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Anonymous

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hullo everyone, i've been lurking for a while so its time to go public.

Has anyone here seen the latest issue of the Woodworker? They have done a test of 14.4 volt drills, but the winner is a 15.6volt metabo
How can it be in the test when it isnt the same voltage?
do u experts know why it got picked for it?
greta forum by the way!
Trev.
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi trev and welcome to the forum , weird with the ole cordless test perhaps they did not have an 18v handy to win :lol:
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Trev

I raised this one a little while ago when I had my copy of The Woodworker delivered. I didn't have a problem with them including the Metabo as I thought you could classify the 14.4 and 15.6 together. My argument waas that if you were going to include any 15.6 drills in the test that you should include the very best drill available today at 15.6, namely the Panasonic.

The Panny is still way ahead of the opposition and is coming down in price as well.

Interestingly I found a pdf on the Popular Woodworking site http://www.popularwoodworking.com/features/12vdrills.0203.pdf which reviewed 12V drills. The way that they have reviewed the drills is just exceptional. There are "real world" tests, with the results published for all to see.

They also reinforced their opinion that 12 volts is more than enough power for every task in a woodshop.

The DW drill received this accolade, "This is an adequate drill when used for sporadic, demanding tasks, but for our money, if you're looking for long duration performance, this one falls short". Or, the Fein, "Whilst the engineering put into this drill will guarantee it's longevity for years to come, it's performance and high price make it difficult to recommend it highly".


Cheers
Neil
 

Noel

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Yes Neil,

Must concur with your thoughts. The Panasonic is king. My first decent cordless was a Dewally 14.5v which I thought was fantastic and cost well over 200 dabs 2/3 years ago. Got the Panasonic 15.4v about a year ago and it just doesn't put the Dewally in the shade, it stuffs it in a pitch dark hole in the ground. There is just no comparison. The sheer ergonomics and the dynamics (ie it feels like....no - public forum).....you get the picture, I like the Panasonic.

Saw the Pop WW test when it came out and all the "screw per drill" testing. As you say, a proper test.

Anyway, a damn fine drill as agent (can't remember his name) would say.
Anybody know what I'm on about?

Rgds

Noel
 

Gill

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Noely":geoizwfw said:
Anyway, a damn fine drill as agent (can't remember his name) would say.

Anybody know what I'm on about?
'Twas Agent Dale Cooper. I know who killed Laura Palmer. Pass the cherry pie, please. And that's a damn fine cup of coffee.
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Gill and Noel

GillD":3jiylhlz said:
'Twas Agent Dale Cooper. I know who killed Laura Palmer. Pass the cherry pie, please. And that's a damn fine cup of coffee.
Now, as I didn't have a clue who you were talking about, I'm trying to work out whether I'm too young or too old. :?

I suspect that it might be because I'm too old. :roll:

Cheers
Neil
 

Noel

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No Neil, not too old or too young (hope not, anyway), more a case of discriminating taste, wouldn't you agree Gill? Good thing you know nothing about Bob....

Rgds

Noel, in a jestful mood.
 

Alf

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Heck Neil, even I know what they're talking about, and I was definitely too young at the time. :wink: "Twin Peaks" ring a bell at all?

Welcome, Trev :D My personal opinion is The Wooodworker's been going downhill since about 1954 :wink: , so I haven't seen one of their tests in a long time. The one's I have seen have never given me much confidence to be honest, and this kind of moving of goalposts just confirms me in that view. Shame, 'cos it used to be the best mag bar none. :(

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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HulloAlf, i agree with you about hte goalposts thing.
I am thinking about buying a 14volt drill so i thought the test would help me out. Im more baffled thanever now tho. are all the tool tests done by chucking in a tool that is close but not quite the same? how is that meant to help people like me choose a drill.

trev
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Alf

Alf":116v6kbh said:
Heck Neil, even I know what they're talking about, and I was definitely too young at the time. :wink: "Twin Peaks" ring a bell at all?
Ah, that was something I studiously avoided. I can't for the life of me think why, but I probably had a good reason at the time. :?

