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treds1

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Hi i've been lurking here for a while, and thought it was about time I made my first post.

i'm currently planning a new workshop build having not built anything on this scale before, and was hoping for some advise on a few points.

i'm looking to build a 16ft by 12ft timber framed with an apex roof, on a concrete base. I am planning to use 2*4
for the framing and roof struts, then damp proof membrane before battens and shiplap cladding. I am planning on fully insulating between the studs and then osb boarding on the inside. I am going to require planning permission, due to proximity to boundaries and proposed height so am looking to get the design finalized asap so i can put in the application.

i'm sure i will have plenty or questions, but for starters... I have seen conflicting advise as to weather a couple of courses of bricks are required so am a bit confused. Should i be considering two courses of bricks before the framing or not.

I am currently drafting a mock up in SketchUp, that ill post once complete.

Thanks in advance.
 

Charlie Woody

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Well all I can say is that local to me there is a well respected company that builds garages, carports, garden rooms etc etc and they always put a row of concrete blocks onto the concrete base. In the factory the sole plate has a damp proof strip attached which sits on the blocks and the cladding overlaps the outside of the blocks. They say that this way the water runs down the cladding and away and so avoids the sole plate sitting in a pool of water in wet weather.

Hope this helps.
 

OLD

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If the frames are fixed on the edge of the base and the cladding goes past the interface rain is shed clear of the base this design has worked fine for me i use treated timber for sole plate only on a dpc and cast in threaded rod with nut and washer as anchors. I also use breathable membrane under the cladding.
 

MikeG.

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Whilst I'm briefly here, allow me to point you to this which I wrote a while back to help members with their workshop builds. Please put the building on a plinth........you will thank me for years to come.

Cheers

Mike
 

treds1

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Thank you for the advise guys, are there major benefits using a brick plinth? Haven't had any real prior experience laying bricks, so that does put me off going down that route slightly.
 

treds1

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Currently awaiting on planning permission for my workshop build, so am working on finalizing material lists etc. I have been designing the framing with 400mm centres, but is this an overkill or would 600mm centres suffice?

Any thoughts would be appreciated?
 

Shultzy

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treds1, I put mine onto a single course of block paving with DPC between it and the timber, no mortar. As Old said as long as the outer cladding clears the base the water will drip away. Check my build for more tips.
 

beech1948

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I would just look at Mike's diagrams and follow exactly.

I build my workshop on two courses of engineering bricks. I am not a brickie but I just worked on the basis that if I took my time it could not be too hard. The blue engineering bricks are just about impervious to water and are very hard.

The key to Mike's diagrams are the access for cold air above the insulation to provide a means to ventilate the workshop and to remove any accumulated moisture from the outside.

al
 

RogerBoyle

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treds1":1ojj2r56 said:
Currently awaiting on planning permission for my workshop build, so am working on finalizing material lists etc. I have been designing the framing with 400mm centres, but is this an overkill or would 600mm centres suffice?

Any thoughts would be appreciated?
600 centers is fine as you are boarding with OSB on the inside

Roger
 

deserter

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As my former c&j lecturer used to say bricklaying is as simple as putting one on top of two.

I'm sure there's more skill to it really but for a two brick high plinth you really can't go wrong.
 

treds1

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Guys thanks for the responses,

Have planned to basically follow Mikes build thread definitely looks like the way to go. Am definitely going to go with the two brick plinth, i'm fairly confident that I should be able to lay the bricks with minimal difficulty. Ill put up some plans soon.

Unfortunately though plans may have to be put on hold for a while, as I have noticed a roof leak after all the rain we've been had in the last couple of days, and am awaiting a quote from a roofer but is going to require replacing flashings some tiles underlay etc.. So i'm guessing it will be expensive or even more expensive hopefully not as I really don't want another winter in a uninsulated shed!
 

RogerBoyle

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Get more than 1 quote
and check each company with trading standards
Ifthey do not give a land based number other than 0800 they are probably of the traveller variety

Roofing is one area where you are more likely to get a cowboy
Certainly in the Midlands this is the case

Roger
 

treds1

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Roger,

Definitely agree with you, made sure to call them on their land line the first time. Have checked companies house and all looks ok but had not thought of trading standards thanks for the heads up.

On the off chance, can anybody recommend a good roofer in the Norwich / North of Norwich area .

