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murphs14

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Hi everybody,
I have a problem with a Sheppach bandsaw. Even with the head wound down to about 2 inches above the table whenever I put a piece of timber through it and I am only talking about soft battening the cut veers toward the fence on the left hand side. It is impossible to get a straight cut. I have adjusted the (not sure what they are called) stops both above and below the table so the blade just runs through without snagging but it is still the same. Help please. Anybody experienced the same.

Thanks
Peter
 

9fingers

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I suggest you buy a new blade from Ian at Tuffsaws.
This will almost certainly sort it out.
If not, step two is to get the 'compleat bandsaw' DVDs from Steve Maskery which will take you through the checking and set up procedure.

Once set up, remember that once a blade has been used for curved cutting, it will rarely cut straight ever again.

Good luck

Bob
 

marcros

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Bob,

I dont have a bandsaw, but have a question- Do you save a blade for curved work then, swapping it over depending on the job, or once it has been used for curved work, does it cut straight enough for most of your purposes for a while and then you change it? It seems an expensive tool if you cant get it to cut straight once it has done some curved cutting.

Mark
 

9fingers

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I tend to keep blades for different jobs. I also work in metal so that needs much finer tooth pitch etc.
Also curved work needs narrower blades and I would not expect or need these to cut straight.
So it boils down to narrow blades for curves and wide blades for straight cutting.
I tend to keep a few for 'best' including new ones and immediately after a best job, take that out and put in a 1/2" metal blade as this will be ok for nearly all quick cuts albeit a bit slower in wood whereas a wood blade will die instantly on steel.

I always get my blades from Ian and never had one break so there are plenty hanging on the nail on the wall to choose from. About 10 I guess. After a while you get to know them as individuals!

Good bandsaws need not be expensive. I think I gave about £150 for my big old 18-s-1 Startrite and spent about £50 on it in modifications/bearing changes etc - details here modifications-to-a-startrite-bandsaw-t38613.html

I don't require it to do finish cutting only preparation of stock. My tablesaw is the precision workshop tool that provides a finish that only needs sanding.

Bob
 

murphs14

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Hi Bob,
Thanks for the advice. I had no idea that if you use a blade for a curved cut it will not run straight again. But I suppose if you think about it it is obvious. Now all I have to do is find out how long my blade is and choose a replacement. I need the saw for furniture making mostly in oak etc. can you reccomend a blade type that would be ideal. I want to avoid as much tear out as I can.
Thanks again,
Pete
 

woodbloke

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Excellent advice from Bob9f as ever. Go and get a Tuffsaws blade(s) and your problems are probably 99% sorted - Rob
 

9fingers

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murphs14":1nho6erh said:
Hi Bob,
Thanks for the advice. I had no idea that if you use a blade for a curved cut it will not run straight again. But I suppose if you think about it it is obvious. Now all I have to do is find out how long my blade is and choose a replacement. I need the saw for furniture making mostly in oak etc. can you reccomend a blade type that would be ideal. I want to avoid as much tear out as I can.
Thanks again,
Pete
Pete, If you send an email to Ian describing your saw model and your main application(s) he will be able to suggest the best blade for you. His service and quality of advice is second to none and his blades are not expensive.
http://www.tuffsaws.co.uk/

If a blade does not cut straight, it is often that the set of the teeth is different from one side to the other. When cutting curves, one side of the blade works harder than the other and can lose its set more on that side as well as becoming blunter.

hth

Bob
 

CHJ

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9fingers":1f7br7fa said:
If a blade does not cut straight, it is often that the set of the teeth is different from one side to the other. When cutting curves, one side of the blade works harder than the other and can lose its set more on that side as well as becoming blunter.
...
When doing a batch of blank sorting/preparation I tend to alternate right and left curves which goes some way to reducing the wear imbalance, this is also less of a factor with blades with increased set as blade is subjected to less side pressure if you are less than perfect in curve tracking. I believe Ian may well have some blades now optimised for round blank cutting in green wood. Bigger kerf of no matter for this application and less risk of binding.
 

