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city17

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Hi all, I had this idea that it might be useful to have a specific "3D printing for woodworking" thread.

I noticed there are more and more woodworkers with a 3D printer nowadays, so having a place to find and share good designs specifically for woodworking might be helpful. Would be easier than searching through the countless designs on Thingiverse... Let me know what you think (or if I missed an existing thread like this).

To start off I'll share three designs I made recently, which are bench dogs, a planing stop, and a dust port adapter.

Bench Dog
Download STL file

More images of the Bench Dog.

This bench dog is a little different than ordinary ones, because it has a hole which fits M6 bolts. This allows you to mount anything with an M6 thread in your dog holes.
Atlas Bench Dog 4.jpg

Atlas Bench Dog 1.jpg

A good example of this is that you can use T-Track type clamps as a holdfast on your workbench. Currently if you want strong grip, you'll have to mount the bench dog from underneath the workbench, but maybe with a textured surface or if it were a little longer, it might also clamp with enough force from the top.

Atlas Bench Dog 3.jpg


The cap on these bench dogs is removable and you can use them in conjunction with the planing stop below. So they're a bit more multifunctional than regular bench dogs.

Planing Stop
Download STL files (includes bench dogs).

More images and a video of the planing stop.

This planing stop uses the same bench dogs as above. You can slide them left and right, so you can use the planing stop anywhere there are two dog holes near each other. One added benefit of a 3D printed planing stop is that you don't have to worry about damaging your plane or blade, which is a downside of a metal planing stop.

Atlas Planing Stop 6.jpg

Atlas Planing Stop 7.jpg

If you'd like to make it longer or shorter, you can just scale it length-wise in your slicing software.

Dust Port Adapter for Makita Vacuum to Elektra Beckum HC260
Download link for the dust port adapter.


The last one is a little more specific, but maybe there are people here with the same setup. It's a dust port adapter for the Makita VC2512L vacuum to the Elektra Beckum HC 260 planer thicknesser.

It might actually fit some other machines as well, but that would be a bit of a coincidence. I've added a STEP file as well so you can adjust the inner/outer dimensions of both sides of the adapter. Using a normal vacuum with a planer thicknesser isn't ideal, but works reasonably well for smaller boards.

Dust Adapter Makita Elektra Beckum 2.jpg

Dust Adapter Makita Elektra Beckum 1.jpg
 

city17

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A friend of mine likes to build small sailing boats, and asked me to design a 3D printed spar gauge for him. A spar gauge is used for marking square stock so that you can plane it into an exactly 8-sided beam, which is the basis for a round mast.

I added a center hole so you can also use it as a center marking tool. Because it's 3D printed, the dimensions are very accurate, which is a bit more tricky with DIY wooden spar gauges, especially if you don't own a drill press.
Spar Gauge 11.jpg
 

Stanleymonkey

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I've never heard of a spar gauge - clever little piece of kit.

The bench dog that fits a bolt looks like a great idea - I think you 'll be printing those for years to come.

Great thread idea - thanks for starting it,
 

Roberto Flintofski

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Hi all, I had this idea that it might be useful to have a specific "3D printing for woodworking" thread.

I noticed there are more and more woodworkers with a 3D printer nowadays, so having a place to find and share good designs specifically for woodworking might be helpful. Would be easier than searching through the countless designs on Thingiverse... Let me know what you think (or if I missed an existing thread like this).

To start off I'll share three designs I made recently, which are bench dogs, a planing stop, and a dust port adapter.

Bench Dog
Download STL file

More images of the Bench Dog.

This bench dog is a little different than ordinary ones, because it has a hole which fits M6 bolts. This allows you to mount anything with an M6 thread in your dog holes.
View attachment 101073
View attachment 101077
A good example of this is that you can use T-Track type clamps as a holdfast on your workbench. Currently if you want strong grip, you'll have to mount the bench dog from underneath the workbench, but maybe with a textured surface or if it were a little longer, it might also clamp with enough force from the top.

View attachment 101074

The cap on these bench dogs is removable and you can use them in conjunction with the planing stop below. So they're a bit more multifunctional than regular bench dogs.

Planing Stop
Download STL files (includes bench dogs).

More images and a video of the planing stop.

This planing stop uses the same bench dogs as above. You can slide them left and right, so you can use the planing stop anywhere there are two dog holes near each other. One added benefit of a 3D printed planing stop is that you don't have to worry about damaging your plane or blade, which is a downside of a metal planing stop.

View attachment 101075
View attachment 101076
If you'd like to make it longer or shorter, you can just scale it length-wise in your slicing software.

Dust Port Adapter for Makita Vacuum to Elektra Beckum HC260
Download link for the dust port adapter.


The last one is a little more specific, but maybe there are people here with the same setup. It's a dust port adapter for the Makita VC2512L vacuum to the Elektra Beckum HC 260 planer thicknesser.

It might actually fit some other machines as well, but that would be a bit of a coincidence. I've added a STEP file as well so you can adjust the inner/outer dimensions of both sides of the adapter. Using a normal vacuum with a planer thicknesser isn't ideal, but works reasonably well for smaller boards.

View attachment 101078
View attachment 101079

What 3d printer model do you have?????
 

robgul

Barry Bucknell is my hero
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Dogs look useful - especially the bolt and clamping idea . . . . I've sent the file to my 3d printing supplier (a.k.a. my brother (y))
 

robgul

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Dogs look useful - especially the bolt and clamping idea . . . . I've sent the file to my 3d printing supplier (a.k.a. my brother (y))
My "supplier" has already made a prototype to check on my bench! - it's winging its way to me in the mail.
 

robgul

Barry Bucknell is my hero
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Hi all, I had this idea that it might be useful to have a specific "3D printing for woodworking" thread.

