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Question for the domino users

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munkypuzel

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Hi all,

Just purchased a domino (xmas pressie for myself), and after a few try outs i have completed my first job. A small half gaurd rail for a kids bed out if oak. This involved making 14 joints to connect top and bottom rail to 7 'slats'.

When cutting a hole with the domino, the no.5 bit snapped about 5mm from the tip. On inspection there was a very small knot next to the slot. My questions for those experienced with these machines are:

Should i avoid knots completely and at all costs?
Did i push too hard?
Is this a common occurance or was i just unlucky?

Any other advice would be welcome,

Many thanks
Mark
 

Chrispy

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One small knot should not be a problem! Take it back and complain.
 

olivetree

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I used to work for festool and its not some thing that i can remember coming across very often, i would take the cutter back and try and get it replaced, it should be able to cut through knots.
 

Chems

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Plunged to fast, its tempting to do but a nice slow cut will feel better. I find with my domino to get it to plunge initially (get it going like) there is a little bit more resistance and this can sometimes lead to me forcing it in to quickly do you get the same?
 

woodbloke

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Chems":uwpma1j1 said:
Plunged to fast, its tempting to do but a nice slow cut will feel better. I find with my domino to get it to plunge initially (get it going like) there is a little bit more resistance and this can sometimes lead to me forcing it in to quickly do you get the same?
I'm now a Domino user and I suspect Chems is correct. A slow steady feed into the material is far better than a rapid push, as you might do with a biscuit jointer - Rob
 

woodbloke

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Chems":3c8k2w7q said:
Plunged to fast, its tempting to do but a nice slow cut will feel better. I find with my domino to get it to plunge initially (get it going like) there is a little bit more resistance and this can sometimes lead to me forcing it in to quickly do you get the same?
I'm now a Domino user and I suspect Chems is correct. A slow steady feed into the material is far better than a rapid push, as you might do with a biscuit jointer - Rob
 

ProShop

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I suspect your plunging to fast as Chems suggests , try to imaging what's happening when the bit enters the wood, its swinging from side to side as it rotates, it hits the softer wood on one side of the slot and all of a sudden it hits a brick wall (very hard knot) on the other side. 5mm bit stands not much of a chance really. Plunge slower and you'll save wear n tear on the bit and the slot will be much cleaner.

Just a point, you are dust extracting when you use it aren't you........... :D as that makes a big difference.
 

promhandicam

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I suspect that the cutter could be defective. The reason being that I have put a 5mm domino slot into the side of a hardened screw - it knackered the bit bit it didn't snap. Take the bit back to your festool supplier and explain what happened.
 

Doug B

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Hi Mark.

I had exactly the same thing happen, it was the bit supplied with the machine & it broke as you described on only it`s second project, fortunately I had a spare 5mm bit in the accessories systainer.
Definitely nothing to do with plunging too quick as mine broke when cutting slots for glazing bars & i was taking it very steady.
As has been said, take it back, depends on how many & what you are cutting slots in, but on the whole the bits do last quite a long time.

Cheers.
 

munkypuzel

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Hi All, and thanks very much for your replys.

I guess I may have pushed slightly hard, will definitely take greater care in the future. I had not thought too much about the swinging and driving action of the bit and the stresses it would be under as was too eager just to use it!!

Interestingly it was also the bit that came with the machine that broke, and I too had the spares that came in the full pack,

Thanks again :)
Mark
 

Benchwayze

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Hmmm! I was considering a Domino, (If you can still buy the original model.) but maybe I should merely upgrade to a Lamello? :wink:

There's nothing functionally wrong with my Elu, except it's a 'swinging' body type. On thinner boards it can be a bit hairy when it kicks.

John :)
 

Paul Chapman

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Benchwayze":1o3cv7lx said:
On thinner boards it can be a bit hairy when it kicks.
John, if you are having problems with it "kicking" as you plunge the blade (more likely with harder woods and possibly if your blade is a bit blunt), try not plunging the blade in one go but use two or three shorter plunges. That way you can eliminate any "kicking".

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 

Benchwayze

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Paul Chapman":2c3l6x7j said:
Benchwayze":2c3l6x7j said:
On thinner boards it can be a bit hairy when it kicks.
John, if you are having problems with it "kicking" as you plunge the blade (more likely with harder woods and possibly if your blade is a bit blunt), try not plunging the blade in one go but use two or three shorter plunges. That way you can eliminate any "kicking".

Cheers :wink:

Paul
You are right of course Paul, and I have been 'putting off' the purchase of a new blade for some time.
It's no real problem, and I have also worked out a way of using the thing on the benchtop more than I did previously.
But yes, a new blade is in order. Until I get one, I will use the slot biscuit cutter I bought for my router!

Cheers and a Happy Gnu Year!

John :D
 

yetloh

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Benchwayze":b8chzxhj said:
Hmmm! I was considering a Domino, (If you can still buy the original model.) but maybe I should merely upgrade to a Lamello? :wink:

John :)
You can certainly still buy the original. I am just making friends with mine using the the smallest (4mm) cutter. It'll do things you could never do with a Lamello. I do agree that slow and steady is definitely the way to go, especially with the smaller cutters.

Jim
 

Benchwayze

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Have to admit, a Domino is a 'want' rather than a need for me. I am somewhat attached to slip-tenons, which is virtually what a Domino joint is I suppose. I cut those with my router and up-cut spiral bits of required sizes.

One day I might progress!
Thanks Jim

Regards
John :)
 

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