Peacock Oil

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woodbloke66

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Speaking to Matt P at Workshop Heaven the other day, he was pretty enthusiastic about Peacock Oil. I know it's pretty expensive stuff, but has anybody used it? I'm tempted to try it out if there are any really good recommendations - Rob
 
How many peacocks are processed for an average sized bottle?

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sammy.se":dkptn5ed said:
How many peacocks are processed for an average sized bottle?

It takes on average 2.2 full sized male peacocks to fill a single 250ml bottle, it takes about 3.4 full sized females as they aren't quite as potent. Once the peacock is "dealt with" it is put into a press, feathers and all, in which EXACTLY 19 1/2 tonnes of pressure liquidises the peacock into its raw puree form. This raw peacock puree is then processed further by cooling the oil to below freezing until the purer peacock puree and the "sludge" separate. The purer peacock puree is then heated to 695 degrees Celsius until it produces the peacock vapour, which is then distilled into raw peacock oil. The oil is then completed by adding diamond and gold dust to the mix and then putting it into fancy bottles.

£25 a 250ml bottle please :D
 
The same quantity of Liberon Fnishing oil would cost £1.91 if bought in 5 ltr tins, as I do. Given that much oil is simply wasted to the cloth when oiling, that would be an astronomically expensive product to use.

I must admit I’m curious to see what it finishes like but I’m stuffed if I’d pay 13 times over an above the cost of what of what I already consder to be an excellent product.
 
Trevanion":15yjsqm9 said:
sammy.se":15yjsqm9 said:
How many peacocks are processed for an average sized bottle?

It takes on average 2.2 full sized male peacocks to fill a single 250ml bottle, it takes about 3.4 full sized females as they aren't quite as potent. Once the peacock is "dealt with" it is put into a press, feathers and all, in which EXACTLY 19 1/2 tonnes of pressure liquidises the peacock into its raw puree form. This raw peacock puree is then processed further by cooling the oil to below freezing until the purer peacock puree and the "sludge" separate. The purer peacock puree is then heated to 695 degrees Celsius until it produces the peacock vapour, which is then distilled into raw peacock oil. The oil is then completed by adding diamond and gold dust to the mix and then putting it into fancy bottles.

£25 a 250ml bottle please :D
Thanks. Might have a go at making it myself. Not many peacocks where I am. Will try using locally available birds (pigeons) and see how it goes

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Suddenly my bottle of camelia oil finally looks like a bargain! :roll: :shock:
 
Thanks chaps, lots of encouraging replies :lol: :lol: but it would appear that nobody has girded loins, taken a deep breath, hit 'submit' on the 'pooter and actually tried the stuff. Too late now, 'cos I ordered some last night :D - Rob
 
I have 25ml bottles of snake oil and am prepared to offer forum members at a discount.
Hope this does not break any forum rules.
 
phil.p":4fynbul2 said:
Peacock oil is a steal. I've just invented one made from the perspiration of IPUs.

Phil, you really must work on your grammar, it is not "I" but my :wink:
 
Unless I've misunderstood, this oil is what Shane Skelton uses on the handles of his fantastic, beautiful, practical saws.

As the happy owner of one of his saws, I'd trust his judgement.

If I was making a small item like a saw handle or a drawer pull or a chess set, a relatively expensive oil would be appropriate for an eye-catching result. Maybe not for a floor or a dining table.
 
AndyT":lvop46xz said:
Unless I've misunderstood, this oil is what Shane Skelton uses on the handles of his fantastic, beautiful, practical saws.

As the happy owner of one of his saws, I'd trust his judgement.

If I was making a small item like a saw handle or a drawer pull or a chess set, a relatively expensive oil would be appropriate for an eye-catching result. Maybe not for a floor or a dining table.

Thanks Andy, at last somebody's offering a sensible comment :lol: Indeed he does use them on his saw handles, but at one time he used to work in the gun trade and Peacock Oil was (and still is I think) used on rather pricey :shock: English shotgun stocks. On my tuit list I have a definite hankering to make....

