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Wadkin 12 BGP Buying advice

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partsandlabour

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Hello all. This is my first post on here!

I'm migrating from my home garage to a proper workshop and I'm looking for something more robust than my current Kity table saw.

I've been offered a 1968 Wadkin 12 BGP panel saw in bits (I'm told it's all there and it looks to be) for £200. Single phase motor fitted (I've seen that run). It will doubtless require some attention to recomission it as it's in bits, though it looks to be in reasonable condition.

Does anyone else out there have one of these saws? What are your opinions on it?

As background, I wasn't really in the market for a panel saw - more a decent bench saw, as I find I can get excellent duplication of cuts on sheets with my festool rail saw and some 'stick' jigs for setting the cutting size. How accurate are the panel cuts on these BGP saws? Are they difficult to get set up runnning true?

So I've got plenty of space for the saw, but clear space is always of value. Is this any good just as a bench saw or does the table/sliding bars etc get in the way? Can the sliding table be stripped off and the casing underneath split to make it become more like an AGS or should I be looking for a different saw? Is this the saw for me?

Also, any opinions on single phase machinery versus 3 phase? My new place has 3 phase power.

Any input gratefully accepted!

Ian

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nathandavies

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I don't own a BGP but I do have a wadkin cp32 panel saw. I would have thought that once set up correctly, the bgp would be spot on. If so you'll be selling your track saw and won't look back, it'll be quicker and easier. If you have the time and inclination to sort this saw out I would say it is worthwhile getting it. If you really don't like it then you will be able to sell it and buy an ags with change I would have thought. 3 phase is better than single, it has more oomph, (in my world electricity is black magic and I don't understand the more complex principles)

hth

nathan
 

partsandlabour

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Thanks for the input Nathan. I suppose the cp32 is a few steps up again from what I'd be buying but I guess the build quality is going to be comparible?

Yeah electricity is a mysterious beast to me too. 'More oomph' makes sense to me!
 

partsandlabour

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Thanks for the link Nathan. The one I'm poised to buy is the older model, the 12 BGP rather than the 1200. It's this one..


advancedmachinery (dot!) co (dot!) uk/content/document/BGP12new.pdf


You'll need to glue the link back together etc as I don't have privileges to post links!
 

nathandavies

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If I was in your situation I wouldn't hesitate to buy it but others may disagree. Set up correctly, I think you'll be smiling every time you use it.

Nathan
 

RobinBHM

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I can remember using a BGP saw at college, it is heavily engineered like all wadkin machines and capable of precision work. I would consider it to be somewhere between a dimension saw and a panel saw. Im not sure if it can have the fence set to the front of the sliding table for panel work.

If you have the space go for it. You will be amazed at the range of jigs and fixtures that can be added to a sliding table and it will produce repeatable accuracy all day long. At that price you could easily sell it on if you dont like it. (I could imagine a few takers on here!). Being single phase makes old equipment more sought after.

Only disadvantage is it is prob heavy, around 600kgs. Still moveable on a pallet truck.
 

partsandlabour

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Thanks Robin and Nathan, I think you fellas have helped make my mind up - I'm gonna go for it.

Now comes the temptation to sandblast it and re-paint it while it's still in bits.. hmm maybe I'm getting carried away and should just get using it!

Yeah 600kg built is pretty heavy I suppose. I've got a pallet truck but I could do with a gantry to hoist the components around as I build it -my back is groaning just at the thought of it!
 

nathandavies

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if you fancy tarting it up, you should get over to the Canadian woodworking forum or youtube and look up tool613 or jack English, and his wadkin pk.

nathan
 

partsandlabour

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nathandavies":2ukt6yre said:
if you fancy tarting it up, you should get over to the Canadian woodworking forum or youtube and look up tool613 or jack English, and his wadkin pk.

nathan
Yes that is a glorious machine! It made me think about painting this machine in the same blue/grey as the older wadkin PK models as you can't get the original green hammerite anymore (apparently the closest is RAL 6011 resida green, solid colour)

I just found this fella on the Australian woodwork forum who has refurbished the exact same model - he got his at even more of a bargain though! $53!!

http://www.woodworkforums.com/showthread.php?t=149296
 

beech1948

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Hi,

You face numerous small hurdles to get it back to a sound machine. I have found that the USA web site www.owwm.com is worth registering on. OWWM stands for Old Woodworking Machines. In there you will find help if you ask, descriptions of how to execute various rebuilt tasks from clearing rust, to replacing bearings, to lubrication, painting etc etc etc as well as tool613 and others who can give you some Wadkin help.

Ask here at ukworkshop as well and search for Wadking refurbs as a few have gone past us.

It helps if you worked on cars as a youngster or some other mechanical thing.

Al
 

partsandlabour

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beech1948":axd8o1q0 said:
Hi,

You face numerous small hurdles to get it back to a sound machine. I have found that the USA web site http://www.owwm.com is worth registering on. OWWM stands for Old Woodworking Machines. In there you will find help if you ask, descriptions of how to execute various rebuilt tasks from clearing rust, to replacing bearings, to lubrication, painting etc etc etc as well as tool613 and others who can give you some Wadkin help.

Ask here at ukworkshop as well and search for Wadking refurbs as a few have gone past us.

It helps if you worked on cars as a youngster or some other mechanical thing.

Al
Cheers Al, I'll give OWWM a look. Apparently the saw ran fine before it was disassembled and mothballed, but I've found that a few things are missing or bolts seized. I love a challenge and have stripped and rebuilt a couple of motorcycles and loads of other stuff. It's finding the time to rebuild that will be the issue - that and the weight of the components which means I will need to hoist them around as I work. But I'll work through it methodically while doing other projects. I've got a feeling that it'l take me a while though!
 
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