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Willow dry or not??

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Anonymous

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Hi all

I just got some Willow from work when they cut down the tree in the carpark. A dozen slabs ranging from about 12 - 15" thick and 24-36" diameter.

Question is this: how should (should I dryit?) I dry it and for how long? I guess sticker it and leave outside but no idea of time.
Should I turn them over or leave them be? Cover with something waterproof or leave to the elements?

I intend to try a bit of turning (for first time) with this wood when it's ready. Now, green? or later, dried?

Thanks for any help

Tony the virgin turner
 
A

Anonymous

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Come on! Not even one reply :evil:

Surely someone in the forum has knowkedge/experience to help :?: :?: :?:
 

Alf

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Sorry, Tony. The mamoth task of typing up all the options was too much for me. :oops: Three things though. Willow is low in the "checking" ratings, so that's good news. The rule of thumb is a year per inch of thickness IIRC. Lastly you might want to get hold of a copy of "The Conversion and Seasoning of Wood" by William H Brown. Lousy example of dust extraction on the front cover, but full of meaty goodness on this kind of thing inside. Oh, and turning wood wet is excellent fun. Even the lousiest beginner gets lovely ribband shavings shooting over their shoulder, so give it a go. I believe the thing to do is turn it oversize and then let it dry, possibly in a plastic bag? Pile of shavings? Something like that anyway. Oh yes, one more thing. You lucky, lucky so-and-so :p (Okay, so that was 5 things...)

Cheers, Alf

P.S. For air drying you want cover but also ventilation. Awww, get the book... :wink:
 
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Anonymous

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Alf said
Awww, get the book...

Good advice my search starts now :D
 

Adam

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Turn them once a year, leave for 2 years minimum outside, then 1 year inside for the really big stuff. Stickered, protected from moisture coming up through the floor - covered only minimally with a tarpaulin - lots of ventilation.

Thats my "finger-in-the-air" opinion.

I'm afraid it's not an area I know much about. So thats my best suggestion.

Adam
 

trevtheturner

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As Alf says, typing all the options would be a mammoth task - aaawh, get the book - seasoning freshly felled timber is a whole art in itself.

However, one important task to do asap is to seal the end grain of boards, slabs and any cut into bowl blanks. The reason for this is that untreated end grain dries much quicker than the rest of the timber and this will inevitably lead to the wood splitting. The traditional way of doing this is to apply a seal of hot wax but there are easier and generally satisfactory options - some use left over paint, either gloss or emulsion. I use waterproof PVA adhesive, undiluted, and have found this successful. As I said, as soon as possible is important.

Best of luck, Trev.
 
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Anonymous

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Hello I have some time turning willow for me is turn as you get it wet or dry I never have any problems with checking or bending out of shape just turn it and have fun ED
 

trevtheturner

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Tony,

See General Chat (Off Topic): Has Axminster Gone Insane?

Have you any spare willow to help out the Windies? :roll: :roll: :roll:
 
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Anonymous

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trevtheturner":2vmq6uim said:
Tony,



Have you any spare willow to help out the Windies? :roll: :roll: :roll:
Hi Trev

The Windies are welcome to a slab or two. :lol: :lol:

cheers

Tony
 
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