Would it be a stupid idea ...

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HJC1972

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.... if I were to make the missing bowl rest assembly for my Tyma Cub lathe out of wood?

I'm not so much talking about the tool rest and the tool rest clamp (as I can use the existing ones the sits on the lathe bed) but rather the bar that connects to the lathe chassis and the right angled section that tool rest clamp sits onto. The two items ticked in the image below.

There was one that came up on ebay a little while ago that sold for nigh on what you'd usually pay for a Tyme cub lathe including the bowl rest, which left me scratching my head a little. Just wondering if I used a suitably rupture and impact resistant timber wether I could make these parts myself?
 

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Risky, very risky.
If the tool dug into the item being turned, there could easily be enough force to snap the wood.
 
NOT sure I would want to take that risk, especially when you could quite easily make something from some box section steel that would be stronger and less pro e to warping over time.
 
I owned a cub many years ago and had a spare one of those I kept for a project that never got made ( it happens a lot :lol: ), I had some other bits as well I'll look over the weekend on the offchance I still have it but don't get your hopes up just yet.
 
On the basis that catches on a spindle are likely to be less exciting than on a bowl, does anyone have any thoughts about the long wooden tool rest described in the current issue of Fine Woodworking? I can see the appeal for making multiples of anything longer than a standard tool rest. Is this common for production work?
G
 
Thanks for the replies. I thought it might be a little mad to make the parts from wood as it seems to be confirmed.
 
GarF":3dkmu043 said:
On the basis that catches on a spindle are likely to be less exciting than on a bowl, does anyone have any thoughts about the long wooden tool rest described in the current issue of Fine Woodworking? I can see the appeal for making multiples of anything longer than a standard tool rest. Is this common for production work?
G

The use of wooden tool rests for the occasional long spindle work is a quite common practice, using the standard rest support and the tailstock for support, obviously use shorter steel rests for initial rounding from rough stock in sections if significant shock loads expected and then move to the long rest for smoother finishing and shaping cuts.

For production work I have only ever seen long metal rests used with two banjos.
 
The article is based on a chair maker's design, presumably for use on a machine probably dedicated to turning legs of more or less the same length all the time. It looks to be made from a couple of hardwood 2x6s screwed and glued together , bolted down to the lathe bed. I can see that a metal rest would need less maintenance as I imagine a wooden rest would need dressing fairly often to remove dings. Clearly a pair of metal banjos would be more convenient adjustment wise too.
 
Just a quick update:

For anyone else who may have a Tyme lathe, missing its outboard attachments, I found a thread buried somewhere in this forum that showed a simple, home-made set up, made from tubular steel. So I made my own.
 

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It would cost very little to make in box section steel. I would use something like 40mm box. The welding is simple enough for anybody reasonable competent.

This brings me to a relared point - learning weld. As long as you are not thinking of making a trailer or load bearing structure, then basic welding is not very difficult. You can buy a second hand arc welder ( buzz box) for about £20. Then you look at some reliable online instruction videos and you plactise on scrap metal.
The one thing you absolutely must do is take suitable safety precautions - from fire, shock, arc eye etc.
It is a very handy skill to acquire. You can make things like lathe banjos, and stands for various bits of kit, including lathes, also workbench framing. I buy box section steel in 26 ft lengths, about £14 for 40mm box the last time I bought any. A steel stock holder will be much cheaper than, say, ebay.

K
 

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