Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Air Filters - advice needed

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

LyNx

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2005
Messages
1,159
Reaction score
0
Location
swindon
After routering a few panels, sanding edges and sanding a few fibreglass moulds i noticed alot of air born dust. I don't have any extraction at the moment but plan on a small performance Power shop vac http://www.diy.com/diy/jsp/bq/produ...142&entryFlag=false&PRODID=192047&paintCatId=

What i was looking at to remove the airborne dust is the Perform CCAF Air Filter from Axminster (http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pf_id=33223&recno=1)

What are peoples views on these products. Remember, the budget is tight and it's my first setup so i don't need things to last forever at this stage.
 

Newbie_Neil

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2003
Messages
6,537
Reaction score
0
Location
Nottingham, England
Hi LyNx

When routing, a lot of people on here use the Trend T30AF.

Have a look at this thread: -
https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/view ... sc&start=0

The most important area to start dust collection is at the source and if you are routing mdf etc. then I would recommend that you wear a mask as well.

The Trend one is about thirty pounds and includes a visor.

Cheers
Neil
 

LyNx

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2005
Messages
1,159
Reaction score
0
Location
swindon
Neil, thanks for the reply

Don't get me wrong. It's my first set-up at home, but I've been in the trade for 17 years from the age of 16, site carpenter, joiner, cabinet maker. Safety first is my motto. I already have good masks that i use but will be upgrading to the Trend Airace very soon (again, budget)

Do you think the PP workshop VAC is enough for basic "source" dust collection in additional to the Perform CCAF Air Filter at a later date.
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
3
Location
SE London - NW Kent
LyNx,

Cheap vacuums and Dust collectors will often pass a lot of really fine dust through their filters and it is the very fine stuff that can be damaging to lungs. The very expensive Festool kit meets strict standards for this - most manufacturers just ignore these standards where home workshop machines are involved. So if you are not prepared for an expensive machine do budget for a good mask.
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
I have the older, I assume, version of the B&Q vac, and it seems to be very good; I have no complaints anyway. Lots of suck and I'm not conscious of clouds of fine dust escaping. But then I don't move in Festool circles. :D You could do a lot worse I reckon.

Cheers, Alf
 

cambournepete

Established Member
Joined
29 Mar 2004
Messages
2,710
Reaction score
0
Location
Rangiora, South Island, Aotearoa
I have a cheapy vac (from lidl) that does suck (when the tube isn't blocked) but lets lots of fine dust out. You can't really see it in normal operation, but there is a small cloudlet on start-up and if the output is against something dust collects on that something. It's better than nothing as it collects bigger bits, but not great.

It's destined for to rejoin the Triton when the CT22 getss into the garage...

I use one of the Axminster air filters, from which I've removed the NVR switch so it's comes on when I switch on the gargae at the master switch - that way there's no excuse for not using it.
 

Barry Burgess

Established Member
Joined
25 May 2005
Messages
830
Reaction score
0
Location
Camberley
I bought a cheap W2000 vacuum from e bay and made a mini cyclone using a plastic bucket attached to a 60litre drum in which I put a black bag to catch the dust. ( The design was from the Australian woodworking site) It uses a funnel at the bottom of the plastic bucket, a 90 degree 38mm waste pipe as the inlet and a straight piece of 38mm for the vacuum to attach to.
Almost zero of the dust gets to the vacuum as the cyclone created gets most of the fine dust to be collected.
 

LyNx

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2005
Messages
1,159
Reaction score
0
Location
swindon
Got any pictures or the plan to hand?

LyNx
 

DaveL

Established Member
Joined
19 Oct 2002
Messages
4,674
Reaction score
0
Location
Sudbury, Suffolk
LyNx,

If you can find a suitable fan you can make an air filter quite easily, take a look at whatI did, it works really well and cost a fraction of buying one. :D
Nice of Axminster to sell the spare filters so cheaply. 8)
 

Woodythepecker

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2004
Messages
686
Reaction score
0
LyNx, Chris is right about the vac's

As for the Perform Air Filter you mentioned, i do not know about that particular model, but i do have the AFS2000, or the Big Brother as Axminster call it, and safety wise it is one of the best things i have bought for the workshop. Where there used to be a lot of fine dust laying about the shop when i entered it every morning there is now virtually none. The air is a great deal cleaner, and my nose is now never blocked. If you are in any doubt as to whether the filter is working or not just wait until you open it up to clean it, it is unbelievable at how much dust there is flying around in the air.

There is a optional washable outer filter for my model and if you can get one for the Perform then i would recommend it, because in the long run it will save you money. As for the inner filter it appears that under normal conditions you do not have to change it, just hoover it every now and again.

How big is your workshop, because this will dictate what model you need to buy.

Its ok connecting and using dust extractors, but the real danger is the fine dust floating around unseen.

Hope this helps.

Regards

Woody
 

tim

Established Member
Joined
5 Nov 2004
Messages
2,307
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire
I have the smaller version of Woody's 2000 which is fine for my workshop (c 85m3). He is right about the lack of fine dust lying around in the morning. Definitely worth investing in one if you can.

Cheers

Tim
 

LyNx

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2005
Messages
1,159
Reaction score
0
Location
swindon
thanks for the replies people.

As i like to "have a go" then i may go down Daves route and build my own. The workshop (single garage) is only 4x2.6 metres by 2.5 metres high. Not the biggest but it still needs to be dust free

LyNx
 

Barry Burgess

Established Member
Joined
25 May 2005
Messages
830
Reaction score
0
Location
Camberley
LyNx":3nrko5u9 said:
thanks for the replies people.

As i like to "have a go" then i may go down Daves route and build my own. The workshop (single garage) is only 4x2.6 metres by 2.5 metres high. Not the biggest but it still needs to be dust free

LyNx
I built 2 cyclone vacuum based units and an at present converting a single 1.5 length garage to a 4" soil pipe ducted system. It takes time as most of my equipment does not have 4" outlets so i have to modify each to suit. It requires a heat gum and PVC pipe ( I new skill to me - but I am getting better).
I used 110mm soil pipe around the garage and blastgates at each outlet(102mm) so some packing is required. It should be completed soom
 

LyNx

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2005
Messages
1,159
Reaction score
0
Location
swindon
After reading alot of post on homemade units i'm going to have a go myself. One question, can i make the cyclone unit out of fibreglass. I have been told that it'll create too much static but as the inside face will be off the mould then it'll be very smooth.

Any help would be great

Andy
 

DaveL

Established Member
Joined
19 Oct 2002
Messages
4,674
Reaction score
0
Location
Sudbury, Suffolk
Hi Andy,

I have seen pictures on the net of clear cyclones that you can see the dust swirl round in. :shock: I would think that just fitting an earth strip into the thing should stop the build up of static. :)
 
Top