• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

anybody own or read this book?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,775
Reaction score
572
Location
Pembrokeshire
I don't own that book, I have heard of it though and it's original booklets. This thread has just reminded me of its existence so I've just bought it through Classic Hand tools :lol: I'll report back whether it's any good or not! From what I gather, Richard Arnold (I believe he's also a user here) managed to find all the original booklets from the early 1900s and sent them over to Chris Schwarz in the US who made them all into a little book. It should be a nice little look into how it used to be done ye olden days. While I'm at it may as well pick up Richard Jones' "Cut and Dried" too :)

If you want some of my suggestions for good reference material for making architectural joinery, here are a few good ones:

Modern Practical Joinery by George Ellis; This 450-page book is from around the same era as the "Door making and Window making" book in the early 1900s, 1902 to be exact. The man was very clearly a very intelligent man and knew what he was talking about. The book goes into excruciating detail about pretty much every process, it goes over the tools, machines, timbers, design etc etc... It's not just a book telling you how to do it, it's telling you why you do this part this particular way and why you do that part like that. Excellent illustrations and plates, all in all, I would rate it as almost essential reading for anyone who does conservation work replacing old windows and doors. He also did an excellent book called "Modern Practical Stairbuilding and Handrailing" if that's of interest.

Purpose-made Joinery by E.V. Foad; A bit more modern book from the 1980s, it's a very good 300 or so page book. Filled with illustrations with some cracking cross sections, very similar to Ellis' book but 80 years newer so there have been some technological advances since :wink:

Carpentry & Joinery 1,2, & 3 by R Bayliss; These were more focused towards students doing their City and Guilds certificates in the 1960s and '70s, there's some very good information in them on doors and windows and it's aimed at beginners so it's all fairly simple stuff.

Carpentry and Joinery 1,2,3 & 4 by Porter; Pretty much the same as Bayliss' books but there is also good information to be had in these.

I've yet to find a proper "modern" door making and window making book that goes into 21st-century methods and construction, a lot has changed in 110 years since Ellis wrote his book. We now have draught seals, friction hinges, 3 point locking systems, espagnolette locking systems, different paints, double glazing, triple glazing, silicones, tapes, squirty foam, Accoya and all manner of things that are radically different to the 1900s way of making things.

If you ever have any questions, don't hesitate :D
 

Steve Maskery

Established Member
Joined
26 Apr 2004
Messages
11,799
Reaction score
143
Location
Kirkby-in-Ashfield
Trevanion":3sv3gm7w said:
I've yet to find a proper "modern" door making and window making book that goes into 21st-century methods and construction, a lot has changed in 110 years since Ellis wrote his book. We now have draught seals, friction hinges, 3 point locking systems, espagnolette locking systems, different paints, double glazing, triple glazing, silicones, tapes, squirty foam, Accoya and all manner of things that are radically different to the 1900s way of making things.
Not doors, but windows. Hyslop. Published by TRADA, I think. Not cheap but excellent. It used to be a free download! (Edit - Hislop with an i).
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,030
Reaction score
495
Location
Bristol
I've got the Lost Art Press book. I've also got the same contents in 1970s reprints. I've not got the original 1900s editions but have seen them.
The 1900s originals were close to A4 size. The 1970s and the LAP are photographic reproductions, on a smaller page size. Occasionally this makes some of the diagrams a little hard to interpret, but they've done a good job of making them as clear as they can.

They cover pretty much all you need to know about making the ordinary ranges of domestic windows and doors, by hand. That includes subtleties of sizing and marking out which I've not seen covered so well anywhere else.

The writer assumes a fair degree of general knowledge of joinery in the reader, so doesn't spend pages on unnecessary things like how to saw, plane or cut joints. The prose can be fairly terse for the modern reader but all the information is there.

The LAP edition is nicely printed and bound - I recommend it.

