What a waste

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Bingy man

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I recently made a small purchase at my local Toolstation but they made a mistake on their stock levels so they ended up owing me 2 speedfit 15 mm elbows which they said they would post as it was their mistake. Fair play I thought and left it at that . Got home tonight and this was on my doorstep.
I didn’t need or ask for the catalog but amazed at the waste of cardboard to deliver 2 elbows . Anyone else get this with deliveries.
 

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You are looking at it from a consumer point of view, not as a business whose activities include shipping things from a warehouse at a price that you find reasonable.

Put yourself in the position of business owner. Is it realistic to stock a cardboard box for every conceivable shape, size and combination of items you sell? Would your customer be willing to pay for this curated service? Does the despatch cost (writ large, as a process, not just the face value of the stamp) scale with box volume? Do you weigh every item you send and calculate to the nearest penny the most appropriate postage method and cost? At what point does the labour to do this outweigh the cost of a standardised solution?

No. You have a small (rationalised) range of packaging that fits most of your orders. Based on your daily volume, you negotiate a fixed fee with your carrier for each box of that dimension, whether it is bulging at the seams or 99% air.

Rationalised packaging is also easier to handle automatically. The box would start as a flat pack. It can be automatically 'inflated', the warehouse person chucks in the items and then the lid closing, sealing and label pasting is totally automatic. At the end, it stacks on a pallet in a logical way.
 
You are looking at it from a consumer point of view, not as a business whose activities include shipping things from a warehouse at a price that you find reasonable.

Put yourself in the position of business owner. Is it realistic to stock a cardboard box for every conceivable shape, size and combination of items you sell? Would your customer be willing to pay for this curated service? Does the despatch cost (writ large, as a process, not just the face value of the stamp) scale with box volume? Do you weigh every item you send and calculate to the nearest penny the most appropriate postage method and cost? At what point does the labour to do this outweigh the cost of a standardised solution?

No. You have a small (rationalised) range of packaging that fits most of your orders. Based on your daily volume, you negotiate a fixed fee with your carrier for each box of that dimension, whether it is bulging at the seams or 99% air.

Rationalised packaging is also easier to handle automatically. The box would start as a flat pack. It can be automatically 'inflated', the warehouse person chucks in the items and then the lid closing, sealing and label pasting is totally automatic. At the end, it stacks on a pallet in a logical way.
No not a box for every parcel but a limited range to cover what they sell not so much what we purchase. 2 small elbows could of gone into a small Jiffy bag which in turn I could of re used. Surely the smaller the packaging the more that can be carried or a smaller vehicle can be used .
 
Amazon have been trialling an AI packaging tool which uses generic cardboard sheets, analyses the item size and cuts and folds the cardboard to suit the item.

That is a neat idea.
 

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