I noticed there are more and more woodworkers with a 3D printer nowadays, so having a place to find and share good designs specifically for woodworking might be helpful. Would be easier than searching through the countless designs on Thingiverse... Let me know what you think (or if I missed an existing thread like this).

To start off I'll share three designs I made recently, which are bench dogs, a planing stop, and a dust port adapter.

Bench Dog
Download STL file

More images of the Bench Dog.

This bench dog is a little different than ordinary ones, because it has a hole which fits M6 bolts. This allows you to mount anything with an M6 thread in your dog holes.
View attachment 101073
View attachment 101077
A good example of this is that you can use T-Track type clamps as a holdfast on your workbench. Currently if you want strong grip, you'll have to mount the bench dog from underneath the workbench, but maybe with a textured surface or if it were a little longer, it might also clamp with enough force from the top.

View attachment 101074

The cap on these bench dogs is removable and you can use them in conjunction with the planing stop below. So they're a bit more multifunctional than regular bench dogs.

Planing Stop
Download STL files (includes bench dogs).

More images and a video of the planing stop.

This planing stop uses the same bench dogs as above. You can slide them left and right, so you can use the planing stop anywhere there are two dog holes near each other. One added benefit of a 3D printed planing stop is that you don't have to worry about damaging your plane or blade, which is a downside of a metal planing stop.



If you'd like to make it longer or shorter, you can just scale it length-wise in your slicing software.

Dust Port Adapter for Makita Vacuum to Elektra Beckum HC260
Download link for the dust port adapter.


The last one is a little more specific, but maybe there are people here with the same setup. It's a dust port adapter for the Makita VC2512L vacuum to the Elektra Beckum HC 260 planer thicknesser.

It might actually fit some other machines as well, but that would be a bit of a coincidence. I've added a STEP file as well so you can adjust the inner/outer dimensions of both sides of the adapter. Using a normal vacuum with a planer thicknesser isn't ideal, but works reasonably well for smaller boards.
We've got the bench dog file but can't seem to find the square sliding cap - is it there, or is it us??
 

city17

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We've got the bench dog file but can't seem to find the square sliding cap - is it there, or is it us??
You're right, I forgot to add the cap. I've updated the ZIP file to include the sliding caps (both 20mm and 19mm version. You can download it here.

Are you using 19 or 20 mm dog holes? Curious how they will fit, because I only have 19 mm (3/4" exactly) holes, so I haven't tested them physically with 20 mm holes yet.
 

robgul

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You're right, I forgot to add the cap. I've updated the ZIP file to include the sliding caps (both 20mm and 19mm version. You can download it here.

Are you using 19 or 20 mm dog holes? Curious how they will fit, because I only have 19 mm (3/4" exactly) holes, so I haven't tested them physically with 20 mm holes yet.
Ah - I'll download the file - thanks. My MFT has 20mm holes but the first prototype is coming up oversized at about 21+mm - he's going to tinker with it - he's 100 miles away so there's a postal delay! I'll report back.
 

Cooper

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Because it's 3D printed, the dimensions are very accurate
I don't have a 3D printer but before I retired I got one for school. One of the kids decided they wanted to make something that would fit onto Lego Technique, he had. We measured the Lego really carefully and drew the piece exactly but the piece contracted quite dramatically as it cooled so there was nothing like a fit. Sadly there wasn't time for him to redo the work. Yesterday's thread about Contraction rules brought it to mind. Does you 3 D printer software take contraction into account?
 

robgul

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Ah - I'll download the file - thanks. My MFT has 20mm holes but the first prototype is coming up oversized at about 21+mm - he's going to tinker with it - he's 100 miles away so there's a postal delay! I'll report back.
Are you sure the download link is the correct file - it doesn't appear to have the cap file added to the .zip
 

city17

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Are you sure the download link is the correct file - it doesn't appear to have the cap file added to the .zip
Think there was a small technical problem which caused it not to be updated for everyone... I think it should be fixed now. If it's still not working, if you give your email in a PM then I can send the file to you directly.

I don't have a 3D printer but before I retired I got one for school. One of the kids decided they wanted to make something that would fit onto Lego Technique, he had. We measured the Lego really carefully and drew the piece exactly but the piece contracted quite dramatically as it cooled so there was nothing like a fit. Sadly there wasn't time for him to redo the work. Yesterday's thread about Contraction rules brought it to mind. Does you 3 D printer software take contraction into account?
Good point. It depends on the material used and the printer itself. I think if you use PLA and have a well-calibrated printer it's generally within the tolerances required for woodworking. But a poorly calibrated printer or a heavily contracting material can make the dimensions quite a way off indeed.

Usually when you get a new 3D printer it's a good idea to print a standard sized cube, then measure the actual dimensions, and change the printer settings if corrections are needed.
 

LBCarpentry

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They are all fantastic! What’s the red box thing? Was that entire piece 3D printed?

Exactly what I want a 3D printer for - life’s little hacks. I’m pretty comfortable with google sketch up. How easy is fusion to learn? Is much the same thing if your used to working and editing polygons etc?

Louis
 

city17

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They are all fantastic! What’s the red box thing? Was that entire piece 3D printed?

Exactly what I want a 3D printer for - life’s little hacks. I’m pretty comfortable with google sketch up. How easy is fusion to learn? Is much the same thing if your used to working and editing polygons etc?

Louis
I'd say Fusion is just as easy to learn as Sketch Up, but it has quite a different design philosophy (or rather SketchUp has a different approach than most CAD programs). So it's not 1:1 transferrable, but having used Sketchup probably still helps.

But I think you can also export STL files (the ones needed for 3D printing) from SketchUp, so you probably could just use that!
 
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