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...one these mid-cent Scandi cabinets on a stand (this one is in Rosewood and Ebony) but mine will be in English Walnut throughout (solid and veneered) so I fancied that a PO finish plus a bit of Alfie Shine to top it off might look rather fetching? - Rob
 

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I like that cabinet.

On the peacock oil, I wonder how it compares with tru-oil. Assuming it is similar in application, a few drops go a long way, so price per use is reasonable. When you open it, I would recommend pricking the foil seal (assuming it has one) with a nail, rather than removing it entirely. consider also decanting half into another container.
 
marcros":2t056hpq said:
I like that cabinet.

On the peacock oil, I wonder b=how it compares with tru-oil. Assuming it is similar in application, a few drops go a long way, so price per use is reasonable. When you open it, I would recommend pricking the foil seal (assuming it has one) with a nail, rather than removing it entirely. consider also decanting half into another container.

Your thoughts match mine.
I've found tru-oil excellent on close grained woods like yew.

And Rob, I'm sure you can do justice to that very challenging design if anyone can.
 
marcros":2jz29qsd said:
On the peacock oil, I wonder how it compares with tru-oil. Assuming it is similar in application, a few drops go a long way, so price per use is reasonable. When you open it, I would recommend pricking the foil seal (assuming it has one) with a nail, rather than removing it entirely. consider also decanting half into another container.

I seem to recollect that Jim Hendricks (late of this parish) was a big fan of Tru Oil and that he said it's also used on shotgun stocks. I was noodling around on t'interweb thingie last night and came across this UToob clip where various oil finishes (inc Tru Oil) are compared. It appears that Tru Oil was the best of the lot...worth seeing his conclusions at the end - Rob
 
OK, will try to be sensible for a moment, what is it made from to command that price?
And tru oil for that Matter.
 
Tru oil is "modified linseed oil" if I remember correctly from the lable.
It's thicker and stickier than plain linseed and is much better at building up a finish.
 
Ooo interesting!

I found a big can of linseed oil in my fathers tool shed, it's been there for around 40 years judging by the address on the tin; it's very thick and sticky!
I was going to thin it down and use it for unimportant jobs.
I will dispense it into 50 ml bottles and sell alongside my snake oil.
 
I had a look at this, being an expert. :wink:
Never used it but it sounds reassuringly expensive as the adverts used to say.
My use of finishes is very limited but TruOil is worth every penny in my book despite my inexperience. For a saw handle I just did, you are literally putting on drops per coat. I did 4 or 5 coats +1 coat of sealant for this saw. topic117487.html
It has a much better, richer finish than I can capture with my phone camera. I've used it on several handles for tools I've made and it stands up to wear extremely well. It's primarily a gun stock finish. It's designed to take a knock and be out in the wet. BLO might well do for may for toolhandles. Quite agree. Each to their own. If I'm going to spend a good few hours making a tool though, I only do it for my own pleasure, so I will continue to take my time finishing the handles so they look tip top and the finish is as easy as possible to apply.

For those that mentioned Alfie Shine, it's sold by Jim Hendricks. Formerly of this parish as they say, very prolific in the latest Richard Arnold Macmillan Cancer Auction day. Longer standing members will remember that his dog is called Alfie. It was Jim and the late and seemingly hugely loved RichardT thread that got me fascinated with plane making in the first place even if I was reading sometime after the event. Life is full of tiny cul de sacs that you don't notice at first.
I have a tin. Birthday voucher at Workshop Heaven.
No it's not the cheapest finish. Let's get that out the way first. Done.

Did you ever go to church as a kid and they are burning incense and it all feels a fit unfamilliar but oh my it's comforting and you look up and even the robes and the bits they drape round their necks as figures of 'authority' are all there and as a kid you feel you are in the presence of a quiet authority? Almost like they planned it eh? :wink: #organised religion :D
I'm not going to maintain that's the whole point, lets not lose direction but yeh. You can buy going to Harvest festival at the age of 7 for the first and maybe church generally 3 times in your life in a tin. I'm not messing with you now.
For info.
This is the most beautiful smelling finish to apply you will ever use. It's a joy to use if you're not after just getting on with it.
And.
To be fair.
It works well.
That's it.

Regards.
 

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