Cheers
Neil
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Trev

iluvwood":3uexx310 said:
I am thinking about buying a 14volt drill so i thought the test would help me out.
I've had a conversation with Andy King about this and his he was surprised that the Metabo was included. He wouldn't have included it in GWW.

I'll start a new thread, about 12v vs 14.4v, that might help you.

If you can afford to spend about 200 then don't waste your time with reviews just go out and buy the Panasonic 15.6 Drill/Driver. You won't be disappointed.

Cheers
Neil
 

Aragorn

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I'm looking into buying a couple of new drills. One to use as a driver (I am looking at the Festool CDD12v) and a more powerful one for drilling (i.e. around 14.4 upwards).
There seems to be lots of praise for the Panasonic here and I'm just wondering what it's based on?
Can anyone personally recommend it (and why) or point me to some good reviews?
(Also if anyone knows the cheapest place to buy either, it'll save me some searching!)

So, I'm not asking much then! :oops:

Thanks
Aragorn
 

johnelliott

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VOLTAGE IS NOT POWER. POWER IS DERIVED FROM VOLTAGE MULTIPLIED BY CURRENT. IF YOU DON'T KNOW THE CURRENT DELIVERED WHEN THE MOTOR IS UNDER LOAD THEN YOU DON'T KNOW THE POWER
 

Noel

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Aragorn,

There's plenty of reviews of the Panasonic in the UK and the US. I'll dig out a few when I get a chance. I have heaped praise on it on the basis of an owner/user.

Rgds

Noel
 

Adam

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OK, Power is voltage x amps, but given batteries on average (and thats big generalisation) can only all supply a given amount of current, if you have a higher voltage, that does give a reference - that it may well be more powerful. So... whilst a good manufacturer can eek out more from a 12V than a rubbish manufacturer from a 18V, once you get into a decent bracket of manufacturers, on average 18V is more powerful than a 12V as they all use the same batteries with the same current output.

You only have to see the 9.6V stuff in B&Q, with a battery smaller than a coupld of duracells to deduce it's going to have no power.

Adam
 

kityuser

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energy (V x I x t) is sometimes a good factor to consider. ie AHr for a given voltage

whats the point of having a battery that can supply 5amps @ 18V for only a second???

ie in a recent mag (can`t remember which one) a cheaper brand only managed to drive 10 screws into some 4x2 whereas a makita (I think) drove over 100 in!

of course you could get into that age-old discussion about what you mean by "power".

just because a drill has a wacking great big "powerful" battery doesn`t mean that you are going to get a "powerfull dirll", its all about how the manufacturer developes the power from the battery, clutch, gear/box, motor.
It certainly has more potential to be a "powerfull dirll", but this is`nt always the case.

power is a commonly misused word, is merly means "rate of energy "flow""

instead of power, do you mean torque? longetivity? (spelling)


just my 2ps worth

steve
 

Aragorn

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Thanks Steve
Yes, I'm refering to torque and longetivity when I ask about a "more powerful drill". It very much looks like the panny has both.
For example, my current 14.4v Richmond can drive screws all day, but when I go to drilling large holes, it gives up pretty quickly.
So, I go over to the 2nd battery. That gives up after a while too, even when fully charged.
So by "power" I'm not trying to be technical at all, just asking about a drill that can cope with a heavy work load (i.e. manage to drill the hole) and can then keep going for a decent length of time! At least until the 2nd battery is recharged.


Cheers
A
 

johnelliott

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kityuser":h59ve185 said:
of course you could get into that age-old discussion about what you mean by "power".


steve
Where motors are concerned, especially car engines, power is normally measured by measuring the torque produced within a certain time. This idea is entirely applicable to drill/drivers. After all, no point in having 100ft/lbs of torque if it's only at at 10rpm! What we are looking for is sufficient torque at a suitable rotational speed, delivered over a decent period of time.

John
 
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Anonymous

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In DC series wound motors such as those found in a battery drill, the torque is very high at low speeds (especially starting torque). This is their only advantage over shunt or compound wound motors and why they are usually used.

When measuring power in a car engine the power developed is found from:

Torque x Angular velocity

No significant time period is required for the measurement as the angular velocity is in radians/second and quickly determined
 
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