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Arched front Door

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Waka

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My nephew has asked me to make a new front door for him, he lives in a cemetary lodge so the door apertures all contain arches.

I have thought of making the door from AWO, does the panel think this would be an ideal choice of wood?
 

Jacob

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Horrible stuff! What's wrong with redwood? That's most likely what all his other doors are made of.
 

Harbo

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I googled this info on uses for AWO:

"Construction, furniture, flooring, architectural joinery, exterior joinery, mouldings, doors, kitchen cabinets, panelling, railway sleepers, timber bridges, barrel staves, coffins and caskets. White oak can vary in colour, texture, characteristics and properties according to the growing region. It is therefore recommended that users and specifiers work closely with their suppliers to make sure the wood they order is suited to their specific needs. Northern and Southern may be sold separately."

Rod
 

Mr T

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Hi

AWO tends to be kilned ferociously, which is not good on external joinery. Euro oak may be better, and nicer to work.

Chris
 

9fingers

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Need also to consider the finish. Paint is a devil to persuade to stick to oak so oils are preferred.
Stainless steel or other non ferrous hardware needs to be used to remove the risk of staining.
Air dried timber should behave better than kilned.

Are you making the frame as well? if not, I'd suggest fettling a full size template (rod) to fit on site and also check if the frame has any twisting in it that you will have to try and match.
Consider what draught stripping system you will use and how that will retrofit to the frame.
Overall, it is a lot easier to make a new frame and fit that to the opening.

Good luck



Bob
 

Waka

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Thanks for the comments, luckily we're still in the talking stage. I wanted to know what wood is preferable because I've got to put in a wood order in the new year.
 

soulboy

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Waka, where do get your timber from, is it local?
chris
 

Steve Maskery

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9fingers":3g0zqc6m said:
Overall, it is a lot easier to make a new frame and fit that to the opening.
+1, unless.....

I made a new front door for my previous home - door and frame. What I didn't realise until I started to remove the original frame was that it was L-shaped in section. The outer skin of brickwork and the inner skin (trad 9" solid wall, no cavity) did not line up and were out of alignment by an inch or two, I forget exactly. It meant that the frame had to be built up (because I had made it rectangular in section) to fit.

I have no idea why the house was built like this. Perhaps someone who does this more often than I do could enlighten me, please?
S
 

Waka

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I agree regarding making frame and door together. I'll have to recommend a new frame with the door, at least that way I can put it all together in the workshop before going to fit.

Chris I get my timber from Timbnet, I used to use Atkin & Cripps before Timbnet took the over. I've always had good quality wood from them and from order to delivery it is sometimes only a day or two.
To get around the delivery charge you have to have in excess of £400 worth, that's not a problem because I always like to keep a good stock in the workshop.
 

Jacob

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9fingers":38a8carw said:
......

Are you making the frame as well? if not, I'd suggest fettling a full size template (rod) to fit on site and also check if the frame has any twisting in it that you will have to try and match.
A rod isn't a template. You would only need the principle dimensions - allowing for anything being out of square so you can trim the door to fit the opening if necessary
.....
Overall, it is a lot easier to make a new frame and fit that to the opening.
...
Nah! Of course it isn't! Unless it's a really weird misshapen frame perhaps. Making a new door to fit an existing frame in fair to moderate condition is a doddle compared to fitting a frame as well.
 

Jacob

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Steve Maskery":1giic62d said:
..... The outer skin of brickwork and the inner skin (trad 9" solid wall, no cavity) did not line up and were out of alignment by an inch or two, I forget exactly. It meant that the frame had to be built up (because I had made it rectangular in section) to fit.

I have no idea why the house was built like this. ....
Pretty normal to set doors/windows in a bit of a masonry rebate pre say 1920. Especially sashes. Usually one brick reveal at the outside or about 6" if stone.
Makes a neater job.
 

Steve Maskery

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Hmm. Thanks Jacob, but I don't really understand that. The house was 1937. I don't see how having to make a rebated frame is easier than a, what shall I call it, a flat one.
S
 

Jacob

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Steve Maskery":bkvzhgnn said:
Hmm. Thanks Jacob, but I don't really understand that. The house was 1937. I don't see how having to make a rebated frame is easier than a, what shall I call it, a flat one.
S
The rebate is in the masonry, not the frame. This means the frame is set behind the outer brickwork and flush to the back of the bricks which gives much more leeway in fitting, and a neater joint. Nearly all sashes are done this way with a 3 to 4" rebate in the masonry, covering the sash box and showing just a neat 1" of timber on the outside.
Doors may be the same with just 1" of timber showing but there are lots of variations.

Here's a door with the frame set back behind a masonry rebate. Just 18mm showing, not unlike a sash window front lining, and in fact can be made that way e.g. with redwood slender frame to same thickness as door with oak front lining planted on.

 

MickCheese

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Waka":210a93cn said:
I agree regarding making frame and door together. I'll have to recommend a new frame with the door, at least that way I can put it all together in the workshop before going to fit.

Chris I get my timber from Timbnet, I used to use Atkin & Cripps before Timbnet took the over. I've always had good quality wood from them and from order to delivery it is sometimes only a day or two.
To get around the delivery charge you have to have in excess of £400 worth, that's not a problem because I always like to keep a good stock in the workshop.
Waka

Should that be TimbMet? Google only brings up this.

I see there is a branch of TimbMet in Borhamwood so not too far for me.

Mick
 

Waka

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MickCheese":38f88cn6 said:
Waka":38f88cn6 said:
I agree regarding making frame and door together. I'll have to recommend a new frame with the door, at least that way I can put it all together in the workshop before going to fit.

Chris I get my timber from Timbnet, I used to use Atkin & Cripps before Timbnet took the over. I've always had good quality wood from them and from order to delivery it is sometimes only a day or two.
To get around the delivery charge you have to have in excess of £400 worth, that's not a problem because I always like to keep a good stock in the workshop.
Waka

Should that be TimbMet? Google only brings up this.

I see there is a branch of TimbMet in Borhamwood so not too far for me.

Mick
That's the one Mike, spelling mistake on my part.
 

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