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By paulrockliffe
#1152132
I've got some outdoor planters to paint, they're planed pine. I thought I would investigate linseed paint, but could find a definitive guide on how to prepare the surface for paint, whether I need to prime etc.

Can anyone give a quick over-view of how best to apply the paint, priming and whether I should use knotting solution first?

Thanks
By Selwyn
#1152137
No need to prime. Thin the first coat down a bit - thin it a lot if you want as the extra coat is no harm.

I've thinned with all sorts - kerosine, white spirit, thinners in the past. Don't use it too thickly. I wouldn't bother with knotting as it will hardly bleed through.

Linseed paint is good stuff
By garethharvey
#1152148
Linseed paint is awesome, just wish some of the larger DIY stores would stock it. The modern paints with quick drying chemicals added are cr*p

I use warm linseed oil as a primer, warm it up on the stove then paint it on. Different woods will take in more than others. Wait until this dries then paint with the linseed oil paint. Usually 2-3 coats is sufficient.

Knotting will make a difference, I cannot remember the name of the brand I used, but I think it's a different type to modern knotting.
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By ED65
#1152205
deema wrote:Be extremely careful warming linseed, it is very flammable!
Very might be overstating it a little. While linseed oils are certainly flammable you have to get them pretty darned hot before you have much to worry about as the flash point is north of 220°C. There's little danger of getting to that sort of temperature if you're just intending to warm it through.
By paulrockliffe
#1153598
I got the oil yesterday to prime with and heated it in a pan, was like painting out of the chip pan!

I had sealed the inside of my planters with a bitumen paint and the oil has dissolved this in places. Will it dry out eventually, or can I do anything? Doesn't matter hugely as it's not visible, but would be easier to paint if it was dry.

The top coat arrived today so I might start paining later while I'm watching the election results.
By Jacob
#1153599
Don't know how it works with bitumen but basically it seems to be compatible with any old cr8p and works like a top notch primer. You need to leave it a few days to dry though between coats, and only brush it on thin. If too thick it skims over and won't dry
By garethharvey
#1153633
I painted some Western Red Cedar on Sunday with the linseed oil, this time I put the oil in a small metal pot then pointed my heat gun in to warm it up.

Within an hour or so, I could see patches where it had soaked in. I give the wood a coat of pain on Monday, will give another coat tomorrow and a top coat 5-6 days later.

It will be a lot better when the oil is dry, using the oil first also adds to the longevity of the paint
By paulrockliffe
#1153781
The bitumen hasn't dried at all, so that's a lesson there. Will wipe it down and hope the linseed paint will cope, it's not a huge problem if it doesn't for these, but better if it did.

It's very heavy paint, the tin seems to weigh a lot, spreads very well though, I've hardly used a drop. All seems good so far.
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By ED65
#1153793
paulrockliffe wrote:The bitumen hasn't dried at all, so that's a lesson there.
Bitumen never dries really, that's one of the reasons it works the way it does.

paulrockliffe wrote:It's very heavy paint, the tin seems to weigh a lot...
Linseed oil paint should be just pigment and oil, no lightweight spirits in there and generally no fillers/extenders either, so it'll usually be surprisingly heavy.

Just be thankful you're not using lead pigments, you could put your back out picking up a tin of lead white at an awkward angle!
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By bugbear
#1153794
ED65 wrote:Just be thankful you're not using lead pigments, you could put your back out picking up a tin of lead white at an awkward angle!

But it would make the linseed oil more resistant to fungal attack!

Mmm. White lead. Yum!

BugBear
By garethharvey
#1153804
bugbear wrote:
ED65 wrote:Just be thankful you're not using lead pigments, you could put your back out picking up a tin of lead white at an awkward angle!

But it would make the linseed oil more resistant to fungal attack!

Mmm. White lead. Yum!

BugBear


It's still available to buy under licence.
By Jacob
#1156418
garethharvey wrote:
bugbear wrote:
ED65 wrote:Just be thankful you're not using lead pigments, you could put your back out picking up a tin of lead white at an awkward angle!

But it would make the linseed oil more resistant to fungal attack!

Mmm. White lead. Yum!

BugBear


It's still available to buy under licence.

Yes the paint alone can go mildewy if not cleaned often enough but you won't get fungal attack to the wood itself, if all done properly. Allback advise adding extra titanium to new work as it is anti mildew. More expense but it really does go a very long way and last a very long time.