Reccomend me a whetstone/sharpening setup under £50

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sams93

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I am looking for a cheap-ish sharpening setup for my planes and chisels. I was planning to buy the Axi Honing Guide (Link) and then a whetstone, just trying to decide what one.

I looked at the axminster sharpening set, Link to Kit, but this seems to be mostly for knives.

I would be really grateful if anyone could reccomend something suitable!

Thanks
 
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Have you read the details; "The Kit is designed primarily for sharpening cook’s/chef’s kitchen knives"
 
Have you read the details; "The Kit is designed primarily for sharpening cook’s/chef’s kitchen knives"
Yes thats what concerned me, I am not sure it would be ideal for what I want it for, I am hoping someone will have some reccomendations of something more suitable.
 
Although a considerable higher amount to spend the veritas deluxe honing kit covers just about every angle I need ( some people f which I’ll probably never use but they are there should the need for them arise. It can be used with any type of stone be it water or oil or diamond. Available in different options it’s the best I’ve had and has transformed my sharpening skills as I’ve never had any formal training in woodworking or sharpening. Imo
Worth the money as plane irons and chisels are all catered for .

Veritas Mk.II Deluxe Honing Guide - Classic Hand Tools Limited
 
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Although a considerable higher amount to spend the veritas deluxe honing kit covers just about every angle I need ( some people f which I’ll probably never use but they are there should the need for them arise. It can be used with any type of stone be it water or oil or diamond. Available in different options it’s the best I’ve had and has transformed my sharpening skills as I’ve never had any formal training in woodworking or sharpening. Imo
Worth the money as plane irons and chisels are all catered for .

Veritas Mk.II Deluxe Honing Guide - Classic Hand Tools Limited
How does that differ from this (which is in my price range)


https://www.axminstertools.com/veri...0810?queryID=30d1b1e6b8a44d1d39b9da7655c24068
 
If you want to go down the easy traditional route Norton IB8 is a basic combination stone for nearly all purposes, plus 3in1 oil.
Then when you have got the hang of it one more finer stone is all you'll ever need. No jigs or anything. Just make a box with lid for the stones.
 
Because there is no measuring involved - you set the registration plate to the angle reqd , set the appropriate setting on the guide and you’re off. The registration plate sets the chisel or iron square , covers all angles and back bevels and micro bevels with one set up - ideal for my brain as it’s pretty foolproof.
 
Because there is no measuring involved - you set the registration plate to the angle reqd , set the appropriate setting on the guide and you’re off. The registration plate sets the chisel or iron square , covers all angles and back bevels and micro bevels with one set up - ideal for my brain as it’s pretty foolproof.
No measuring involved if you don't use a jig either, though a novice might need to practice hitting close to the magic angle of 30º. Half an hour or so.
 
No measuring involved if you don't use a jig either, though a novice might need to practice hitting close to the magic angle of 30º. Half an hour or so.
Each to their own- I’ve never been consistent sharpening by hand -using a jig - this one or any similar gives me the confidence that my tools are sharp and at the correct bevel for the type of work I’m doing . Changing the subject - many years ago if I wanted to join a length copper pipe to a lead pipe I would do a wiped lead joint but nowadays I use a lead loc- different technique but same result only quicker.
 
Yes, this is one of those things that people can get passionate about, my way is the right way and all that.

Truth be told most of it is knack. The most useful thing about spending the money is it provides the impetus to look into technique and invest the time to pick up the knack.

I actually use both Western and Japanese stones for sharpening but I keep them segregated - the Japanese waterstones for chisels and planes and Western oilstones for knives. There's no master plan to that particular arrangement but the segregation is simply for chisels and planes you want flat surfaces to grind on. Knife blades generally need a little more "artistry" and can either tolerate or even benefit from a more rounded surface. People may chip in here and point out the waterstones wear more quickly than the oilstones, and you know what, they're right - I did say it wasn't a master plan.

However the cheapest "full range" set of waterstones from the Amazon is £28 - I bought something almost identical a few years back and yes they're great. Add perhaps £7-8 for a nagura stone for the finer grades (yes, you do need one for waterstones), a tenner or so for an Eclipse style honing guide and we're beginning to approach that budget cap. We've not discussed levelling stones or stropping yet.

If it was me I'd probably opt for a dual grit oilstone of the type sold by Draper, Stanley etc on the understanding that the usual 400/1000 grit combo is in my opinion a bit coarse, 1000 grit is a bit low for a final grind and 400 is more for reshaping than resharpening a blade. If you can find e.g. 1000/3000 I'd take that but I suspect you'll struggle.

You can still make such a stone work, you just have more to do with the strop. Again speaking purely for myself I'd opt for a loose sheet leather type and glue it to a piece of flat scrap yourself - PVA is fine. The ones mounted to a handle seem needlessly expensive and also miss the point you're going to use it on the flat anyway. Get a big bar of green polishing compound - those 500g bars Amazon sell will last a lifetime - and away you go. The only "secret" I would share is a few drops of oil applied to the strop before the compound soften the latter up and help it bond while the strop is new - strops improve with a bit of wear and you won't need it after a while.
 
Sorry cannot help you there,
I was looking at some cheap nickle plated hones on the bay, and it does seem D_W was onto something...
As in, the only ones making them half decently must be only coming from a single place.
This being likely the same place which makes the thin card ones.

