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Advice required: pine & painted image ...

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LeeElms

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What I want to do, as simply as possible:

Requirement: to be able to paint an image (using black acrylic paint) onto pine and then apply some durable protective finish (some kind of polyurethane, I guess).

Advice please ! ...

Should I seal the wood in some way before the painting ? If so, with what ?
Do I need to apply something over the painted image before applying the protective finish ?
 

Gill

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Hi Lee

This is the way I do it - others may have different methods.

Firstly, I would apply a coat of sanding sealer, the sort that dries clear. When you apply it, it should have a milky consistency but don't worry about that - it'll dry clear. Once it's dried, give it a very light sanding because the grain will have been slightly raised and it'll feel rough. Sanding sealer is quite cheap and it helps to fill the grain so that the wood loses its absorbency. As a result, you'll use less paint and there'll be less risk of a blotchy or smeared finish.

After sanding, paint the image and let it dry. Acrylic paints are a 6ugger for running when you apply varnish over the top with a brush. If you must apply varnish with a brush, use one stroke over the paint and let it dry. Again, sand the piece very lightly and apply a second coat of varnish. Of course, you can apply the second coat as per normal and not worry so much about the paint running because the first coat will have sealed it.

I don't use brushes when applying varnish over acrylic, prefering to use a clear aerosol lacquer such as those available from Halfords and other motor car factors. Again, take care with the first coat and make sure it's applied lightly. I then leave the first coat to dry completely before applying subsequent coats directly over the top without sanding between coats. The beauty of using an aerosol is that the lacquer is applied in droplets (rather than brush strokes) so the opportunity for the acrylic paint to smear is minimised.

Other people will have different techniques, but that's worked to my satisfaction for decades.

Gill
 

Terry Smart

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Hi Lee and Gill

I'd agree wholeheartedly with Gill's recommendation, I know of several people who use our Acrylic aerosol lacquers for this purpose with great success.
Our Acrylics are very hardwearing and include UV filters which help protect whatever is under it, slowing down the fading process.
 
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