Boxwood woes

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
Your box looks like elm to me. As for a branch 8” in diameter and 3’ long…lucky you that must have cost a fortune, if not another reason it might not be box.

Rabbit glue… there’s a reason people don’t use it anymore
 
As the other said, definitely not box. I have quite a few bits with the bark on and nothing like that, I use box for carving small items because it's close grain and even creamy colour, I've never seen any with grain like that.
 
Sorry but this is boxwood, grain and bark is a bit different from the timber you have
 

Attachments

  • 5F2CBA68-3F17-4A60-AC40-838254344037.jpeg
    5F2CBA68-3F17-4A60-AC40-838254344037.jpeg
    56.9 KB · Views: 0
Your box looks like elm to me. As for a branch 8” in diameter and 3’ long…lucky you that must have cost a fortune, if not another reason it might not be box.

Rabbit glue… there’s a reason people don’t use it anymore
I would also say Elm,
both colour and grain look right
 
Last edited:
I know everyone is desperate to tell me my boxwood isn’t boxwood. And you may all be right. But:

It is unbelievably hard. it makes a very fine white sawdust when cut. I’ve never come across anything else with that texture except boxwood. This is difficult to tell from pics.

Those samples in the pics were taken from a piece that was a fork in the tree, which had split and cracked. Usually with wood we work with long bits, with regular grain. The unusable bits are discarded. This was an unusable piece that would have been discarded. it was contaminated and probably spalted.

Most boxwood people use for turning or carving comes from nice, short, regular logs from branches. Look at an oak trunk bark vs an oak branch - completely different.

I will get the log down later and see if I can find a horticultural expert to identify the species. In fact there is a tree surgeon down the road, I can ask him.

Whatever it is, I may as well cut it up. Any thoughts on my bandsaw question?
 
Have you considered a second hand one?
Pretty much everything I have is second hand or vintage. Quite happy with something that needs fixing or renovating.

Spec: small, cheap bench top bandsaw that can mill large logs or resaw thick stock :)
 
Spec: small, cheap bench top bandsaw that can mill large logs or resaw thick stock :)
I’m guessing a maximum of three out of the five requirements are achievable at the same time. I.e. small and cheap and bench top but not large logs or thick stock. Or possibly if going second hand with a fixer upper then cheap and large logs and thick stock but not small and bench top.
 
Last edited:
Pretty much everything I have is second hand or vintage. Quite happy with something that needs fixing or renovating.

Spec: small, cheap bench top bandsaw that can mill large logs or resaw thick stock :)
You may struggle to find a bench top machine that will handle "large" logs.
 
I’m guessing a maximum of three out of the five requirements are achievable at the same time. I.e. small and cheap and bench top but not large logs or thick stock. Or possibly if going second with a hand fixer upper then cheap and large logs and thick stock but not small and bench top.
Beat me to it!
 
Pretty much everything I have is second hand or vintage. Quite happy with something that needs fixing or renovating.

Spec: small, cheap bench top bandsaw that can mill large logs or resaw thick stock :)
I'd look for the biggest you can make space for, within your price range. When it comes to bandsaws bigger is better
 
It never ceases to surprise me the number of people that ask for advice but only if it matches what they’ve already decided
 

Latest posts

Back
Top