in a homemade steam box (made from grey plastic drainpipe and a wallpaper steamer) for about 14 minutes, removed and then clamped around an mdf form. I left them for several days to set into shape before I glued them together with makore veneer.
This gave a boomerang shape which was about 5cm thick, which I then sawed into 7mm thick slices on the bandsaw. These slices were then profiled using a combination of files, powerfile, cabinet scraper and sandpaper to give the airfoiled boomerang. After a few test throws and profile alterations I applied several coats of tung oil.

Thickness is approx 6mm. The top one flies ok and is impressive in the air due to it's size and the very open shape it has whilst flying. It's possible to catch it but it's quite scary!




A lap joint boomerang made from iroko (from and old shool bench) with maple (I think) highlights at the joint.
The boomerang is about 6mm thick and has a wingspan of 39cm. It flies ok and goes about 25m, keeping low and with a fast return.
The lapjoint was made with a combination of hand tools and a dremel used as a router table.




Lap joint boomerang also made from iroko and maple. Doesn't fly brilliantly - probably due to too much drag from the holes left from where the bench top was attached to the base.
 

Adam

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Superb!

I got a boomerang not so long ago, and went down the park, first throw, it sailed off, came back, and I caught it without even moving a single step - much to the interest of several onlookers.

Fortunately, they then wandered off, as for the next hour, I didn't catch it again even once.

:-(

Adam
 

Gill

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I used to have a boomerang too (left-handed, of course :roll: :p ). I became quite good with it and it usually came back to within a step or two of where I was standing. It didn't half build up the muscles in my arm! One of the tricks I learned early on was that it was a good idea to throw the boomerang from halfway up a hill because although you can get the boomerang to come back, it doesn't always come back at a catchable altitude. So if you're standing on a hill and it whizzes back over the top of your head, it'll land on the hillside close to where you're standing. Otherwise you might have to lope off for several hundred yards across fields.

I'll never forget the time I was throwing my boomerang and suddenly a rottweiler hurtled past me down the hill - she thought I was throwing a stick for her to fetch. Her owner and I watched as she raced down the hill, then circled back up the hill only to find that the stick had returned to my hand. There was one puzzled doggy and two humans who were hysterical with laughter on the hill that afternoon. I suppose it's an effective (albeit lazy) way to exercise a dog who's full of energy.

Seeing those boomerangs has made me quite nostalgic. I bet they're fun to make and fun to use. Nicely crafted, Duncan :) .

Gill
 

SimonA

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Wow...cool looking Boomerangs! The only ones I ever had the dog had to bring them back!

And I thought I was the only woodworker in the Newcastle area!! Nice to see you on the forum!

SimonA
 
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