Cheers

Nick
 

treds1

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Right roof disaster over! for the time being at least, so looks like things will be able to progress with the workshop build once planning has been approved (fingers crossed Planning officer has said they cant see any problems with it)

Have been meaning to get round to to putting up the plans for a while, so here goes.



Don't think there are any glaring issues, but please feel free to comment.

I do have one question if anyone can help. I will obviously need to attach the framework to either the brick plinth or to the concrete slab, what would be the best way to go about this?

Cheers

Nick
 

billybuntus

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From experience I've always found windows in a shed of that size are a waste of time. Better off having the wall space. It'll just end up being cold in winter and red hot in summer and as a consequence you may have humidity issues due to the temperature fluctuations.
 

Deejay

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Afternoon Nick

I do have one question if anyone can help. I will obviously need to attach the framework to either the brick plinth or to the concrete slab, what would be the best way to go about this?

build-a-shed-mike-s-way-t39389.html

Shown in red on the first drawing.

Cheers

Dave
 

Cegidfa

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Hello treds,

On my build (Workshop build with a difference, in Projects) I fixed the sole plates down with 7mm x 100mm Rapier screws that fit into a 6mm hole in the brick. And because it's windy here, I also sunk galvanised straps in the concrete as Mike has shown. HTH.

Regards...Dick.
 

treds1

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Thanks for the advice, couple more questions on the back of that.

1. Casting L straps into the base, makes a lot of sense, I'm guessing (forgive the stupid question) that once you have smoothed off the concrete slab, you then have to insert the straps at relevant points and then tidy up the concretes surface around the straps.

2. Can anyone recommend where to get the relevant straps.

3. Will the rapier screws be OK screwed into engineering bricks.

4. On another note, I have been looking at breathable membranes for wrapping the frame, most that I come across are said to be for roofing underlay, is this also suitable for wrapping the frame?

Cheers

Nick
 

Cegidfa

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Morning Nick,

Point 1,
Yes, plunge them in after smoothing. The tricky part is positioning, if you want the straps to go up the studs - as opposed to folding them over the sole plate.
Folding over the plate only ties down the plate. If you fix them up the stud, more of the structure is tied down; this is really what they are designed to do, and what I did. That is why they are so long. :)

Point 2,
The straps can be bought at any builders merchants such as Travis Perkins.
They usually stock what are called ‘Simpson Strong ties’ but any manufacturer will be ok.
Go with whatever is in stock, it should all be to a standard.

Point 3,
Yes, if you are butch enough to drill a hole in the first place :shock: :wink: engineering bricks are hard, be warned. You will probably need a roughty toughty mains hammer drill to have any effect. There are other makes of direct (no rawlpug needed) masonry screws, so, once again, go with what is available. Don’t forget to get the bit (several) that fits your particular screws - usually a T30 Torx bit.

Point 4,
They make specific ‘frame wrap‘ but I don’t know if there is really a difference between roof and frame stuff? Tyvek is very expensive, so try Klober, or once again what is stocked locally. As you haven’t started building yet, can I persuade you to be radical and put the insulation on the outside? This stops dead the thermal bridge from all frame parts and increases the u value substantially. The down side is that you will have to use a celotex/ Quintherm board type which is more expensive, but would save on heating costs in the long run. It would also mean that you don’t need a frame wrap, so that cost can be diverted into the insulation cost. I then intend to use rockwool in the walls and this would act as a sound deadener as well.

Point 5,
Ok, this is my add on. Don’t be ‘backwards at coming forward’ at the builders merchant. :D Be bold and ask for an account. This will give you access to trade prices, and in my case, free delivery on all timber and sheet goods....they want your money in these hard times!

If you have more questions, don’t be afraid to ask. There is no such thing as a dumb question

Regards...Dick.

PS. Billy Buntus has a good point. I have wall and roof windows and it is a pain when the sun comes out. The first thing that is required is curtains, because of the glare.
Also fluorescent lighting gives much reduced shadows, as opposed to daylight. But, it is nice to be able to see outside; if it can be managed, try to fit windows on the north elevation. This gives the kind of light that artists use, so if you get fed up with woodwork :shock: you could always change tack :D
 

treds1

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Dick

Thanks for the info, think that's answered everything (for the moment sure ill be back with more). Should know by the end of the month if planning is granted so trying to get organised so i can make the most of the two bank holidays in May

Thanks

Nick
 
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