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Axminster 1628 v/s woodlathe

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renderer01

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Hello Graham,

Main dealer says both brands of machine come from same factory in Taiwan.

Rend
 

Robbo3

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Having upgraded to the AT1628VS I have two minor gripes.

There is a cooling fan for the electrics, permanently on whilst the machine is powered up (probably the noisiest part of the lathe), meaning that it has to be unplugged/switched off if you leave it for any length of time, & secondly, the display panel attracts dust like a there's no tomorrow. Although there is a thin polythene covering, it soon gets tatty & the dust gets underneath. I may try a screen protector, the type that is used on mobile phones & tablets.

As to the weight (96kg), I had to get two strong friends to carry in the lathe bed with the headstock centralised & the tailstock removed - & I used to be able to carry 50kg bags of cement. It was then rested on a workmate with a couple of offcuts of wood to adjust the height so that the legs could be fitted. They need to be lined up fairly acccurately for the bolts to engage the threads tapped into the underside of the bed. The lathe then had to be inched into position, one end at a time. I would estimate the legs to weigh 40kg each, or perhaps a bit more. Considering that it's only 710mm between centres/1150mm overall, that's some weight compared to lathes with a longer bed (Jet 1642 = 1760mm/200kg).

The legs make the centre height 1160mm (45 1/2") approx, which I like but others may not.

The headstock on the AT1628VS both swivels & moves along the bed where as the Jet 1642 doesn't look as if it swivels (but I'm willing to be corrected on that).

The AT1628VS is my third lathe, The first was the small 12" Record RPMSL which is still going well in the hands of a friend. The second was the Draper WTL90 which has served me well for a number of years & is currently for sale only because it couldn't cope with the large size of the timber I am now being offered.


IMHO, what this lathe offers is probably the best value for money at the bottom end of the heavyweight lathe market. 400mm capacity is a hefty chunk of wood - & the size can be increased to 870mm with the addition of a bed extension.

It will take a better turner than me to stretch this lathe's capabilities.
 

renderer01

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Hello Robbo,

There is some very usefull data here and thanks for that, I will seriously consider covering the display with some other transparent material. The deal is the machine comes to Scotland to me when they have enough machines to make the trip here worthwhile. The fan for the electrics well I think I can live with that all machinery is isolated when I leave the workshop.

Thanks.
Rend.
 

renderer01

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Hello Robbo3,
My lathe arrives on Tuesday and I have a quick ish question to ask you.

Is there anything with the benefit of hindsite you would advise regards setting up of lathe.
Are you still as content with the lathe.
I have 2 rather burly young uns coming to help me and I have done all the work and can think of needs done prior to arrival.
Thanks for any information you can give me.

Rend.
 

Richard@Axminster

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Grahamshed":1xmywwf7 said:
duncanh":1xmywwf7 said:
The Axminster might look similar to the Killinger lathes but if you compare the models you will see that most of the specs are different - power, capacity, weight, spindle speed, mass.
As for being made in Germany, the Axminster manual contains the following :-
'Manufactured by Kingcraft Machinery Company
Limited/NO.26, Gong Yeh 12 Rd., Da-Li City, Taichung
County, Taiwan'

One advantage for me would be that the Axminster headstock can be moved along the bed and rotated, allowing it to fit better in my small sized shed.
This lathe has been discussed before and the member here who works for Axi confirmed it was from Killinger. The bit about being made in Taiwan is disappointing though.
Hi all,

Axminster source the lathe from Kingcraft in Taiwan. Kingcraft also manufacture lathes for Killenger. The quality of them is fantastic!
 

Grahamshed

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Ahhh. Ok. The answer last time was that it came from the same factory as the Killinger. I guess the rest was just my ( incorrect ) assumption.
 

Robbo3

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renderer01":1dmvfwn1 said:
Hello Robbo3, My lathe arrives on Tuesday and I have a quick ish question to ask you.
Is there anything with the benefit of hindsite you would advise regards setting up of lathe.
Are you still as content with the lathe.
I have 2 rather burly young uns coming to help me and I have done all the work and can think of needs done prior to arrival.
Thanks for any information you can give me.
Rend.
I stand by everything I said in my previous post. Not found anything that I don't like apart from the two minor gripes that I mentioned ... but then, I'm a hobby turner.

Even so, I can't see anything that a production turner could find fault with. If they turn large artistic pieces they would probably have chosen a heavier lathe.

Just my opinion. I'm sure you'll enjoy your new lathe when it arrives. :)
 

renderer01

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Hello and Thanks Robbo,

Thats great glad of the data and glad your enjoying your lathe. I tend not to turn much in the way of large pieces and 16 inch diameter is not a common size for me to turn. However it gives me a very easy capability to turn beyond 12inch with much more stability. I do feel that budget and space available play a huge part in the choice of lathe purchased and SWMBO kindly agreed to extend the budget considerably to buy this machine,for which and for some time I will be required to demonstrate much gratitude. :ho2

Cheers.
Rend.
 

Robbo3

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renderer01":2p094rx5 said:
I tend not to turn much in the way of large pieces and 16 inch diameter is not a common size for me to turn. However it gives me a very easy capability to turn beyond 12inch with much more stability. I do feel that budget and space available play a huge part in the choice of lathe purchased .... rest snipped
Rend.
I meant to have said the same thing but forgot :oops: , however you probably put it more eloquently. :)
 

woodfarmer

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Well I visited Axminster and had a look and a play. There isn't much between the 1642 and the 1628Vs but on balance the Axminster 1628 vs seemed the better choice for what I think I will be doing. I doubt I will ever run out of lathe with it.
The 3520b is almost an order of magnitude better, at least in looks and weight. It is really well manufactured and finished having an aura of competence about it. It almost challenges you to throw something at it that it can't handle. I guess to put it in car terms the 1628vs is a diesel Mondeo estate and the 3520b is a Bentley.

I am now back in France and waiting for the rain to stop so I can put the parts in a tractor and take it to the shed in the back field which will be its home. It will be assembled there. At the moment is is raining hard and I don't want to risk getting water on the ground bedways etc. One thing I forgot to buy was the wax to cover the lathe parts to stop any dampness getting to it. Anyone have any ideas what I can use as a temporary substitute?
 

renderer01

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Hello Woodfarmer,
Congrats on your new lathe mine arrives on tuesday coming and im like cat on hot tin roof. Absolute murder, hey ho.
The waxing of the bedways is achievable with any hard paste wax, I use wax 22 around once a week im aware its not the best but it does a decent enough job on the bandsaw table which is cast. I may change my mind when new lathe arrives but you did say what could you use until you get the real mccoy I think.

Hope this helps.
Rend.
 

woodfarmer

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Thanks for that Renderer01. Since posting I have done a bit of browsing and have come across boeings t9. It seems to be the ideal product. Has anyone any experience with this?

Rain expected to stop by midday tomorrow.
 

nicguthrie

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Boeing's T9 stuff is good, I've used it.

When it's to be used on areas that need little friction tho, like bandsaw tables and guide beds etc, it's best to spray it all over, rub it in with a clean cloth. Wait till the next day and it'll be as "soaked in" as it'll get and be sticky to touch, to fix that buff it hard with another clean rag and the tackiness vanishes. If you want a perfect, non-fingerprintable finish that will last a lot longer, add and buff a layer of microcrystalline wax over the top after.

It's not my method, I got it from "The Wood Whisperer" on YouTube on his video about setting up a bandsaw and preventing rust. I've done it to my stuff and it works an absolute treat.

Nic.
 
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