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SIP 1486 12in bandsaw rip fence

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Croyboy

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I bought a second hand bandsaw and it has no rip fence. SIP no longer sell them as spares - anyone know of a suitable alternative - or have had a similar problem and built something?
Thanks
Patrick
 

beech1948

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Croyboy":4zhxi2xd said:
I bought a second hand bandsaw and it has no rip fence. SIP no longer sell them as spares - anyone know of a suitable alternative - or have had a similar problem and built something?
Thanks
Patrick
Just a couple of thoughts.
1) Other or more modern/older SIP bandsaws may use the same fence so check.
2) You could buy a Kreg fence and install costs about £110.....I use one and its very good.
3) Use a clamped block of wood across the saw adjust as needed
4) Make one from wood...possibly the cheapest and most satisfying

good luck
Al
 

Croyboy

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Thanks Al
I have spent this afternoon experimenting with wooden designs - still on the drawing board!
 

Fitzroy

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I bought an aftermarket fence 2nd hand and fitted it to my Startrite that was missing a fence. Was an easy job and great result.

Mine is a Kreg fence but was also considered an Axminster one.

Fitz.
 

Eric The Viking

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I have an old SIP (I think mine is slightly smaller - will have to check).

The supplied fence was really dreadful, and at one point I snapped off the locking lever, too. But although I mended it, I got rather fed up with fighting it every time I wanted to set it precisely.

I bought an aftermarket fence from Axminster, which has been a fiddle to fit, but works rather well. I note it's now about 80 quid more than when I bought (that is a HUGE price jump, Axminster!), but you might find it cheaper elsewhere (Chinese origin).

It is very versatile though, as the clamp basically has a pair of parallel sides with a locking bolt and Bristol lever through it. You can clamp anything to those surfaces, so you can in theory use smaller fences, etc. That said, the revised saw looks a bit weird as the fence is disproportionately huge, BUT it works very well indeed. My first experiment was cutting softwood "veneers" from gash 3x2 construction-grade offcuts. With a new Tuffsaws's blade I easily got a consistent 1.3mm (ish) "veneer" from a 9" length. I could probably have done better but hadn't finished the machine setup, nor was I using an ideal blade for the task.

Three words of caution:

1. You need to drill (and ideally to tap) the edge of the cast-iron table. I ignored some of the supplied fixings and went for M8 domed Allen bolts, which are strong enough and seem to work very well. The trouble is, however, that on my machine the table edges aren't finished very square to the table top (vertically, I mean), so some filing is necessary to get things to sit properly. This isn't difficult, but a bit daunting if you haven't done this sort of thing before.

I have yet to finish fitting the second rail, as the slope on that side is more awkward. That said, it works fine with just the main rail fitted (you don't usually put much sideways pressure on the fence in use).

2. The main rail ends up well below the plane of the table top. This would be fine, except that it fouls the lower door of the machine, so you either tilt the table or remove the rail for cleaning the machine after use. It's awkward but not impossible. The fence is sch an improvement I can live with the nuisance value.

3. The original rail clamped on underneath the table, to both sides of the blade-change slot, (four bolts altogether). This made the table rigid, and without the bracing effect the slot sides don't stay parallel (the table flexes). In use things get caught up on the sides of the slot - it's a right PITA.

To stop this happening, I've added my own brace underneath the table from 3/4" square-section steel tube, running the full width of the "front" of the table and using the original mounting holes from the old fence. Thus blade changing becomes rather "busy" - remove fence, remove brace, remove blade, Fit new blade, fit brace, fit fence... <sigh>.

I can see why professionals tend to have two bandsaws with different setups, as this dance takes at best 10-15 minutes with everything ready-to-go.

Hope that's helpful.

E.

PS: this aftermarket fence doesn't look half as good, as it has many significant differences - for example the fence extrusion fits over the sliding saddle, and doesn't clamp to the side of it - not as versatile.
 

Croyboy

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Thanks for the comprehensive reply Eric the Viking.
I am not an experienced carpenter or metal worker - l am a newbie woodturner who wants to cut his own bowl blanks.
I have today fashioned a wooden rip guard which I can clamp to the table.
It does the job but wins no design points!
I think l will stick with that for the time being.
I will not be using the saw much so don't want to spend any more - there does not appear to be anyone out there selling SIP genuine after market rip fences.
Thanks for the advice.
Patrick (still got 10 fingers)
 

SammyQ

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Eric, are you sure? My understanding is the you've shown two versions of the same thing. I have the second configuration and it's a capable big brute, locks down tight. In fact, I am going to try it on my Wadkin AGS, as the existing double-locking fence there can twist, just enough to be slightly dangerous. Please clarify, if you can.

Sam. Intrigued.
 

Steve Maskery

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It's unfortunate that if I tell you exactly how to solve your problem, I shall get my knuckles rapped for advertising, which is against forum rules. It is a great pity as I have an excellent and very affordable solution to your predicament. Heigh ho.
S
 

Fitzroy

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There’s this chap called Mr Maskery you should drop him a PM!

For a goodly while my band fence was a piece of oak finished straight and true, 3” x 3” which I clamped to the table front and back with record quick clamps. I’d set the table such that the front edge was perpendicular to the blade. That way I could use a try square off the front edge to set the fence aligned with the blade, clamp in place and away you go.

Fitz
 

Croyboy

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Thanks for that - l think when l am a bit more competent l will do as you suggest.
 

Eric The Viking

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SammyQ":p9livdpx said:
Eric, are you sure? My understanding is the you've shown two versions of the same thing. I have the second configuration and it's a capable big brute, locks down tight. In fact, I am going to try it on my Wadkin AGS, as the existing double-locking fence there can twist, just enough to be slightly dangerous. Please clarify, if you can.

Sam. Intrigued.
I think it is the same carriage/saddle, but the smaller one is machined differently, and at a guess the two bolts on top allow the fence to swivel to compensate for drift (you shouldn't need this much if the machine is carefully set up), Anyway you can, if you wish, do this on the rail and the running part of the carriage (the carriage has adjustable sliders as well as the roller bearings).

The bigger fence's carriage has two parallel faces either side, parallel to the fence, which in turn clamps on sideways (there's a heavy nut in a T-track on the fence itself). This is versatile and easily allows other fence designs to be attached. I've got some bits of old aluminium-framed double-glazing units, which are ideal for the purpose. The supplied fence will also swap through 90 degrees, so it can be a thin/flat fence, as well as a tall one. I have to say, on my little bandsaw, it takes up rather a lot of space when flat to the table!

Axminster seem to mess about with pricing quite a bit. There used to only be about 10 quid difference between them, and the taller one was far better value. But they have remaindered the tall one so I think they are stopping it. And honestly, the current price is rather excessive, IMHO.

Hope that makes sense. E.
 

Steve Maskery

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Eric The Viking":3s386zzz said:
the two bolts on top allow the fence to swivel to compensate for drift (you shouldn't need this much if the machine is carefully set up)
You should not need to do this AT ALL. The fence should be parallel to the mitre slots and the top wheel tracked until drift is ELIMINATED, not compensated for. That way, rips cuts are straight and crosscuts are too.
 

Eric The Viking

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Steve Maskery":2wdmo6rf said:
Eric The Viking":2wdmo6rf said:
the two bolts on top allow the fence to swivel to compensate for drift (you shouldn't need this much if the machine is carefully set up)
You should not need to do this AT ALL. The fence should be parallel to the mitre slots and the top wheel tracked until drift is ELIMINATED, not compensated for. That way, rips cuts are straight and crosscuts are too.
Sorry - I should have been more emphatic!
:) E.
 

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