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Veneer softener recipes?

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Lowlife

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Anyone know what's in some of the commercial veneer softeners? I've tried various homebrews but they either don't work too well, or they leave residues that cause finishing problems later on.
 

andersonec

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I just spray mine with water and let it sit for a couple of minutes. I have seen it done with a hot iron with extra water sprayed on, this will also flatten it.

To make it soak in quicker you could add maybe one or two drops of washing up liquid to a mug of water, this would just act as a wetting agent.

The usual mixture is Glycerin and alcohol but don't know the ratio's..

Andy
 

Ian

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This is what I use - it softens the veneer so it won't crack in the press and once dry stays flat for quite a while.

• 4 parts water
• 1 part alcohol
• 2 part glycerine
• 2 parts resin glue

I use borden UL39 resin.

Make up the mixture and soak the veneers one at a time for about 10mins, take them out and let the excess drain of. Press with fibre glass mesh and paper towels. The mesh stops the veneer sticking to the paper.

Change the towels every 12 hours and press for about a week.

HTH

Ian
 

Lowlife

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Ian, when you say alcohol do you mean pure alcohol, and if so where do you get it from? I can get rubbing alcohol from the chemists, but I believe it has a percent or two of some sort of oil in it?
 

Lowlife

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Ah thanks, I'll check the rubbing alcohol first as I can get that easily and in smaller quantities.

You don't have any finishing problems using this recipe?
 

Sgian Dubh

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Lowlife":zw55ve4j said:
Anyone know what's in some of the commercial veneer softeners? I've tried various homebrews but they either don't work too well, or they leave residues that cause finishing problems later on.
I can't answer the first part of your question, but the recipes and methods described here at my website all work well. At least they do based on my experience using them, and without any finishing problems I've come across. Perhaps it's one of the recipes I describe that have caused you problems, but only you will know that at this point. Slainte.
 

Mr T

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[quoteI can't answer the first part of your question, but the recipes and methods described here at my website all work well. At least they do based on my experience using them, and without any finishing problems I've come across. Perhaps it's one of the recipes I describe that have caused you problems, but only you will know that at this point. Slainte.][/quote]

I've used Richard's method and found it works.

Chris
 

Ian

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No finishing issues with a shellac finish - I used it on oak burr which was very buckled and it worked great.

Just make sure it gets well soaked - if it was just sprayed on with a mist spray bottle then you could have finishing issues as it won't go deep enough and when it gets its final sand it could be patchy.





Merry Christmas to all.

Ian
 

Lowlife

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Thanks guys, I'll have to give these recipes a try, the ones I've used previously have all basically been variations of the same ingredients, possibly the problems have been caused by the proportions I used, or maybe the finish (cellulose lacquer) is more sensitive than others.

The main problem I've had has been fisheyes, normally caused by oil, grease, or silicone contamination, the trouble with veneers is that you don't know where they've been stored or how they've been handled previously, so can't rule out contamination of some sort no matter how careful you are with them.
 
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