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Vann

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Hi all,

I picked up these irons with a recent purchase.
Odd irons.JPG

At first I thought they might be from some obscure Stanley plane (not that I can get into Blood & Gore to search :roll: ). However when they arrived this morning I found they're ¾" wide and 3/16" thick which makes them a bit heavy for anything Stanley.

I'd say maybe off a spindle moulder if they were pairs, but even the top two aren't quite identical)?

Any ideas?

Cheers, Vann.
 

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bugbear

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Vann":3dgczhah said:
Hi all,

I picked up these irons with a recent purchase.
At first I thought they might be from some obscure Stanley plane (not that I can get into Blood & Gore to search :roll: ). However when they arrived this morning I found they're ¾" wide and 3/16" thick which makes them a bit heavy for anything Stanley.

I'd say maybe off a spindle moulder if they were pairs, but even the top two aren't quite identical)?

Any ideas?

Cheers, Vann.
Agreed - some kind of rotary moulder.

BugBear
 

Jacob

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Spindle moulder cutters for a square block. They don't have to be identical as long as one cuts and the other balances it fairly closely. Even if they are identical is usually easier to set one for the cut and the other set back a bit but balancing the weight.
 

Allylearm

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Jacob":3twi2nyp said:
Spindle moulder cutters for a square block. They don't have to be identical as long as one cuts and the other balances it fairly closely. Even if they are identical is usually easier to set one for the cut and the other set back a bit but balancing the weight.
A bit more detail on setting this up for those unfamiliar.

Utilise a cardboard or formica marking board which is cut out to suit the head width but larger than projection of blade and some strategic lines drawn horizontal on the marking board so you can trace around outline of cutter and match the other cutter to this marking (horizontal & verticaly), allowing it to be slightly under so one cutter cuts and the other is a balance.

The other method is to align on a setting up jig which is a horizontal axle to take the head and you can mark again to align cutters or on plate supplied. Weinig and Wadkin have similar setup stands but are pricey even second hand. This lets you set projection very accuratly. You can do this to do a quick setup and then on to Grinder Machine to follow template and cut blades in situ on block which is more accurate other than the next method below. A lot better for multiple wings over the standard two in my opinion. I used to have one which was linked ot template cutter which was not unlike the wee trend trimmer CNC which came in a small booth. Or you made your profiles by hand.

Which is much easier now with replacement tips which are held in locked position by torx screw and can be done on the Spindle or Moulder so not losing time taking off the machine.

The open slot cutters are now illiegal(UK) due to being able to loosen and become a projectile from the block, very scarey when they fly seen one go through a roof many years ago, all I heard was the bang.
 

bugbear

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Back in the 50's and 60's some (large) cross cuts saws (big DeWalts?) claimed some very limited moulding capabilities.

Could these narrow cutters be similar to those?

BugBear
 

Jacob

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Allylearm":350oc4k3 said:
.....
. Weinig and Wadkin have similar setup stands but are pricey even second hand. This lets you set projection very accuratly. You can do this to do a quick setup and then on to Grinder Machine to follow template and cut blades in situ on block which is more accurate other than the next method below. A lot better for multiple wings over the standard two in my opinion. I used to have one which was linked ot template cutter which was not unlike the wee trend trimmer CNC which came in a small booth. Or you made your profiles by hand.. .............
I've always done it freehand, starting with a sample of a moulding to be copied. Rough out with angle grinder. Make into exact fit square on to the moulding with small wheels on a bench grinder, and files. Back off at 45º ish to sharpen. Then the clever bit - deepen all the hollows (and other fine tuning) so that the profile will fit at the actual cutting angle. This is done by eye and repeated offering up to the moulding and can produce a perfect copy.
Making a spindle cutter is exactly the same as making a moulding plane cutter.
 

Allylearm

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Jacob: you do what you have to hand and what works. I once talked to a fellow trademan who did not a unsimilar method to yours.

The modern template method and Router booth is a nice bit of kit and if you can draw it you can cut it and it is very accurate as you profile the cutter on the grinder so you get near enough spot on on all the wings. Alas this method is going like the dodo and disposables seems the way forward for the bigger manufacturers as it is less setup/sharpening and no costly employment of Saw Doctor. Like most things its done as progress and to be honest like good machine men the Saw Doctors are not numerous as they once were, well in my neck of the woods. I am still smarting listening to a recent broadcast that Kentucky Fried Chicken is getting apprenticeships in being a manager. What ever next, apprenticeships were for skills, I do not not to belittle Kentucky Fried Chicken but training their Managers is not an apprenticeship.

Back on track, I traded in our Unimat 6 Head for a Powermat 6 head, the new one is faster and is CNC setup, this was the way forward as setup or tool changing once programmed once can be 5/10 minutes so profiling is cheaper and less man hours so more economic. You programme the heads in to configure your mould say T&G, it even takes a picture of the head, got a web cam on it and the picture comes up when you are setting up so it stores all cutters or heads you have previously programmed in its memory and knows there dimensions. The programme then has HSK head configurations so there is no spindle only a tool head and pneumatic clamp, all my heads have been fitted on the carrier configured to the machine clamping system. The machine then when it registers the head is in place configures itself to profile setup which you have told it you are doing, it will not switch on and checks the operator has configured it and asks him accordingly and moves all but one head into position, if it goes off position it stops and asks to reconfigure. Now this system relys on moulded cutters be proifiled on the head or the alternative and cheaper method as no profiling outlay is replacement tip tooling. That is what I have done and sold our Grinders Rondomat and setup and all my tooling is more or less HKS headed so it can move between varied machinery. Except the Moulder, Weinig had there own head configuration and it does not fit on my CNC Spindle or CNC Router. I have now been informed by the rep that this is being fixed and future machinery will configure for tooling to be able to go on other machinery as they have recently bought into a CNC Router maker. As for finish the replacement tips gives me a great finish, the only better finish was a Waco I once operated but a real beast to setup as not fast and noisy but as far as I am aware is still going in the same Joinery/Building Company. The finish on Red Pine Sideboards finishings was glass.
 

Allylearm

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bugbear":kdz73z0j said:
Back in the 50's and 60's some (large) cross cuts saws (big DeWalts?) claimed some very limited moulding capabilities.

Could these narrow cutters be similar to those?

BugBear
Some trenchers had varied tooling interchangeable, once a dewalt fired up with a trencher on the whirr was never forgotten.
 
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