Just to add to Trevanion's excellent post, I suggest looking at Cassell's Carpentry and Joinery, edited by Hasluck. It has more details on some aspects than Ellis. Available as html or PDF here.

https://archive.org/stream/cassellscarp ... 0/mode/2up
 

HOJ

Established Member
Joined
21 Oct 2014
Messages
350
Reaction score
9
Location
South Norfolk
Depends on what you are intending, I have a 1980 copy, which is when I bought it! which also includes a section on staircases, not really relevant though if you want to make anything with double glazed units, the Trada window book is more about design and standards, with very limited detail on manufacturing techniques.

As Trevanion has outlined, lots of other books that may be more appropriate.
 

Mutley Racers

Established Member
Joined
15 Jun 2017
Messages
159
Reaction score
2
Location
Molesey
AndyT":3vr7siu8 said:
I've got the Lost Art Press book. I've also got the same contents in 1970s reprints. I've not got the original 1900s editions but have seen them.
The 1900s originals were close to A4 size. The 1970s and the LAP are photographic reproductions, on a smaller page size. Occasionally this makes some of the diagrams a little hard to interpret, but they've done a good job of making them as clear as they can.

They cover pretty much all you need to know about making the ordinary ranges of domestic windows and doors, by hand. That includes subtleties of sizing and marking out which I've not seen covered so well anywhere else.

The writer assumes a fair degree of general knowledge of joinery in the reader, so doesn't spend pages on unnecessary things like how to saw, plane or cut joints. The prose can be fairly terse for the modern reader but all the information is there.

The LAP edition is nicely printed and bound - I recommend it.

Just to add to Trevanion's excellent post, I suggest looking at Cassell's Carpentry and Joinery, edited by Hasluck. It has more details on some aspects than Ellis. Available as html or PDF here.

https://archive.org/stream/cassellscarp ... 0/mode/2up
Wow, thanks for the link. Are you able to download this by any chance. When opening on my phone it is very small to read
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,030
Reaction score
495
Location
Bristol
Yes, it's downloadable as a PDF or computer scanned text in a choice of formats. Exact details depend on whether you are looking at the mobile or desktop site, it might be a menu option on the page or just scroll down for options.
Failing that, go to archive.org and search texts for Cassell carpentry.
 

Mutley Racers

Established Member
Joined
15 Jun 2017
Messages
159
Reaction score
2
Location
Molesey
When buying books these days guys do you buy the book or just download it?

I know it is nice to have a book in the hand but as space is a premium these days???

Cheers
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,030
Reaction score
495
Location
Bristol
Mutley Racers":1xjkdjyr said:
When buying books these days guys do you buy the book or just download it?

I know it is nice to have a book in the hand but as space is a premium these days???

Cheers
Haven't you seen my pictures of my overflowing bookshelves? :lol:

Downloads really score though when it comes to the thousands of free, old, out of copyright books on any subject you please, available for immediate access on the screen of your choice.
 

thetyreman

Established Member
Joined
4 Mar 2016
Messages
3,130
Reaction score
318
Location
North West
Mutley Racers":7ie82on2 said:
When buying books these days guys do you buy the book or just download it?

I know it is nice to have a book in the hand but as space is a premium these days???

Cheers
I will always prefer a physical copy than staring at a screen, the info doesn't go in the same for me no matter how hard I try, plus I got a big bookcase to fill that I made with handtools :D
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,030
Reaction score
495
Location
Bristol
Thanks for checking. There are so many variables when downloading pdfs it's hard to find a link sometimes.
If you can, use the desktop and a good browser. The mobile version of the site hides some of the options.

Also, using Open Library is often the clearest way to find the various editions of old books and check which ones are available as scans.

https://openlibrary.org/
 

Mutley Racers

Established Member
Joined
15 Jun 2017
Messages
159
Reaction score
2
Location
Molesey

Mutley Racers

Established Member
Joined
15 Jun 2017
Messages
159
Reaction score
2
Location
Molesey
AndyT":2m62zbwt said:
Thanks for checking. There are so many variables when downloading pdfs it's hard to find a link sometimes.
If you can, use the desktop and a good browser. The mobile version of the site hides some of the options.

Also, using Open Library is often the clearest way to find the various editions of old books and check which ones are available as scans.

https://openlibrary.org/
Thank you for your time and patience. I will keep persisting!
 
Top