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Lin

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Hope you guys don't mind a lady that is trying to learn how to make square things round. We purchased our lathe (jet 1442) several months ago....hubby's new toy but I have an interest in it also. The male gender (husband and son) have both tinkered with the "New Toy" a bit but haven't given it the time it deserves.....It sits there and calls to me....so I have been trying. I have found that I do not like the "Skew" and it does not like me either....I do ok roughing out a blank and using a spindle gouge....I'm getting better at sharpening....finally.....
I want to try to make a lidded box...any pointers?
Lin
 

CHJ

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Lin I am new to turning also, I found this book excellent on the basics of tool presentation and sharpening etc.

Woodturning, 'A foundation course' (NEW EDITION)
By KEITH ROWLEY

ISBN 1 86108 114 6


The examples projects were just what I needed to start practicing and saved me from many potential accidents I'm sure.

Worth a trawl of your local libraries or if all else fails look it up on AMAZON.
 

Les Mahon

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Lin,

I second Chas recomendation, in fact I treawled through here before buying my lathe last year and found lot's of recomendations for this book, and having bought it I was able to master some of the basics. My problem is like yours, my day job get's in the way of my woodworking, so I am still on the basics, but the book is excelent.

Les
 

Lin

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Thanks for the link....very interesting reading on the site. Now which to try????
Will check into the book at my library....cheaper that way..lol
I do have a couple books and videos on turning. Have managed to make a couple presentable items but have not done any hollowing out yet....and still have lots of issues using the skew. It works for me sometimes then the next time I try..I must get the angle wrong and catch the wood almost imediately. Haven't used a scraper yet..."So many toys....so little time"
This is a practice makes perfect type of tools and I know I need lots more practice on it. Making a pen or keychain or even a little top is something I have managed to do...even pulled off n "Insideout" ornament..well sorta...not the greatest looking one but I had a profile and was able to complete the turning after reversing the parts.
As an added note here....I'm a leftie...trying to learn to turn with both hands but tend to want to use my left more. This in itself I think is causing me problems with presenting the chisels properly....My other issue I have discovered....I'm only 5'3".....I've been standing on a 4" high block of wood to turn on this lathe....thinking I may need to got to 6" tall to get me where I need to be to do it right.
Lin
 

CHJ

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Lin":1siqwno8 said:
...snip.. My other issue I have discovered....I'm only 5'3".....I've been standing on a 4" high block of wood to turn on this lathe....thinking I may need to got to 6" tall to get me where I need to be to do it right.
Lin
Lin, If you can't re-site your lathe on a lower stand, (I assume the other half would be on their knees then) make sure you get yourself a long and wide enough Platform in order to reduce the risk of you tripping whilst approaching or stepping back from the lathe, standing on a small pedestal may be good for the ego but one little slip causing a hand contact with moving bits an pieces would not be nice.
 

Lin

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Already did the almost fall off the block thing (with the first piece of wood I tried to stand on) and now have a very large plank 4' long 12" wide and 4" thick...(it's a really nice chunk of cherry) that I slide under the lathe when not in use but after using it I believe I need to go taller. I will have to visit the lumber yard and purchase a 2"x6" and some thick ply to build a platform....nope can't lower the lathe....Hubby is 6'5" and son is 5'8" and the boy is just turned 13...I'm the shorty....lol I had to build a platform to use my bandsaw also.
Thank-you for the concern...
Lin
 

trevtheturner

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Lin,

I'm 6'5", too, so had to build a lathe bench to suit exactly my height! Don't know whether you are aware but the correct height of a lathe for any individual is: the axis between the lathe centres should be the same height as the height from the ground (or whatever you are standing on) to the point of you elbow when standing upright. It is advisable to get somebody else to measure you to get it right - try to do it yourself and it don't work, you can't help leaning over somewhat! This should help you arrive at the right height for your platform - before you go buying any more lovely slabs of cherry to stand on. :shock: A simple frame, topped with a board, as you mention, to exactly the height you need sounds the best answer. (Maybe your son should have a platform, too? Probably need to be a height-adjustable one for him. :roll: )

I don't think you should worry about being a 'leftie' - that should not have any bearing generally on the use of turning tools. You may just find one or two a little awkward on occasions, e.g. hollowing a bowl with a gouge, but even that may not be too bad if your lathe has a swivelling headstock. But, then, you may well find you do become ambidextrous with your turning tools - many turners do, for convenience, be they right- or left-handed.

The skew chisel is often found to be the most difficult tool to master, but once you have it will receive lots of use. Sharpening is also usually a bit of an issue when starting out. Once you have mastered it, either by reading up on it or having a demo. and then practising, you will find life becomes much easier. With a good sharpening jig exact, repeatable, sharpening quickly becomes second nature, so well worth trying to acquire one. That's far better than beating yourself up insisting you are going to learn to do it freehand - some can but some others never manage to. Do it the easy way and save your time for turning. :wink: You will also grind away far less of that expensive steel using a jig - just a couple of light touches on the wheel is often all that is required.

Once you have the correct working height and sharp tools you will soon develop your confidence and skills (we all get dig-ins when we start) and never look back - especially if you also have the benefit of Keith Rowley's book, the beginner's 'bible'. 'Pologies if I've rattled on about things you already know.

You mentioned in another thread that you are now addicted to scrolling. Be warned - turning can also be extremely addictive!! Can you manage two addictions? :lol: :lol:

Cheers,

Trev.
 

Lin

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Chas, New turner you say...I looked at your pics....If you are new to this I must have just been born.....gorgeous work. Hope I can get there someday.

Trev, Thanks for the info...BTW....I am hooked on scrolling but can't you tell the lathe is talking to me...I'm in here picking brains for some info...It is fun..even if I don't have anything but a pile of chips when done....lol

Hoping I can handle them both....My turning time will always be limited because I take orders for the scrollsaw...but I'll get there evenually. hopefully will someday be taking orders for the lathe also.....it needs to pay for itself...
Lin
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi Lin

I've found that a pallet (the kind that bricks arrive on :p ) provides a substantial wide base... having students of all sizes it's easy enough to put a couple of bearers eg 4x2 to raise to an comfortable height... I've added carpet tiles to mine... a little comfort goes a long way :D

To add a little to 6'5" 's height contribution (Hi Trev :p ) I'd suggest add a couple of inches to the elbow height for comfort... brings things a little closer to the eye :) ...trust you're wearing the necessaries 8)

Anyone wanting to post pix... Chas is away from his pc for a day or so... get in quick and surprise him!
 

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