He mentioned of lots of grit shearing off or something to that effect on cheaper ones before.

I can't see a clear enough picture, (actually multiple) to actually see if they are as bad as they look,
or if there is better to be had for the same dough.
Screenshot-2023-1-4 PROFESSIONAL Coarse Diamond Sharpening Stone Knife Blade Whetstone Honing ...png




So I thought I'd have a look at ITS /Vaunt/Ultex hones to see if they were having what used to
be a bi-annular sale with 50% off. (Not sure if they do this anymore?)
I'd hate to have to deal with an underside of a hone personally.
Screenshot-2023-1-4 Vaunt Diamond Sharpening Stone Single-Sided 200mm x 75mm Coarse.png



So looked at the Faithfull, thinking these could be gotten in another grit, perhaps cheaper,
seems not, but haven't searched, (the three packs have plastic bases it seems)
Screenshot-2023-1-4 HFS(R) 203mm x 70mm Diamond Sharpening Stone Diamond Hone Sharpening Plate...png




I was hoping to give you an @smartarseanswer, and find you two hones for 20something, and suggest you go out and look for a used grinder for about the same.

If you do happen on a nice grinder, and are skint....
then thin cards can still be bought for very little, and bond nicely to stone,
and I suppose some autosol might do the rest, or until perhaps you chance upon a washita, black or trans ark, or other English hones which has been lying around for 50 years covered in muck,
in car boots or ebay.

Some of those cards are super aggressive, like 150 grit, which Ed65 used to tout as being enough to get by without a grinder.

Any cheap ol Eclipse knockoff will do, you might ditch it after a while.

If someone has other suggestions of some hones which are bonded to the nickle plate,
and cheaper than both of the better quality cheapies, I'm sure it would be appreciated by many newcomers.


Tom
 
I'm in the oilstone basic Jacob school of sharpening but do occasionally take out a jig to re-angle a blade from time to time. I was gifted a Veritas guide a few years after someone saw me using the Stanley Correct Honing guide I inherited from my late big brother. I still prefer it over the Veritas guide for its speed and could well understand any newcomer would find it easier too as long as you only want 25 or 30-degree angles. Cheap used too.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/36409567.../4gUgu+gdSD7WzVpKSLguO+bA=|tkp:Bk9SR6Sd0eWvYQ
 
No place for 3 in 1 where wood is concerned. Spills, splashes and timber is fubar.
You don't put it on the wood you put it on the oil stone. Absolutely no problem and never has been. Thin oils of various sorts have been in use for generations.
You wipe if off the blade before you use it.
Wouldn't do any harm anyway as any accidental transfer would be planed off with the next stroke
 
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I use three Vaunt diamond stones (300, 600 and 1200 grit) together with a leather strop glued to a piece of ply (same size as the Vaunts) all set in a piece of 18mm thick ply. I made this after watching Paul Sellers make one. It is very useful for quick honing on each stone with a squirt of glass cleaner and 30 quick strokes on the strop with autosol. I also like and use oil stones when I have a bit more time and want to do a more refined hone. As Jacob says, a wipe with a dry rag removes any Windex, oil or autosol..
 
Hi i can help you out with a combi stone and box for a decent price as ive a "surplus" then get a guide jobbie for £10 or less
Hi - so what would I need, just a honing guide?

Veritas do this one but it is significantly more than the £14 basic axi one, I don't mind buying the veritas one if it's going to be much better, but if the basic axi one works fine then I would be able to live with that!

I know that a lot of people are searching for the 'perfect edge' but I really am just looking to do some basic sharpening of my planes and chisels, nothing fancy.
 
Hi - so what would I need, just a honing guide?

Veritas do this one but it is significantly more than the £14 basic axi one, I don't mind buying the veritas one if it's going to be much better, but if the basic axi one works fine then I would be able to live with that!

I know that a lot of people are searching for the 'perfect edge' but I really am just looking to do some basic sharpening of my planes and chisels, nothing fancy.
This one will do to check angle is correct! ive just been doing free hand using both oil stones and diamond ones.
Ive always been told getting the sharp edge rather than worry if spot on angle with planes.
Did sharpen my Millers Falls 14(No5)other week free hand and like a white hot knife through melted butter! so if i can do i'm sure you can!
Not sure where you are in UK but Most Men sheds have grinders etc to get blades started off if blunter than the pointed end of a jumbo jet!
And people often that know how to get it right so your in right direction?
Then you can always finish off with oil stone then Strop it.
Have you got a Strop? Can get on ebay etc go with the biggest you can find that way you can get a good drag on it a strop smooth's ground edge so cuts better.
You can lube stone with Honing oil and others and you can get a litre of honing oil or a 3in1 type for £8 odd on ebay or Camellia oil CZ Tzacks was selling on there ebay site other week for £20 odd for two 250ml bottles good to wipe tools over also

but this looks good to check angles are right Veritas Bevel Gauge

But best is little and often instead of little and late as that's when you need more work on edge.

The basic one works for many you posted.
One thing I've often used when making sure have an edge is wiping over with a permanent marker pen like we do with Engineers blue when grinding in valves etc that way you can see if even.
 
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