Steve Maskery

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The Scheppach saws are perfectly decent machines, I have one myself, so there is every reason to expect that you can get the results you seek.
Ian will certainly give you excellent advice and investing in a few of his blades will definitely set you on the right track(ing) :)

As regards straight v curved cutting and blade widths:
Personally, I think that a narrow blade, which is essential if you are cutting tight curves, will, unless it is VERY worn, or kinked, can still be set up to cut straight, it will just be a bit more difficult than with a wide blade that has never seen twisting stresses, which is what happens when cutting curves. If you try to cut tight curves with a wide blade, then yes, you are damaging it for ever.

Part of the skill of using a bandsaw is knowing your blades and learning to pick the right one and installing it accurately and QUICKLY. If it takes you half an hour then it is tempting to leave the wrong one on and then you get into trouble. If you learn to swap them in 5 or 10 minutes, then you are much more likely to do so and benefit from the improved cut as a result.

Regards
Steve
 

kirkpoore1

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As everyone has said, your primary problem is your blade. I think the set (side to side tooth displacement) is gone on one side, so toss it and get a new blade. When you do install it, make sure the guides are behind the teeth. I've never seen the tooth set worn off by cutting wood. I have seen it worn off by either having the blade so far back that the teeth hit the guides, or by hitting something like a nail with the blade.

I use a 1/4" wide blade for almost all my cutting on both my 30" and 14" saws. As Steve indicated, when properly set up a narrow blade will cut straight, until it starts getting dull or takes damage.

Kirk
 

Blister

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Ian does 2 types of blades

Standard ( Very good )

and M42 grade ( Very Very Very Good ) lasts up to 10 times longer before needing replacing
 

woodbloke

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Blister":3mmqju4o said:
and M42 grade ( Very Very Very Good ) lasts up to 10 times longer before needing replacing
...but bear in mind that you need a slightly smaller blade than the max recommended for your machine and it's also wise (recommended by Alan Holtham) to slacken off the tension with this sort of blade. Other than that, they're brilliant - Rob
 

Steve Maskery

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Peter, you may glean some useful info about tracking (which is what we are talking about here, the quality and state of your existing blade notwithstanding) in this thread here:.

Regards
Steve
 

murphs14

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Thanks everybody.
I have contacted Tuffsaws. Heres hoping a new blade sorts the probs. thanks again
peter
 

Steve Maskery

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Hmm.
Much of what he says on that page is good, but not all of it. Drift can happen when cutting circles as well as when using a rip fence, the result being a spiral cut.

Skewing the fence to compensate for drift is common practice, but it is not best practice. It is much better, if you can, to adjust the tracking to eliminate drift, rather than just compensate for it. This is possible on all but the most imbalanced blades, so if the set is that badly damaged, it's probably time for a new blade anyway.

Start from the ground up. Blade from Tuffsaws. Wheel alignment, tracking, tension, tracking, guides and thrust bearings. And tracking.

And all shall be well.

And with drift eliminated, you will be able to use the mitre fence on the mitre track properly, too

S
 

Martingchapman

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Steve,
As a hobbyist woodworker, having read a Specialist Band saw book (forget the author now) and various comments/web articles I accepted that drift was the cause of a similar problem I had with my band saw (after changing the blade, checking the settings as suggested etc) so I have skewed the rip fence (only by a minute amount), and this seems to have solved my problem.

However, I am only a hobbyist, part time woodworker and don't have your experience so I am happy to bow to your superior knowledge (genuine comment, please don't take this the wrong way, I am not being sarcastic).

I must admit, I was uncomfortable about skewing the rip fence and it maybe that I have not got my band saw set up quite right, so will take another look.

Thanks for the response - Martin.
 

Steve Maskery

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Hi Martin
No sarcasm inferred, I assure you.
It's not that skewing the rip fence to compensate does not work, it does, but it has its limitations, especially when it comes to crosscutting. It's just that there is an even better fix, that's all.
Steve
 
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