Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

TGV garden gate

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

johnfarris

Established Member
Joined
18 Feb 2012
Messages
129
Reaction score
2
Location
In me garden shed
I am making a iroko garden gate using frame ledge and brace construction, I am at the point of attaching the TGV . I am not sure whether to plug and screw or nail. Do different timbers require different methods. If i screw it, how many screws horizontally do I use per board 123 x 19mm

Thanks in advance
 

ColeyS1

Established Member
Joined
2 Nov 2009
Messages
4,240
Reaction score
10
You'll always notice pellets but they do allow a decent stainless screw. Is the alternative to secret nail the tounges as you fix each board (allowing your expansion gap) or were you thinking of face nailing ?

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,775
Reaction score
568
Location
Pembrokeshire
A screw is the better fastener but as Coley said, not everyone likes the round plugs and they can stick out like a sore thumb. I personally like to use square, proud and chamfered pegs on stuff that needs to look good which needs to take a solid fixing. You would only need two screws per board on each fixing point about 20mm in on each edge of the board for a good solid fixing which will prevent the boards twisting. Also as Coley said, gives a good opportunity to use stainless steel fixings which while can be a pain to put into Iroko because it's so hard and tends to snap screws (Give a decent pilot hole first) it does mean you won't get any rust seepage down your boards in years to come.

Nails, especially the wire nails and brads tend to get pulled out by the timber over time if there isn't any glue or other bonding holding the timber down as well. For exterior stuff like gates, I really do prefer the old cut nails or roseheads as they look nicer and traditional as well as far great holding power in timber than wire nails. They are also much better at holding timber together if clinched over on the back and fed back into the work, you see many old ledge & brace doors done this way.
 
Top