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What to use for window frames and pains? Also need a filler.

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Krome10

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Hi all

I've been re-decorating my external wood windows and need to do some maintenance as part of the work. At the moment I'm looking into how to reseal around them and make them weatherproof (where the wood meets the bricks).

Before I ask any questions, I thought I'd best check that such topics are ok in this forum?

If someone can give me the thumbs up (or down), I'll post my questions (or not).

Cheers!
 

AndyT

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I'm sure there have been plenty of similar questions and this is sufficiently wood-related!

It would be really helpful if you could post a picture or two of the gaps - these would also clarify lots of other stuff which might be relevant, such as the age of the property, construction method, type of windows etc.
 

Krome10

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Thanks Andy. OK, first for the info..... The windows are wooden. Pine I guess. The property is 20 years old. Standard brick. And I'm talking here about the outside of the windows.....

We have had the windows painted and have the following jobs left:

*****Fill the gaps in the frame joints where needed.
Basically, I mean where the different parts of the frame meet, small nail holes - that kind of thing. Can anyone recommend a decent filler for this kind of work please?

*****Re-seal the individual window panes
The painter did quite a poor job! He painted over the existing silicone/putty/mastic (???) which tbh was not in the best condition anyway. His paint lines were quite poor and over zealous. So I'm thinking my two options are to either:
- Remove/scrap away ALL the existing silicone/putty/mastic (???), then repaint, then seal with an appropriate product.
- Cut the existing paint with a blade just to straighten it up and get it off the glass in the over zealous areas. This would inevitably result in me slicing a bit of the existing silicone/putty/mastic (???) away too. Once done, go over with a clear silicone to re-seal and to ensure the paint and old putty is "stuck down" firmly.

I wondered which method would be best and what frame to glass sealants are recommended please?

*****Re-seal the frames to the brick sidings
I've been looking at all kinds of different sealants and trying to choose one. What a quagmire! They all seem to say the minimum width should be 5mm. Some of my gaps are as small as 1mm width so I'm not sure which of the products will be suitable.

The gaps are quite deep in places (up to 70mm) and I was planning on using a low expanding foam as a backing. I've bought a can of it, but the trouble is the applicator tube is too big for most of the gaps I have, and I fear that without being able to get the tube into the gaps I'm going to make an almighty mess!

I should add that above the windows there was some loose mortar which I have removed and here the gaps are a fair bit bigger. See pics. Was planning on filling the gaps with foam and then putting sealant over the whole lot.

So what's the best way to fill small gaps around frames (especially in the smaller in the 1 - 5mm region) and which products are recommended?

Here are a few photos to help illustrate:

149000_148264_50266_40057319.jpg


149000_148264_50267_72432981.jpg


149000_148264_50268_82324824.jpg


IMG_1355.JPG


IMG_1356.JPG



Any help and advice would be fantastic.

Cheers

Max
 

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NLH

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Mp20 mastic is very good for the outside sealer it has no silicone in it wich means its paintable :)

Also for the exterior filling use a two part filler not a ready mixed one
 

pro-joiner

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Hi,
I would use polysulphide, it comes in a tube that fits jizz guns (trade term for skeleton gun) and comes in a range of coulors.

-point around the frame use about a 3/8" bead, point using a finger trowel and a mix of fairly liquid and water.
-cap around the glass with a very fine bead of polysulphide
-also i would fill the gaps between the beads and framme with polysulphide

polysulphide although the price may shock you, is totally water proof and is overpaintable.

its very very sticky so dont be tempted to point using "a lick of the finger and a smudge" it isnt silcone!!!

My boss once supplied me with a tube of "frame sealent" it was a big brand (sorry cant remember which, maybe unibond) basically it was brown waterbased caulk.....no good.

dow

And that in my opinion would be the correct way of doing the job.

Mark
 

neilyweely

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Hi
Wickes sell a two part, epoxy based filler for external woodwork. It is good stuff, if a little expensive. It is best to use in conjunction with their wood preservative and wet rot treatment, both good too.

I have just done some beautiful old sash windows. Did it thus;

Removed all old damaged timber and replaced. Grafted in diagonally where necessary.
Treated all timber thoroughly with correct treatment.
Fill all defects and gaps with 2 part filler.
Mask off all glass 3mm in from timber frame so paint overlaps the glass sealing timber and glass.
Prime and undercoat.
Denib with 120 grit.
Use frame sealant where necessary. Make sure this is a sealant which can be painted over.
Allow plenty of time for everything to go off.
Top coat 1.
Denib again, 240 grit.
Top coat 2. Fin.

Make sure you take everything apart to paint as it is a false economy to try and do anything else. You will foul it all up if you try otherwise. Board up if necessary.

I don't think I have missed anything rudimentary. Probly have. Someone will be along soon to tell me off, eh?

HTH

Neil
 

Roughcut

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I would say that all the prep work (sealing/filling) should of been done first and then overpainted.
And any decent painter worth his salt would not of walked away from the job leaving paint on the glass. :roll:
Do yourself a favour mate and don't ask him to do any more work for you.
 

neilyweely

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Roughcut

Tape off the window, leaving a small gap between the frame and the glass. You want a tiny bit of paint to seal that join between the two.



Read more: How to Paint a Window Frame | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_14419_paint-win ... z27HfqgfPj
From 'e-how'.

The paint seals the two together stopping ingress of water. General consensus seems to be the same. Done a few now and they all seem to be holding up well.

Mind you, they do seem a bit rough and there is paint in the middle of the window. Think you are right about this fella. i don't know about leaving paint on the glass, I don't know if I ever managed to get paint on the glass like that!!

Neil
 

RogerM

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I have sealed between the woodwork and the blockwork with CT1. It's great stuff. Sticks to anything, even under water, doesn't shrink or crack, and can be over painted. Not cheap at around £10 per tube, but the results are terrific. The clear CT1 looks far more clear than any other similar product, and stays clear.
 

Ollie78

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Quick tip.
When trowelling in polysulphide or similar gap filling `caulky` stuff. Instead of using soapy water or something you can use gorrilla wipes or similar trade wipes to keep it smooth. just wipe the tool (or finger) with the wipe.
Each time you wipe of the excess you are also lubricating the tool for the next swipe.

Note. Best not to use car body filler, it is likely to crack over time. It is not designed to expand and contract with the wood.

Ollie
 

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