• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Thicknesser Restoration

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

adest1

Member
Joined
13 Apr 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
9
Location
Derby, UK
Hi, I have recently begun restoring a 1950's Junior Whitehead thicknesser. I don't have much experience with tool restoration, so am looking for some help!

I need to remove the V-belt (triangular profile with no teeth) shown in the below image [Arrow 1: Yellow]. The lever [Arrow 2: White] applies inward pressure onto the belt [Arrow 3: Purple]. I have disengaged this lever so that no pressure is being applied (shown below). However, i am finding that despite this, there is still too much tension in the belt to remove it from aluminium pulleys.

Does anyone know how i might remove this belt without damaging the pulleys? Is it expected that this belt should be so tight even with the tensioner disengaged?

Any advise would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Tim

IMG_0334.jpg
 

Inspector

Nyuck, Nyuck, Nyuck!
Joined
18 Jun 2006
Messages
2,491
Reaction score
634
Location
Saskatoon, SK., Canada
By hand start turning the big gear with I assume the small pulley is attached. With your other hand apply pressure on the belt towards you such that it rides up onto the rim of the pulley. You may have to leaver the belt with a screwdriver. Once more is outside the pulley groove than in it will come off completely. Kind of like taking a tire off a rim.

Pete
 

adest1

Member
Joined
13 Apr 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
9
Location
Derby, UK
Thanks Pete. With your advice i just bit the bullet and used a screwdriver to lever it off. I was just really worried about damaging the pulleys as they are only aluminium, & one of them already appears to be slightly damaged (maybe from a previous owners attempt). Thankyou for your help.

I'm sure i'll have lots more questions as i continue!
 

PeterCh

Member
Joined
3 Apr 2014
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Galway/Ireland
Hi Tim i have some problem with assembly same planer as Yours. Would You share few photos? I need photo from other side so i can see infeed and outfeed rollers with spring i dont know where they suppose to be. Ideally photo without tables so i can see how to assembly rollers etc. Also i am not sure if i miss some parts from cutter block like there is some space in cutterblock for grub screw but no threads at all. Thanks for help.
2020-10-19 16.51.29.png
2020-10-19 16.50.43.png
2020-10-19 16.49.34.jpg
 

adest1

Member
Joined
13 Apr 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
9
Location
Derby, UK
Hi Peter. Unfortunately, my restoration is not finished and i haven't made it round to the cutter block assembly yet. You're planer isn't exactly the same as mine, but certainly appears to follow a very similar design.

I'll try and put it back together tomorrow (at least dry fit) so that i can take some better photos. But for now all I have is the one below.

This image shows the grooved infeed roller and the brass bar (I've seen it called both a "chip breaker" and a "Pressure Bar"). You can see that a spring puts downward pressure on the infeed roller (there is similar spring for the pressure bar also, but i'd removed it before taking this photo). There is then some adjustment screws that screw down through the top of the casting in order to compress the springs and adjust the amount of downward pressure that is applied.

IMG_0337.JPG


As mentioned above. Apologies from the rubbish photo. i'll try and upload some better ones tomorrow.
 

adest1

Member
Joined
13 Apr 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
9
Location
Derby, UK
The second picture you have uploaded above is quite zoomed in, but if I'm not mistaken it is a picture of the cutter head (with knifes removed).

The larger threaded hole i believe is designed for allowing a knife setting jig to be attached to the cutter head. My machine didn't come with this accessory, but i'm not too worried because i don't think its completely necessary. Also, after-market jigs can be purchased.

The second smaller hole that has no thread is used to house some small springs. These springs push the knifes upward. I don't think they serve much of a purpose once the blades are fully fixed into place, but i can certainly see how they would make life easier when setting the knifes. Once again, i'll take a photo or two of mine tomorrow.
Tim
 
Top