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tx2man

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Hi all,
my neighbour has just given me an ACORN no:4, that he found in a box in his loft.
It looks in pretty good shape except for a couple of splits in the handle.
Is it :D or :cry:

He says he thinks he's got some more bits and bobs up there if i want them :wink:

TX
 
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Anonymous

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Nice one TX. Congrats.

Not sure how bad the cracks are. I am currently thinking of making replacements for the plastic efforts on a couple of Stanleys. I will be using Beech as I have a few offcuts knocking about and figure that a scroll saw will do most of the work. Should be fairly easy.
 

tx2man

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thanks :D

Tony, no scroll saw :cry:

Dave, i nonchanantly(?) mumbled that i might :twisted:

Anobium, thanks, last resort would be to buy them :shock:

BUT still i beseech thee,is the ACORN a :D or a :cry: ?
please score 1-10

TX
 
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Anonymous

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Bandsaw? Coping saw? Rasps? Spokeshave? Draw Knife? Sanding drum in drill press?

You can do it :wink:
 

Alf

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TX,

Sorry 'bout the delay <turns to "A" in British Planemakers>

Acorn: Trade name used by J A Chapman of Sheffield; also used by Stanley Works (G.B) Ltd. for second quality planes after their acquisition of Chapman.
As you all know, of course, :wink: James Arscott Chapman Ltd was manufacturing between 1868-1936, when Stanley bought 'em. They started making metal planes in 1934, also making them for the likes of GTL, Spear & Jackson and Talco. All of which have no frog adjustment screw, incidentally. It seems an awful lot of the metal plane models that appeared after WW2 can be traced back to the same handful of manufacturers, and one day I may even manage to work out all the links... (Hey, I'm still young enough - probably)

Any good? Well nobody'll believe me, but I don't have one and I've never used one. At least, the no-name #4 1/2 I have may be one, but I can't guarantee it. They can be made to work, but that "second quality" comment tells you all you need to know really. :( Still, for free, gratis and for nothing, who's complaining? :D

Cheers, Alf
 

Ham

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TX & Alf,
I've an Acorn #4, which I bought back in 1973 from a hardware shop in down town Fenny Stratford. It has a little sticky label on the rear handle which says that it is a Chapman plane made by Stanley. The word Stanley is written in an odd script that bears no resemblance to the usual Stanley logo, which has always made me assume that they didn't mean the real Stanley. It has been in irregular use for 31 years and seems, to me, to be well made; it has square cheeks (wings?) and a very slightly concave sole. The blade isn't wonderful and I've been thinking of replacing it with a Victor, after reading the GWW article recently.

David
 

tx2man

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Thanks Alf and all,
My neighbour has been round again.................. :wink:


The chisels are either Sorby or Marples except for one which
is a Stormont?
Saw is a S&J,
Don't know the saw set.

My good ol'Dad gave me the SB no.4 :D (i'm letting him have
the Acorn) :roll:

Also i went t'boot sale Sunday................... :wink:


All these for £3.00 :D :D :D

TX
 

Chris Knight

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TX,
That looks like a good haul!

You plainly have a nice bit of clean up to do but there will be some very useful/usable tools at the end of it. BTW I have a Stormont paring chisel and it is very good indeed.
 

Alf

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TX,

Phew. You've got a bit of rust removing to do on those clamp screws, but a nice score.
After all, (all together now) you can never have enough clamps! :D
I spy a paring chisel and a gouge amongst your neighbour's offerings - nice.
The saw looks in good nick too. I dunno, perhaps your dad got the better of the deal
having the Acorn rather than the SB4 though...

Stormont - George Stormont 1902-1950, then Archer Stormont from 1950-1973.
124 Fitzwilliam Street, Sheffield.

Cheers, Alf
 

tx2man

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Any amazing tips on the small :shock: matter of rust removal :?:

Not too sure what the condition of the saw will be after my first
setting,etc attempt will be :roll:

TX
 

Alf

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TX,

Might be a case for zapping, as Ian suggests. I'm a masochist and do all rust removal with elbow grease :roll: . The clamp threads are actually pretty easy if you use a coarse-ish abrasive such as maroon (all together now, folks) "Webrax" or equivalent and use a "shoe shine" technique. I do that for all my auger bits and it goes surprisingly quickly. Somewhere in the archives I bore at length on what I use (try a search for, guess what, "Webrax" and me as author in the hand tools board) To be honest I tend to avoid really rusty stuff like that these days - I just don't have enough hours in the day to clean it up. :(

Cheers, Alf
 

tx2man

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WOW Benchwayze :shock: :shock: :shock:

I admire someone who considers their reply before posting. :lol:
(check out the previous post date)

Cheers TX
 
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