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Ac motor shaft pulley advice

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forexpipz

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I think so. It has a groove down it. The pulley is already on. Wanna remove it n put a mdf disc on
 

forexpipz

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I tried lump hammering it with brick chisel. Thing wont budge. Gunna have to grind it off. How to I secure an mdf disc to it?
 

Lowlife

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Have you tried a bit of heat? I find a minute or so with a blowtorch is usually enough to remove stubborn pulleys etc..., especially if it's a different metal to the shaft it will expand at a different rate and break the bond.
 

twothumbs

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I have found that the grub screw, which is extremely hard metal, can cause a slight rise in the shaft and so make removal difficult. You dont want to hammmer the shaft end too much as it can cause minute spreading which despite being small is enough to make the difference in removal. I did a removal some time ago and a few heavy dunts was enough to mean I then had to rub down the shaft to refit it to a bearing.

I like the idea of fixing to the pulley.....it is probably running straight and true so avoiding centring and so on of new mdf disc. Just a thought but 'Picador' used to make pulleys , face plates , etc, which may be an easier solution for you. I havnt seen Picador around for years but someone may know if they are still around. Good luck.
 

WoodMangler

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twothumbs":jnl5q40x said:
Just a thought but 'Picador' used to make pulleys , face plates , etc, which may be an easier solution for you. I havnt seen Picador around for years but someone may know if they are still around. Good luck.
Picador have been out of business for some time, but I just bought several of their pulleys quite cheap on Ebay. Also Millhill Supplies has quite a stock I think.
 

twothumbs

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Thanks for info on Picador. They used to have a good range of machine bits and pieces. Its a pity they are not around anymore. I suppose cheap imports meant people didnt need to make their own. Back to the drawing board.
 

RogerP

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If you follow through the link I gave 3 posts back, although they're now called ABC Polishing, there's still some plummer blocks, flanges, shafts and a multi pulley etc. Check the left-hand pane on the website.
 

Argus

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If you have taken the grub screw out and it still won't budge, go back in with the Allen key - there may be another one underneath.

It's common practice to lock two grub screws together if screwing into a woodruff slot without using the key. Prevents the pulley coming loose.

.
 

kirkpoore1

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Before you beat on it with anything else, can you post a picture, or give us a better description? Does the shaft extend beyond the pulley? What kind of material is the pulley--cast iron, zinc/zamak/pot metal, aluminum, sheet metal, something else? Is there much space between the pulley and the motor? All of these may affect how you want to procede.

If the shaft extends beyond the pulley, your first task is to clean it thoroughly, and file off any mushrooming at the end of the shaft or any dings on the shaft. As others have noted, remove all set (grub) screws and check for two of them in the same hole. Dose liberally with penetrating oil--not WD-40, it's cr*p. Put some down the screw hole(s) as well as at the hub. Walk away for a few hours or a day to give it a chance to get in.

If your pulley is cast iron, you can try with a 3 arm gear puller (which I assume Stew posted, but I can't see it right now). If it's anything else, I'd get a piece of plywood (half inch or thicker, whatever will fit between the pulley and motor), cut a disk a little bigger than the pulley, and put a slot in it to fit over the motor shaft. Then put the disk behind the pulley and try with the puller, hooking onto the plywood to distribute the force. Failing this, warm up the hub with a propane torch, keeping the flame away from the motor. (I've never needed to use heat on motors, though.)

Kirk
 

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