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piece of wood gets convex while planing, how to solve?

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ali27

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I hadn't used my planes for a while now. Today I sharpened
the plane blade of my no4. In the past I would slightly feather
the edges on the polishing stone, but this time I did not do this.

So I took 50-100 shavings on a piece of maple, 1.5 inches wide
and about 50 inches long. I noticed I could not get full width shaving
and the plane seemed to cut most of the time in the middle.
After a while I saw one side being noticeably higher than the other side.
I tried correcting this, but then noticed I had created clear convexity in the
width, all 50 inches of the wood.

I really am a novice in using planes, so I tried using my no6 to correct
this convexity, but that too did not work. The only thing I can think
of is using a block plane, ''planing in the width'', to get rid of the high middle.

So what caused this convexity? Was it because I did not feather/camber the
plane blade slightly? I never had this problem before.

Thanks.

ali
 

matthewwh

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Hi Ali,

It is the combined effect of all the inaccuracies in the strokes, holding the plane absolutely 100% perfectly level and true is humanly impossible.

A bit of camber will help to counteract it, as will regular checking with a square at points along the edge so you can drift left or right to remove any high spots.
 

Jacob

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Yes you just have to keep watching and correcting your progress and not assume that the plane, or some magic technique, will do it for you.
Waste a lot of wood - practice practice - preferably on some scrap.
 

Paul Chapman

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It also helps to scribble on the work with a soft pencil so that you can see what you are taking off.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 

ali27

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Thanks for the replies guys. So how do I take away
this convexity? I was thinking of using a block plane
or maybe even a scrub plane? I don't have a scrub
plane, but AFAIK it's just a plane with a blade that has
a big camber on it.

Might even try my little router plane to get rid of the middle
bump.

Ali
 

Jacob

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Certainly not a block plane or scrub plane.
Just keep going with your 4 until you've got it right - keep looking at how it's going - it's not a machine. And adjust your action accordingly e.g. press down on the nose if you want it to cut more and vice versa.
 

ali27

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Jacob":2zl7v5nv said:
Certainly not a block plane or scrub plane.
Just keep going with your 4 until you've got it right - keep looking at how it's going - it's not a machine. And adjust your action accordingly e.g. press down on the nose if you want it to cut more and vice versa.
Jacob, but the bump makes the plane rock a tiny bit, so it's impossible
to remove the bump that way. What do you suggest, planing diagonally?

Ali
 

JohnCee

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Just to clarify, you mean convex across the width, not along the length?

If so there's something wrong with your plane or the way you have it sharpened/set up.
A couple of passes with the plane should get it flat across the width, and it should take full width shavings, even if the edge isn't true/square along the whole length.
 

Jacob

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ali27":8l4wc07w said:
Jacob":8l4wc07w said:
Certainly not a block plane or scrub plane.
Just keep going with your 4 until you've got it right - keep looking at how it's going - it's not a machine. And adjust your action accordingly e.g. press down on the nose if you want it to cut more and vice versa.
Jacob, but the bump makes the plane rock a tiny bit, so it's impossible
to remove the bump that way. What do you suggest, planing diagonally?

Ali
Plane to remove the bump. Sounds stupid - but you just have to work it out. See it as a challenge. It is a challenge! Look at it, think about it.
Doing what Paul said could help - scribble all over it with a pencil then you can see where you have been cutting. Also watch the shaving as it comes up through the mouth. NB don't have the mouth set close - you need the frog to be dead in line with the back of the mouth. Also - if the plane is actually cutting don't start fiddling with alternative planes - you can do it with a no4 and you really need to get to grips with one plane before you go on to others.
 

ali27

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Guys again thanks for the replies, much appreciated.

I used a block plane and no4 going diagonally to remove
the bump in the middle. Checked it with a square and it
was flat. Took my no4 for about 20 passes and then the no6
the same without getting full width shavings. Checked the surface
again, and unfortunately again I got a high middle and low sides al along
the length. After a little thinking I decided to check the sole. Bingo! The sole
is convex in the width(both the no4 and 6), so it's rocking on the wood.
Flattening the sole with sandpaper has caused this.

I am going the file away the high spots on the sole and perhaps just
file or scrape the whole sole flat. The toe, front of the mouth and
heel need to be coplanar as far as I know, so I am going to
concentrate on that first.

Ali
 

Jacob

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It's not the plane it's how you use it. Stop fiddling with planes and concentrate on planing!
 

deserter

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For once Jacob I have to agree with you. Sorry but there is no point fettling a plane until you know how to use it properly, sounds like your exerting pressure at the wrong ends when starting and finishing a cut to me.
 

ali27

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Jacob":2qhjbfy1 said:
It's not the plane it's how you use it. Stop fiddling with planes and concentrate on planing!
Well I used to get full width shavings with the same plane doing
the same thing. Nothing has changed except me using sandpaper
to get a flatter sole. This has created convexity in the width of the
plane which makes it rock sideways.

Ali
 

JohnCee

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Totally disagree, Jacob. I'm not one for fettling planes to death, but if the basic set-up/adjustment is out, you can plane from now till Christmas and not achieve the desired result.
Planing is, or should be, easy. Most of the skill is in setting up the plane.
 

Pete Maddex

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Hi, ali27

When you flatened the sole did you stick the abrasive down? if you didn't it will cause the ripple in the abrasive take more off the ends/sides.

This is my setup 6mm glass on a flat binch top and the abrasive clamped and stretched tight.



I use it to flatten all my planes.

Pete
 

promhandicam

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If the plane was working ok, why did you feel the need to pipper around with it? I've inherited a couple of old planes which work fine and I have never felt the need to take a straight edge or square to any of them. The old addage, if it ain't broke don't fix it springs to mind.
 

David C

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Ali,
I think you need a comprehensive and complete guide to planing a piece of timber. This is no mean undertaking and without some consistent advice you are likely to struggle for a long time.

Best wishes,
David Charlesworth
 

GazPal

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Hi Ali, If you don't have someone nearby who's capable of showing you how to best hand plane timber to dimensions and finish, the next best step is to source information elsewhere and invest in something like David's DVD's which cover hand planing techniques and set-up.

In terms of fettling hand planes (Hand tools in general) it's typically best to wait until you know something of the expected performance achievable from each plane BEFORE attempting to fix something that may or may not need fixing. Firstly learn to sharpen the blade/iron and then adjust the tool to match your end goal and technique. :wink:
 

Jacob

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JohnCee":iwz7y4pi said:
Totally disagree, Jacob. I'm not one for fettling planes to death, but if the basic set-up/adjustment is out, you can plane from now till Christmas and not achieve the desired result.
Planing is, or should be, easy. Most of the skill is in setting up the plane.
By not fiddling I meant not to lap, file, sand, grind, modify, buy new bits, fettle , polish etc.
But yes to attend to basic set up and adjustment. If you are a beginner you don't know whether it's the plane at fault or just the set up. That's why I think you just have to get stuck in, starting with sharpening and different adjustments, which cost nothing and you have to get to grips with anyway.
If the blade is sharp and the plane is adjustable it should be just about possible to plane with it however rubbish it is overall.
You've got to learn by starting with the obvious things.
A bit extreme as a comparison but if you can't drive a car (assuming it starts OK) then tuning the engine probably won't help but putting a bit of time in just driving it, will.
 
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